Academic Year 2013 Syllabus

グローバル教育院 ヒューマンバイオロジー学位プログラム 平成25年度 シ ラ バ ス School of Integrative and Global Majors...

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School of Integrative and Global Majors Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

Academic Year 2013

Syllabus グローバル教育院 ヒューマンバイオロジー学位プログラム 平成25年度

シ ラ バ ス

Contents 02RA010 Initiation Seminar ............................................................................ 3 02RA015 Initiation Seminar ............................................................................ 5 02RA020 World-Science Leaders' Seminar ...................................................... 7 02RA030 Business Leaders' Seminar .............................................................. 9 02RA040 Lectures In Experimental Science ................................................. 11 02RA050 Serendipity In Human Biology....................................................... 13 02RA060 CITI: Required Education For Human Research Participants (General Foundation)...................................................................................... 15 02RA061 CITI: Required Education For Human Research Participants (Elective).......................................................................................................... 17 02RA070 Communication In Human Biology I ............................................. 19 02RA080 Communication In Human Biology II............................................ 21 02RA090 International Discussion On Human Biology I ............................. 23 02RA100 International Discussion On Human Biology II ............................ 25 02RA101 Research Presentation And Discussion ......................................... 27 02RA102 Home Internship (Omics Analysis) ................................................ 29 02RA103 Home Internship (Integrative Physiology) .................................... 31 02RA110 Introduction For Appropriate Technology ...................................... 34 02RA111 International Research Rotation .................................................... 36 02RA112 Internship In Overseas Companies ................................................ 38 02RA113 Appropriate Technology .................................................................. 39 02RA114 Entrepreneurship Training ............................................................ 41 02RA115 Advanced International Research Rotation ................................... 43 02RA120 Human Anatomy And Embryology ................................................ 45 02RA121 Human Pathology And Oncology ................................................... 48 02RA122 Human Infection And Immunology ................................................ 51 02RA123 Human Endocrinology And Metabolism ........................................ 54 02RA124 Environmental Medicine ................................................................ 56 02RA130 Biochemistry And Molecular Biology ............................................. 58 02RA140 Molecular Cell Biology .................................................................... 60 02RA150 Pharmacology .................................................................................. 62 02RA160 Basic Toxicology .............................................................................. 64 02RA170 Human Chemical Biology ............................................................... 66

02RA180 Frontier Science In Drug Discovery ............................................... 68 02RA190 Mathematics For Biology ............................................................... 70 02RA200 Application Of Information Technology In Science ....................... 72 02RA210 Basic Computational Biology ......................................................... 74 02RA215 Computational Algorithms ............................................................. 77 02RA220 High Performance Computing Technology .................................... 79 02RA231 Gene Engineering and Genetically Modified Mice ........................ 81 02RA230 Reproductive Biology ...................................................................... 81 02RA232 Epigenome Physiology .................................................................... 85 02RA233 Signal Transduction And Drug Design .......................................... 87 02RA234 Stem Cell Therapy .......................................................................... 89 02RA235 Analysis Of Machineries In Human Biology ................................. 91 02RA236

Environmental

Health

Science,

Toxicology

And

Exposure

Assessment ...................................................................................................... 93 02RA240 Basic Experiments In Human Biology........................................... 95 02RA241 Basic Experiments In Human Biology........................................... 97 02RA250 Special Lectures In Human Biology I ............................................ 99 02RA260 Special Seminars In Human Biology I ......................................... 101 02RA270 Special Research In Human Biology I ......................................... 103 02RA271 Special Lectures In Human Biology II......................................... 105 02RA272 Special Seminars In Human Biology II ....................................... 107 02RA273 Special Research In Human Biology II ........................................ 109 02RA280 Special Practice In Human Biology I ............................................111 02RA281 Special Practice In Human Biology II.......................................... 113

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA010 Initiation Seminar Registration Number: 02RA010 Subject Name: Initiation Seminar Outline: In this first course of the PhD program in Human Biology, the students study the aims and objectives of the program, curriculum policies, lineups and time tables of the curriculum, and possible research topics in the program. In the career path seminar, the students convince a wide variety of possible future careers through lectures by guest lecturers, have discussions with their classmates, and then make study plans for the program. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Spring (A)

Intensive (April 12-13)

1

Room Number: Seminar House Joso Guidance(Laboratory of Advanced Research A, Room 706) Career Path Seminar(Seminar House Joso) Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Satoru Takahashi

e-mail: [email protected]

Mitsuyasu Kato e-mail: [email protected] GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the aims, objectives, and curricula of the program; convince wide possibilities of future careers; and make plans for class selection and research theme. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the aims and objectives of the program,

2.

To be able to explain the curriculum policies of the program,

3.

To be able to explain a wide variety of possible future careers,

4.

To be able to explain the lineups and time tables of the curriculum, and learn the ways

to select and register study subjects, 5.

To be able to explain the contents of the syllabus and evaluation criteria of each

subject, 6.

To be able to explain the ways to select PhD research theme,

7.

To write a report on study plans and desirable future career.

Course Schedule: Program Guidance (To be announced) Career Path Seminar(April 12-13 at Seminar House Joso) 3

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

Homework: Discuss with initial mentors, fix the aims of studies in the PhD program in Human Biology, make plans for subject studies, and determine approaches to decide research themes. Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the attendance and activity of the presentation and discussion at the career path seminar, in addition to the performance of their reports. In addition to the above requirements, the students who; -

Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further contribute others’ study by active and

useful discussions in the seminar are evaluated as A+ (top 10%), -

Understand well the aims and objectives of the program and write excellent reports on

their desirable future plans to solve global problems, are evaluated as A (upper 25%), -

Write good reports suitable for their future career plans are evaluated as B,

-

Attend the guidance and career path seminar, understand the aims and objectives of

the program and curriculum, and submit the report on their study plans for the program, are passed and evaluated as C or upper grades. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Program Guide Notes:

4

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA015 Initiation Seminar Registration Number: 02RA015 Subject Name: Initiation Seminar Outline: In this first course of the PhD program in Human Biology, the students study the aims and objectives of the program, curriculum policies, lineups and time tables of the curriculum, and possible research topics in the program. In the career path seminar, the students convince a wide variety of possible future careers through lectures by guest lecturers, have discussions with their classmates, and then make study plans for the program. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A)

Intensive (To be announced)

1

Room Number: Seminar House Joso Guidance(Laboratory of Advanced Research A, Room 706) Career Path Seminar(Seminar House Joso) Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Satoru Takahashi

e-mail: [email protected]

Mitsuyasu Kato e-mail: [email protected] GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the aims, objectives, and curricula of the program; convince wide possibilities of future careers; and make plans for class selection and research theme. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1. To be able to explain the aims and objectives of the program, 2. To be able to explain the curriculum policies of the program, 3. To be able to explain a wide variety of possible future careers, 4. To be able to explain the lineups and time tables of the curriculum, and learn the ways to select and register study subjects, 5. To be able to explain the contents of the syllabus and evaluation criteria of each subject, 6. To be able to explain the ways to select PhD research theme, 7. To write a report on study plans and desirable future career. Course Schedule: Program Guidance (To be announced) Career Path Seminar(Sept. at Seminar House Joso)

5

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Homework: Discuss with initial mentors, fix the aims of studies in the PhD program in Human Biology, make plans for subject studies, and determine approaches to decide research themes. Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the attendance and activity of the presentation and discussion at the career path seminar, in addition to the performance of their reports. In addition to the above requirements, the students who; -

Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further contribute others’ study by active and

useful discussions in the seminar are evaluated as A+ (top 10%), -

Understand well the aims and objectives of the program and write excellent reports on

their desirable future plans to solve global problems, are evaluated as A (upper 25%), -

Write good reports suitable for their future career plans are evaluated as B,

-

Attend the guidance and career path seminar, understand the aims and objectives of

the program and curriculum, and submit the report on their study plans for the program, are passed and evaluated as C or upper grades. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Program Guide Notes:

6

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA020 World-Science Leaders' Seminar Registration Number: 02RA020 Subject Name: World-Science Leaders' Seminar Outline: Seminars on the specialized fields of researches are given by the world-leading researchers. The students attending this seminar should be able to acquire skills of research presentation and discussion by discussing with the mentoring instructors on the recent research topics and to develop the professional and cognoscente skills for researches and abilities to conduct researches by writing reports. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Spring & Fall (A-C)

Irregular

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Yasunori Kanaho

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To read manuscripts related to the recent research topics learned in the seminars and to discuss with the mentoring instructors on them and related topics. To write reports on the recent research topics in order to deepen the understanding of researches. To develop an ability to understand manuscripts and to develop the skill of writing manuscripts. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the recent research topics learned in the seminars,

2.

To be able to discuss the recent research topics and closely related topics,

3.

To be able to develop how to write scientific manuscript by writing reports,

4.

To be able to develop an ability to conduct researches by writing reports.

Course Schedule: Seminars are held irregularly. Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) 7

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read manuscripts closely related to recent scientific topics. Discuss the contents of the recent research topics learned in this seminar and by reading the related manuscripts. Write at least three reports on the research topics related to the seminars given in this course. Textbook: N/A Notes: To be announced if any.

8

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA030 Business Leaders' Seminar Registration Number: 02RA030 Subject Name: Business Leaders' Seminar Outline: Navigating the labyrinth of international business and trade is a challenging and exciting undertaking. However, it can also be hard to deal with and costly process if undertaken without the necessary academic and professional training and experiences. In this seminar, business leaders are invited, who introduce the students to the achievements obtained through their academic and industrial activities including success and failure stories. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Spring & Fall (A-C)

Irregular

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Aki Fukamizu

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the worldwide knowledge developments and foundations for international business and the cultural context for managing in an overseas environment. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to understand the complexities, risks, and opportunities of international business through the invited leader’s talk,

2.

To be able to learn global business strategies,

3.

To be able to learn about international internships through the invited leader’s experiences

Course Schedule: To be announced Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the attendance (50%) and repots (50%). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) 9

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: The students must attend the course and submit the reports to summarize the talks for three speakers. Textbook: No textbook is required. Notes:

10

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA040 Lectures In Experimental Science Registration Number: 02RA040 Subject Name: Lectures In Experimental Science Outline: Lectures explain below: -How do they think of their main research ideas? -What hypotheses are the bases of their research programs? -What experiments do they use to prove their hypotheses? This lecture is omnibus and is led by young researchers. Based on the lectures seminar, students must present their research plans. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Spring (A, B)

Tuesday 2

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Keiji Kimura

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): Students learn the skills how to get research ideas by listening the lectures’ seminar how they hypothesize and perform the experiments. Students also learn how to plan the experiments to prove their idea. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to understand and explain the significance of the talk of the lecturers,

2.

To be able to have opinion to develop the experiments of the lecturers and express them. To be able to propose their research plan by using the lectures’ seminar as reference,

3.

Course Schedule: 1.

Introduction

Kimura K

2.

The mechanism of mitotic chromosome condensation

Kimura K

3.

The study of the brain environment regulated by protein metabolism

4.

Molecular mechanisms for faithful chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis

Tsuruta F

Kawashima SA (Univ. of Tokyo) 5.

5. Roles of RNA binding proteins in translational control

6.

Phosphatidylinositol signaling in tumorigenesis and anti-tumor immunity 11

Matsumoto K (Riken)

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Kishimoto H 7.

Presentation by students

Kimura K

8.

Presentation by students

Kimura K

9.

Presentation by students

Kimura K

10.

Presentation by students

Kimura K

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: After attending the lecture, students must hand in reports, in which they must describe an idea to develop the experiment of each lecturer. Students must also summarize their (research) backgrounds and present their experimental plans. Students are evaluated by the reports after each class (75%) and their presentation (25%). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read scientific journals. Textbook: References: 

Kimura, K and Hirano, T. Cell (1997) 90, 625-634



Matsumoto, K. et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. (2005) 25, 1779-1792



Tsuruta, F. et al., J. Cell Biol. (2009) 187, 279-294



Tanaka, K. J. et al., J. Biol. Chem. (2006) 281, 40096-40106



Kawashima, SA. Et al., Science (2010) 327,172-177



Kishimoto, H. et al., Blood (2007) 109, 3316-3324

Notes:

12

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA050 Serendipity In Human Biology Registration Number: 02RA050 Subject Name: Serendipity In Human Biology Outline: In this subject, professors inside/outside of the program including those from academic research and company institutes give recent research achievement, while students learn how researchers have opened new research fields. In particular, students try to understand the serendipity in Human Biology that results in the novel discovery and breakthrough ideas and experiments. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Spring (A, B)

Monday 5

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Tomoki Chiba ([email protected]), professors of this program (including visiting professors and researchers outside of the university) GIO (General Instructional Objective): Students learn how researchers have opened new research fields, in particular, the serendipity in Human Biology that results in the novel discovery and breakthrough ideas and experiments. To deepen the above understanding, students discuss with professors and by themselves, read papers related to the topics, and make out reports from own aspects. By doing so, student learn the outlines of a variety of research fields in Human Biology, accumulate knowledge on Human Biology, cultivate applied skills, and simultaneously recognize the importance of the serendipity in Human Biology. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1. To understand the lecture content and explain it 2. To understand the content of papers related to lectures, discuss the quintessence with professors and other students, and deepen the understanding 3. To collect information about lectures by reading papers, make out reports from own aspects, and acquaint themselves with the scientific writing Course Schedule: April 15th, Prof. Irie: The power of yeast genetics April 22nd, Prof. Fukamizu: Who made a trick fell for the simple trick 13

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology May 7th, Prof. Kawamura: An evolution model of GC contents - wet data and elementary mathematics May 13th, Prof. Kanaho: An unexpected result often leads to a novel finding: Identification of novel crosstalk in cell signaling systems May 20th, Prof. Shibuya: An experimental mistake lead to the great success, the discovery of IgM receptor! May 27th, Prof. Ohneda: Cells are not just cells. June 3rd, Prof. Baba: Luck, Steadfastness, and Patience/Perseverance June 10th, Ass. Prof. Minai: Development of a computational tool for comparison of protein surface structure June 17th, Ass. Prof. Kayanuma: Understanding mechanism of photoreactions using computer simulation June 24th, Prof. Yanagisawa: How to regulate gene transcription ? Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students attend more than 8 classes and discuss well (Grade C), read several papers related to three topics and make out three reports (Grade B). The reports that point out the significance for the novel discovery and breakthrough ideas and experiments adequately are estimated to be Grade A. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Original Papers related to each topic Notes:

14

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA060 CITI: Required Education For Human Research Participants (General Foundation) Registration Number: 02RA060 Subject Name: CITI: Required Education For Human Research Participants (General Foundation) Outline: CITI: Required Education for Human Research Participants (General Foundation) provides the opportunities for the students to learn ethical and legal knowledge required for human science research studies through e-learning systems hosted by the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI). Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Spring & Fall (A-C)

On Demand

1

Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Online Study at- https://www.citiprogram.org/ GIO (General Instructional Objective): To make deliberate research planning and manage activities of integrity on the basis of the research ethics and legal knowledge required for human science research studies. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the responsible conducts of human science research,

2.

To be able to explain the biosafety/biosecurity and risk management,

3.

To be able to understand the ethical and legal requirements for the research that the students focus on.

Course Schedule: 1.

Register for the CITI and study all required programs regarding responsible conducts of research courses and biosafety/ biosecurity courses,

2.

Finish animal care and use courses in the first year, if the students intend to use animal experiments,

3.

Gain more than 80% correct answers for the embedded quizzes to finish the section,

4.

Make portfolios for references.

Homework: Discuss with classmates about the CITI e-leaning systems and contents. Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the embedded quizzes and portfolios. 15

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology In addition, the students who; -

Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further make an excellent reference file of

research ethics and required legal knowledge and used it for their own research planning are evaluated as Superior (A+: top 10%), -

Have active discussions on the ethics and legal issues with initial mentoring instructors

and recognize to have enough knowledge are evaluated as Excellent (A; upper 25%), -

Additionally on the above requirements, students who made a well-organized portfolio

will be evaluated as Good (B), -

Pass all required embedded quizzes and submit the portfolios pass the examination

and evaluated as Average or upper grades (C or upper grades). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Notes:

16

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA061 CITI: Required Education For Human Research Participants (Elective) Registration Number: 02RA061 Subject Name: CITI: Required Education For Human Research Participants (Elective) Outline: CITI: Required Education for Human Research Participants (Elective) provides the opportunities for the students to learn ethical and legal knowledge required for human science research studies through e-learning systems hosted by the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI). In the elective course, the students will select a subject of study from Bio-Safety and Bio-Security, Animal Care and Use, and so forth. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring & Fall (A-C)

On Demand

2

Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Online Study at https://www.citiprogram.org/ GIO (General Instructional Objective): To make deliberate research planning and manage activities of integrity on the basis of the research ethics and legal knowledge required for human science research studies. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the responsible conducts of human science research,

2.

To be able to explain one of the specialized subjects among Bio-Safety and BioSecurity, Animal Care and Use, and so forth,

3.

To be able to understand the ethical and legal requirements for the research that the students focus on.

Course Schedule: 1.

Register for the CITI and study all required programs regarding responsible conducts of elective course subjects,

2.

Gain more than 80% correct answers for the embedded quizzes to finish the section,

3.

Make portfolios for references.

Homework: Discuss with classmates about the CITI e-leaning systems and contents. Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the embedded quizzes and portfolios. In addition, the students who; 17

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology -

Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further make an excellent reference file of

research ethics and required legal knowledge and used it for their own research planning are evaluated as Superior (A+: top 10%), -

Have active discussions on the ethics and legal issues with research supervisors and

recognize to have enough knowledge are evaluated as Excellent (A; upper 25%), -

Additionally on the above requirements, students who made a well-organized portfolio

will be evaluated as Good (B), -

Pass all required embedded quizzes and submit the portfolios pass the examination

and evaluated as Average or upper grades (C or upper grades). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: None Notes:

18

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA070 Communication In Human Biology I Registration Number: 02RA070 Subject Name: Communication In Human Biology I Outline: A literature-based, seminar-type course for the students to evaluate and review the latest scientific breakthrough and classical topics that significantly impact Human Biology. The goal of this course is for students to develop the proficiency they need to effectively and energetically communicate their professional achievements within the international scientific community. To this end, students in this course will practice scientific reading, presentation and feedback on their performance from peers and instructors. Upon completion of the course, students will have a foundation for sharing knowledge and ideas in the global arena of science. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Spring (B, C)

To be announced

1

Room Number: Medical Sciences Building, Room 204 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Kiong Ho

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To develop the proficiency they need to effectively and energetically communicate their professional achievements within the international scientific community. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To understand the essentials of current research topics

2.

To build the capacity to introduce research topics to a general audience

3.

To learn the state-of-research

4.

To develop a knowledge base in designing experiments

Course Schedule: Class meets 10 times during spring 2013 semester. Topics to be discussed will be selected by the students, with an approval by the faculty member. At the end of the course, students need to submit a final report for the course. Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: 19

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Students are evaluated based on their active participation, clarity of the presentation, discussion, and the quality of their report submitted. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Students are required to read the papers assigned for discussion. Students will prepare a written report for each topics discussed. Textbook: Research articles to be discussed for each class will be provided as a PDF files. Notes:

20

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA080 Communication In Human Biology II Registration Number: 02RA080 Subject Name: Communication In Human Biology II Outline: This is a literature-based, seminar-type course for first year graduate students. Students are expected to evaluate and review selected topic on Human Biology, and present research articles for discussion. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A, B)

Monday 2

1

Room Number: To be announced Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Prof. Kiong Ho e-mail: [email protected] GIO (General Instructional Objective): This course is designed for first year graduate student to present a research article on a selected subject. Topics include latest scientific breakthrough, as well as classical papers describing the significant impact on Human Biology. Student is expected to provide background information, hypothesis to be tested, and discuss the results, significance and future prospective of the research topic. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): Student in this course is expected to learn: 1.

How to organize and present research papers.

2.

Modern and classical methodologies described in the research articles.

3.

How to define hypothesis and understand the objective of the research.

4.

How to critically think and evaluate the data and to discuss the results among the peers.

Course Schedule: Class meets every week starting October 7, 2013. Research topics to be discussed will be derived from the following topics: Molecular Biology of Gene Expression, Advance in Biochemistry, Structure Biology and Chemical Biology. Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: 21

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Students are evaluated based on their active participation, clarity of the presentation, discussion, and the quality of their report submitted. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Students are required to read the papers assigned for discussion. Students will prepare a written report for each topics discussed. Textbook: Research articles to be discussed for each class will be provided as a PDF files. Notes:

22

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA090 International Discussion On Human Biology I Registration Number: 02RA090 Subject Name: International Discussion On Human Biology I Outline: Focusing on molecular biology of the cell, International discussion on human biology I provides the opportunities for the students to have interactive online distance learning with the National Taiwan University and the Kyoto University, and to be engaged in thesis presentation and discussion conducted in English. In this course, the students should be able to understand basic knowledge of life sciences and acquire scientific communication skills in English. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A, B)

Friday 2-3

1

(Friday, 10:00-12:30) Room Number: Health and Medical Science Innovation Laboratory, Meeting Room 105 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Kenji Irie

e-mail: [email protected]

Ryosuke Ohniwa

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): Boosting scientific communication in English, exploring biological sciences, and promoting international long-distance academic and research exchanges. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): Boosting scientific communication in English, exploring biological sciences. Course Schedule: April 12, 19, 26, May 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, June 7, 14, 21, 28 Reference (Course in Spring 2012) Topic: Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology 1. Review of the structures of biological macromolecules, protein structure and intracellular transport 2. DNA replication, transcription, and repair 3. Nuclear-cytoplasmic communication through nuclear pore complex 4. Overview of intracellular signaling pathways/Membrane receptors for cell growth 5. Developmental signals 23

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 6. Small RNA mediated gene silencing in animals Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Class attendance and participation, presentation and discussion. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Molecular Biology of the Cell Notes:

24

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA100 International Discussion On Human Biology II Registration Number: 02RA100 Subject Name: International Discussion On Human Biology II Outline: Focusing on molecular biology of the cell, International discussion on human biology I provides the opportunities for the students to have interactive online distance learning with the National Taiwan University and the Kyoto University, and to be engaged in thesis presentation and discussion conducted in English. In this course, the students should be able to understand basic knowledge of life sciences and acquire scientific communication skills in English. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Fall (A-C)

Wednesday 1-2

1

(Wednesday, 9:30-12:00) Room Number: Health and Medical Science Innovation Laboratory, Meeting Room 105 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Kenji Irie

e-mail: [email protected]

Ryosuke Ohniwa

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): Boosting scientific communication in English, exploring biological sciences, and promoting international long-distance academic and research exchanges. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): Boosting scientific communication in English, exploring biological sciences. Course Schedule: To be announced Reference (Course in Fall 2012) Topic: Cancer biology 1. The Biology of Cancer: tumorigenesis 2. Telomere biology 3. Signaling transduction in cancer cells 4. Cancer epigenetics 5. Stem cell and cancer 6. Cancer Biology 25

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 7. Tumor virology 8. Comparative cancer genomics 9. Animal models in cancer research 10. Mechanisms of genomic instability and its cancer relation 11. Neuroblastoma 12. RNA regulation and its cancer relation Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Class attendance and participation, presentation and discussion. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Cancer Biology Notes:

26

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA101 Research Presentation And Discussion Registration Number: 02RA101 Subject Name: Research Presentation And Discussion Outline: Invited speakers and students give presentation about their research and discuss them in English Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Wednesday 2

1

Room Number: Medical Sciences Building, Room 305 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Brian Purdue

e-mail: [email protected]

Hiroyuki Suzuki

e-mail: [email protected]

Mitsuyasu Kato

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the broad fields of research and to discuss them in English. To learn how to give a good presentation in English SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to give a presentation about your own research objectives, methods, results and future directions in English

2.

To be able to explain the worldwide location and creativity of your own research in English

3.

To be able to understand the questions from audience and discuss them in English

4.

To be able to understand the contents, significance and weak points of presentations from other speakers.

5.

To be able to discuss the contents, significance and weak points of presentations from other speakers in English.

Course Schedule: First Class: Wednesday 17 April 2013 Homework: Improve the ability of English communication by active discussion and communication with each other.

27

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by the points listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Notes:

28

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA102 Home Internship (Omics Analysis) Registration Number: 02RA102 Subject Name: Home Internship (Omics Analysis) Outline: In this Home Internship Course, the students will study the advanced laboratory experiments in proteomics & metabolomics. The students will also understand basic analytical principles so they can apply them to proteomics & metabolomics profiling. This course will focus on practical applications for proteomic research by Mass Spectrometry, so the students are guided to design better and successful experiments and to more easily interpret the resulting data. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Intensive

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Prof. Taka-Aki Sato

e-mail: [email protected]

Associate Prof. Takashi Shimada

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the successful experimental design of proteomics and metabolomics analysis and to interpret the resulting data by advanced analytical instrument including Mass Spectrometry. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the aims and objectives of proteomics & metabolomics research and the principal of analytical instruments including Mass Spectrometry.

2.

To be able to explain the cutting-edge technologies and solutions of the advanced molecular analytical instruments.

3.

To be able to prepare the cell extracts from cell lines and tissue samples.

4.

To be able to experiment electrophoretic techniques as isoelectric focusing, SDS page, 2-D page.

5.

To be able to experiment liquid-chromatography techniques, such as ion exchange, affinity chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC.

6.

To be able to utilize the advanced molecular analytical instruments including Mass Spectrometry.

7.

To be able to interpret the experimental data including Mass Spectrometry profiling.

8.

To be able to make an experimental report (Introduction, Material & Methods, 29

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Experimental Results, Discussions, References) and to design future experiments. Course Schedule: September 24, 25, 26, 27 1.

Introduction of general proteomics & metabolomics research Shimada and Sato

2.

Introduction of Mass Spectrometry (MS)

Shimada and Sato

3.

Introduction of preparation of samples for proteomics &

Shimada and Sato

metabolomics research. 4.

Application of Mass Spectrometry (proteome)

Shimada and Sato

5.

Application of Mass Spectrometry (metabolome)

Shimada and Sato

6.

Application of Mass Spectrometry (genome)

Shimada and Sato

7.

Application of Mass Spectrometry (MS imaging)

Shimada and Sato

8.

Interpretation of Mass Spectrometry profiling data

Shimada and Sato

9.

Preparation of an experimental report and

Shimada and Sato

10.

future experimental design

Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by the scientific and experimental quality of the proteomics & metabolomics data, its interpretation and discussion in the experimental course, and their qualifications are determined by accomplishment of the original research projects. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Attend the course of Analysis of Machineries in Human Biology. The textbook and general proteomics analysis notes will be announced. Textbook: TBA

30

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA103 Home Internship (Integrative Physiology) Registration Number: 02RA103 Subject Name: Home Internship (Integrative Physiology) Outline: Integrative physiology is very valid learning to understand the functional changes in our body. We are based on the integrated physiological investigations of such ideas, looking at proposed health care worth a new perspective. Particularly, in this curriculum(lecture and training), you will study the physiological function (i.e., sedative effect) of aroma components. We hope that you will successfully build up robust professional captaincy with strong leadership to accomplish the task. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Intensive

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Yukihiro Yada

e-mail 1: [email protected] e-mail 2: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the integrative physiology, morphological examinations and to learn strategies to obtain the knowledge and the important measurement techniques of autonomic nervous system and central nervous system . SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to study the general knowledge of functional physiology, i.e., the autonomic nervous system (the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous system), and central nervous system,

2.

To be able to study the newest analytic technologies for autonomic nervous system of human body, i.e., heart rate variability analysis, blood pressure change analysis, pupil analysis (miosis) and pulse wave analysis,

3.

To be able to study the newest analytic technologies for central nervous system of human brain, i.e., NIRS(=Near Infra-red Spectroscopy), fMRI(=functional magnetic resonance imaging) ,

4.

To be able to study the physiological function of aroma components, particularly, the interesting function and new mechanism of cedrol(contained in cedar wood oil)

5.

To be able to study the important analytic technologies for stress-related hormones in human saliva, i.e., cortisol, amylase and clomogranin A, 31

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 6.

To be able to master the experimental methods for integrative evaluation of natural aroma component, i.e., measurement of miosis, continuous blood pressure, NIRS and cortisol

Course Schedule: 1. Introduction to research and development of Kao Corporation 2. Introduction to integrative physiology 3. Autonomic nervous system and the measuring method 4. Central nervous system and the measuring method 5. Introduction of cedrol and the physiological function 6. Explanation the physiological experiment of aroma components Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by percentage of attendance (50%) and experimental reports (50%). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Use original notes(for textbooks), papers(for research of cedrol) and manual of measuring instruments. References 1. Yamamoto, Y.: The effects of cedrol on sleep. (2003) J Jpn Physiol Anthropol, 8, 2, 69-74 2. Dayawansa, S., et al.: Autonomic responses during inhalation of natural fragrance of “Cedrol” in humans. (2003) Auton Neurosci: Basic and Clinical, 108, 79-86 3. Dayawansa, S. et al. : Autonomic responses during inhalation of natural flagrance of cedrol in human. (2005) J Jpn Soc Aroma, 4, 17-21 4.Hirose K, : Effects of cedrol treatment as a complementary therapy on sleep disorder and symptoms in menopause. J Jpn Menopause Soc, 14, 2, 225-231(2006) 5. Akutsu T, et al.: Effect f the natural fragrance “cedrol” on dopamine metabolism in the lateral hypothalamic area of restrained rats: A microdialysis study. (2006) International Congress Series, 1287, 195-200 6. Yada Y, et al.: Overseas survey of the effect of cedrol on the autonomic nervous system in 32

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology three countries. (2007) J Physiol Anthropol, 26, 349-354 7. Sadachi H, et al.: Effect of cedrol on the autonomic nervous system in USA. (2007) Jpn Cosme Sci Society, 31, 3, 148-152 8. Umeno K, et al. : Effects of direct cedrol inhalation into the lower airway on autonomic nervous activity in totally laryngectomized subjects. (2007) Br J Clin Pharmacol, 65, 2, 188196. Notes: Students will be divided some groups (3~4 persons per one group) to evaluate the physiological effect of aroma components. Each group suitably choices an aroma component, and all members cooperatively evaluate the effect of aroma. Maker’s engineers of measuring instruments (for measurement of miosis, NIRS, blood pressure and cortisol) will kindly support your experiment. Students individually have to submit an experimental report within at least one month

33

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA110 Introduction For Appropriate Technology Registration Number: 02RA110 Subject Name: Introduction For Appropriate Technology Outline: Through lecture and discussion series, Introduction for appropriate technology provides the opportunities for the students to gain basic knowledge required for studying a wide range of appropriate technology subjects, such as appropriate technology training, current social circumstances in developing countries, field activities, and so forth. What is Introduction for Appropriate Technology? The world population pyramid indicates that those who with annual income below 3,000 dollars are regarded as the phase of Base of the Pyramid (BOP). In the world today, BOP Business which ensures sustainable business strategies should be a potential market for the phase of BOP to buy products or services at affordable price and to improve their quality of life. With regards to local cultures, social customs, and environments of targeted communities in developing countries, ‘Appropriate Technology’ addresses the technology design regarding appropriate functions and prices. Through a series of lectures and discussions led by the lecterures, Introduction for Appropriate Technology provides opportunities for the students to acquire basic knowledge of appropriate technology subjects, such as appropriate technology training, current social circumstances in developing countries, and field activities. Focusing on the targeted BOP market which truly needs the particular products in the world, Appropriate Technology, an advanced course of Introduction for Appropriate Technology, further engages the students to incorporate their existing fieldwork into the appropriate technology design in terms of local cultures, customs, and environments, and develop the products with sustainable business strategies afterward. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Spring (C)

Intensive

1

Room Number: July 8 2013: Health and Medical Science Innovation Laboratory, 8F Hall July 9 2013: Health and Medical Science Innovation Laboratory, Meeting Room 105 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Kenji Irie

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To gain basic knowledge required for studying a wide range of appropriate technology subjects, such as appropriate technology training, current social circumstances in developing countries, field activities, and so forth. 34

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): To gain basic knowledge required for studying a wide range of appropriate technology subjects, such as appropriate technology training, current social circumstances in developing countries, field activities, and so forth. Course Schedule: 8-9 July 2013 Grading Methods and Criteria: Class attendance and participation, report Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment:

35

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA111 International Research Rotation Registration Number: 02RA111 Subject Name: International Research Rotation Outline: Researches require experimental techniques and abilities to accomplish experiments, precisely analyze experimental results, and minutely discuss with the international leading scientists. This course offers the students the opportunities to acquire experimental techniques and abilities described above by performing researches in one or two laboratories, in which the students are interested, for 1-2 months under the supervision of the faculty members of the Ph.D. Program in Human Biology. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Fall (A-C)

Irregular 1-2 months (Intensive)

5

Room Number: Laboratory of each professor Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Yasunori Kanaho

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To acquire a wide variety of experimental techniques. To understand the aim of specific researches. To discuss with supervisors on the obtained results and how to advance researches. To cultivate internationality and acquire an ability to precisely analyze the obtained results. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the aim of specific researches that the students performed,

2.

To be able to explain the experimental results that the students obtained,

3.

To be able to explain the detail of experimental techniques that the students learned.

4.

To be able to discuss on the experimental results that the students obtained.

Course Schedule: Select 1~2 laboratories, in which the students are interested, from those presided by the faculty members in the Ph.D. Program in Human Biology, and negotiate with the supervisors when the students can perform their experiments. Perform experiments for 1-2 months. Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: 36

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Students are evaluated by the reports of their researches based on the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read manuscripts related to the specific researches that the students perform. Discuss the experimental results and how to advance researches with laboratory members as well as supervisors. Textbook: N/A Notes: To be announced if any.

37

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA112 Internship In Overseas Companies Registration Number: 02RA112 Subject Name: Internship In Overseas Companies Outline: An international internship is approved for on-the-job work experience where scientific knowledge obtained from classes is integrated with actual practical work experiences. Internships provide you with knowledge of career opportunities, help students gain an understanding of the roles on basic and translational research plays in today’s business environment, and how one might better prepare to be a successful part of the profession. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Fall (A-C)

Irregular

5

Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Akiyoshi Fukamizu

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To learn through experience the role of basic and translational research in business. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explore and obtain information on career opportunities,

2.

To be able to network with professionals and identify possible collaborators,

3 .To be able to return with experiences that will enrich future course work Course Schedule: Assignment: Grading Methods and Criteria: Your internship provider has an opportunity to evaluate you. Students are evaluated by the reports of your hosts based on your activities. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Textbook: No textbook is required. 38

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA113 Appropriate Technology Registration Number: 02RA113 Subject Name: Appropriate Technology Outline: In terms of local needs, cultures, environments, and people, Appropriate Technology, provides opportunities for the students to develop the optimum technology needed for targeted communities and to generate problem-solving skills, improvisational capabilities, and entrepreneurial abilities for future social needs. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Fall (A-C)

Irregular

5

Room Number: To be announced Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Kenji Irie

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To develop the optimum technology needed for targeted communities and to generate problem-solving skills, improvisational capabilities, and entrepreneurial abilities for future social needs. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): To develop the optimum technology needed for targeted communities and to generate problem-solving skills, improvisational capabilities, and entrepreneurial abilities for future social needs. Course Schedule: June: Guidance July-September: Field trip to local communities to find local needs (at least 1 week) September-December: Develop the optimum technology needed for targeted communities December: Presentation of the optimum technology and a business plan with the technology Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by Grading Criteria as follows: Grading Criteria 39

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Notes: Students have to take a subject “Introduction for appropriate technology”, before taking this subject. Students have to apply the HBP travel grant for filed trip.

40

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA114 Entrepreneurship Training Registration Number: 02RA114 Subject Name: Entrepreneurship Training Outline: Students learn the structure of life science business. Students learn the business minds and skills required in practical application of seeds technologies and ideas produced in basic researches to the industry and society. Students also learn knowhow and skills for catching social needs, foundation of enterprise, continuation of business, through lectures and seminars by experts and veterans of entrepreneurship. Students plan/simulate inauguration of bio-ventures based on their own research themes. Success cases and failure cases will be used as teaching materials. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Fall (A-C)

Intensive

5

Room Number: To be announced Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Ohneda, O

e-mail: [email protected]

Harada Y

email: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To learn basic knowhow and skills for the inauguration of venture/enterprise and continuation of business as fruits of basic researches. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain fundamental process for creation/inauguration of life science

business, 2.

To be able to simulate a creation of enterprise (business model) by using specific

research themes. Course Schedule: 1.

Overview of life science business

Oct. 21

2.

Lecture on structure of biotechnology industry and bio-venture Undecided(Oct.22-Nov.1)

3.

Lecture on skills for bio-business start-up Undecided(Oct.22-Nov.1)

4.

Lecture on intellectual properties Undecided(Oct.22-Nov.1) 41

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 5.

Project management

Undecided(Oct.22-Nov.1)

6.

Lecture on social needs, marketing, business model, financial issue etc. Undecided(Oct.22-Nov.1)

7.

Simulation of bio-business (Group work) 1 (preparation)

Nov. 5

8.

Simulation of bio-business (Group work) 2 (didcussion)

Nov. 5

9.

Preparation business model documents and presentation document

10.

10.

Presentation of business model and discussion 1 (peer review)

Nov. 19

11.

11.

Presentation of business model and discussion 2 (competition)

Nov. 19

12.

12.

Brain storming, free discussion

Nov. 20

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by contribution to simulate business models in group works (50%), and quality of business model document and presentation skill (50%) to evaluate the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read textbooks and activate discussion out of classes. Textbook: SCIENCE BUSINESS The promise, The reality, and the future of biotech. Gary P. Pisano Notes:

42

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA115 Advanced International Research Rotation Registration Number: 02RA115 Subject Name: Advanced International Research Rotation Outline: Researches require experimental techniques and abilities to accomplish experiments, precisely analyze experimental results, advance researches and minutely discuss with the international leading scientists. This course offers the students the opportunities to acquire abilities to design and conduct researches and develop doctoral thesis researches by performing researches in a laboratory, in which the students are interested, for 6~18 months under the supervision of the faculty members of the Ph.D. Program in Human Biology. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

3-5

Spring & Fall (A-C)

Irregular

10

Room Number: Laboratory of each professor Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Yasunori Kanaho

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To acquire the abilities how to advance researches and how to instruct students in advancement of researches. To discuss the obtained results and how to advance researches with supervisors. To cultivate the internationality and acquire an ability to develop professional researches and of internationality. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the aim of special researches that the students performed,

2.

To be able to explain the experimental results that the students obtained,

3.

To be able to discuss how to advance researches with leading scientists,

4.

To be able to present data at scientific meetings.

Course Schedule: Select specific laboratories that the students are interested in from those presided by the faculty members in the Ph.D. Program in Human Biology, and negotiate with the supervisors when the students perform their experiments. Perform experiments for 6~18 months. Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: 43

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Students are evaluated by the supervisors based on the abilities listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read manuscripts related to the specific researches that the students perform. Discuss the experimental results and how to advance researches with laboratory members as well as supervisors. Present at the scientific meetings. Textbook: N/A Notes: To be announced if any.

44

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA120 Human Anatomy And Embryology Registration Number: 02RA120 Subject Name: Human Anatomy And Embryology Outline: Human anatomy, which is the study of the structure of the entire human body and its relation to function, is an essential part of many novel and emerging interdisciplinary fields in science. First part of the course regarding anatomy provides international students with simplified and integrative essence of gross anatomy using adequate presentation-slides containing a number of images. Second part of the course focuses on fundamental knowledge on embryology to help comprehensive understanding of recent advances in technologies, including regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and reproductive technology. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A-C)

Monday 3 - 4

2

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Satoru Takahashi

e-mail: [email protected]

Masatsukgu Ema

e-mail: [email protected]

Hisashi Oishi

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): The primary goal of the course is to provide students with a broad understanding of the gross anatomy and embryology of the entire human body. This knowledge serves as a foundation for research abilities in medicine and life science. In addition, this course prepares students to apply anatomy and embryology concepts to better insight into the pathophysiology of disease processes. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): At the end of this course, students should be able to: 1.

Define the anatomical positions and planes, use them correctly, and develop a positive approach-to the subject.

2.

Describe the course of the ascending aorta, the arch of the aorta and the descending thoracic aorta. Name their major branches and the structures they supply.

3.

Explain the thoracic, abdomen, and pelvis cavities and the viscera they contain.

4.

Describe the major joints of the body, their movements and the muscles producing these movements.

5.

Describe the type of tissues derived from the three embryonic germ layers. 45

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 6.

Explain the different stages of human development.

7.

Explain the molecular regulation of cardiac development.

8.

Describe the process of neurulation and include definitions for the terms neural folds, neural tubes, and neural tube closure.

9.

Explain the reason why the third to eighth weeks of embryogenesis are so important for normal development and the most sensitive for induction of structural defects

Course Schedule: The following is a tentative schedule. 1-5; Anatomy, 6-10: Embryology 1. Introduction to Anatomy

Takahashi S

2. Thorax

Ema M

3. Abdomen

Oishi H

4. Pelvis and Perineum

Takahashi S

5. Head

Oishi H

6. General Embryology (1)

Ema M

7. General Embryology (2)

Ema M

8. Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems

Oishi H

9. Digestive and Urogenital Systems

Takahashi S

10. Head and Neck, Central Nervous Systems

Oishi H

Grading Methods and Criteria: All students are required to hand in a report to evaluate the knowledge listed in the SBO. The report title is provided at the end of the course. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Skimming the textbook. Textbook: - Essential Clinical Anatomy, 4th edition, Moore, Agur, and Dalley, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010 - Langman’s Medical Embryology 12th edition, Sadler Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011 Notes: The lecture is not intended to present all information; students are expected to study 46

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology information in the assigned textbook to supplement material presented in the lectures.

47

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA121 Human Pathology And Oncology Registration Number: 02RA121 Subject Name: Human Pathology And Oncology Outline: Human Pathology and Oncology provides opportunities for the students to learn about the basic disease entities of circulatory disorders (i.e., edema, thrombosis, and infarction), inflammation, and neoplasia, in terms of the causes, pathogenesis, and morphological changes of human diseases. Examining pathological specimen of common diseases, the students should be able to understand various human in vivo phenomena. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A, B)

Wednesday 5-6

2

Room Number: Medical Sciences Building, Room 204 (4/24, 5/1), Health and Medical Science Innovation Laboratory, Meeting Room 301-2 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Mitsuyasu Kato e-mail: [email protected] GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the structural, biochemical, and functional changes in cells, tissues, and organs that underlie human disease. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain common circulatory disorders (hemorrhage, thrombosis, embolism, infarction, edema and shock),

2.

To be able to explain the definition, classification, morphological changes, and time course of inflammation,

3.

To be able to explain the process and a variation of cell injury and death,

4.

To be able to explain the process of tissue repair and adaptation (atrophy, hypertrophy, hyperplasia and metaplasia),

5.

To be able to explain the definition of benign and malignant neoplasm and cancer,

6.

To be able to explain the local growth and metastasis of cancer,

7.

To be able to explain the clinical staging of cancer,

8.

To be able to explain the function of major oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,

9.

To be able to explain the major cancer and related disorders in each tissues and organs,

10.

To be able to explain current status of cancer epidemiology, treatment and prevention.

48

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Course Schedule: April 17, 5th

1. Introduction to Pathology

Kato, M

2. Tissue Homeostasis and Regeneration

Kato, M

April 24, 5th

3. Circulatory Disturbance I

Kato, M

6th

4. Circulatory Disturbance II

Kato, M

May 1, 5th

5. Inflammation I

Kato, M

6th

6. Inflammation II

Kato, M

7. Cell Injury and Death

Suzuki, H

8. Degeneration, Hyperplasia and Hypertrophy

Suzuki, H

9. Hallmarks of Cancer

Kato, M

6th

May 8, 5th 6th May 15, 5th 6th May 22, 5th 6th May 29, 5th 6th June 5, 5th 6th June 12, 5th 6th June 19, 5th 6th

10. Invasion and Metastasis

Kato, M

11. Oncogenes

Suzuki, H

12. Tumor Suppressor Genes

Suzuki, H

13. Diagnostic Pathology

Noguchi, M

14. Lung Cancer

Noguchi, M

15. Gastric Cancer and Colorectal Cancer

Oda, T

16. Pancreatic Cancer and Hepatocellular carcinoma

Oda, T

17. Leukemia and Related Disorders

Chiba, S

18. Brain Tumor

Ishikawa, E

19. Cancers in Kidneys, Bladder, and Prostate

Nishiyama H

20. Cancers in Female Reproductive Organs

Yoshikawa, H

Homework: Read textbook. Study histopathology by virtual slides. Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the short tests after each lectures (50%) and an end-of-term examination (50%). In the above examinations, the students who got; Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: 49

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Robbins and Cotran, Pathologic Basis of Disease 8th edition. Kumar, Abbas, Fausto and Aster ed., Saunders, 2010. Notes:

50

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA122 Human Infection And Immunology Registration Number: 02RA122 Subject Name: Human Infection And Immunology Outline: To understand infection biology and immunology is the basis to develop a strategy for control of infectious diseases all over the world. In this course, students study the molecular mechanism of replication and pathogenicity of infectious microbes such as viruses and bacteria, and the structure and function of microbes-encoded factors and host cell-derived factors involved in the replication and pathogenicity. In addition, students also study the immune system, including adaptive and innate immunities, which is crucial for human health and survival. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A, B)

Monday 3 (Infection Biology)

2

Monday 4 (Immunology) Room Number: Medical Sciences Building, Room 204 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Caretaker, Akira Shibuya

e-mail: [email protected]

Teaching members, (Infection Biology) Mitsuru Okuwaki, email: [email protected] Kaoru Takeuchi, e-mail: [email protected] Atsushi Kawaguchi, email: [email protected] Morikawa Kazuya, e-mail: [email protected] Shinji Saito, e-mail: e-mail: [email protected] Ryosuke Ohniwa, e-mail: [email protected] Kiong Ho, e-mail: [email protected] (Immunology) Akira Shibuya, e-mail: [email protected] Takayuki Sumida, e-mail: [email protected] Kazuko Shibuya, e-mail: [email protected] Satoko Tahara, e-mail: [email protected] GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the nature of infectious microbes such as bacteria and viruses, the host 51

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology immune system, and the molecular interface between infectious microbes and host immunity. Based on the basic knowledge, students aim to obtain ability to develop a strategy for control of human infectious diseases. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the biological characteristics of bacteria

2.

To be able to explain the properties of pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria

3.

To be able to explain the mechanism and regulation of bacterial pathogenicity

4.

To be able to explain the control of Infectious disease, antimicrobials, and drug resistance

5.

To be able to explain the replication mechanism of parasites & fungi

6.

To be able to explain the molecular pathogenesis of parasites & fungi

7.

To be able to explain the molecular basis of virus genome replication

8.

To be able to explain the molecular pathogenesis of viruses

9.

To be able to explain the outline of virus engineering

10.

To be able to explain the control mechanism & strategy for viruses

11.

To be able to explain the cells and tissues of the immune system.

12.

To be able to explain the structure and function of antibodies.

13.

To be able to explain lymphocyte development and antigen receptor gene rearrangement.

14.

To be able to explain the innate immune system.

15.

To be able to explain the adaptive immune system.

16.

To be able to explain the pathophysiology of immunological diseases.

Course Schedule: (Infection Biology) 1. Biological characteristics of bacteria

Morikawa, K

2. Properties of pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria

Morikawa, K

3. Mechanism and regulation of bacterial pathogenicity

Saito, S

4. Control of Infectious disease, antimicrobials, and drug resistance

Ohniwa, R

5. Replication mechanism of parasites & fungi

Ho, K

6. Molecular pathogenesis of parasites & fungi

Ho, K

7. Molecular basis of virus genome replication

Okuwaki, M

8. Molecular pathogenesis of viruses

Kawaguchi, A

9. Outline of virus engineering

Okuwaki, M

10. Control mechanism & strategy for viruses

Takeuchi, K

(Immunology) 1-2. Introduction of Immunology

Shibuya A

3-4. The Immune System -Adaptive Immunity-

Shibuya K

5-6. The Immune System -Innate Immunity-

Shibuya A 52

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 7-8. Immunity against Infectious diseases

Tahara S

9-10. Autoimmune Diseases and Allergy

Sumida T

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by reports and/or examination to evaluate the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read textbooks. Textbook: Microbiology, Principles and Explorations, 6th Edition, Jacquelyn G. Black ed., Wiley, New York, 2012 Principles of Virology, 3rd Edition, S. Jane Flint, L. W. Enquist, Vincent R. Racaniello ed., ASM, 2009 Cellular and Molecular Immunobiology, 7th Edition, Abbas, Lichtman and Pillai ed., SaundersElsevier, Philadelphia, 2012 Notes:

53

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA123 Human Endocrinology And Metabolism Registration Number: 02RA123 Subject Name: Human Endocrinology And Metabolism Outline: Endocrine and metabolic disorders present major public health problems in many parts of the world, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, adrenal disease, and osteoporosis. This course aims to develop the students' abilities to theoretically understand how hormones work and how their actions are altered in disease states and to improve the quality of patient care in endocrinology and metabolism. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Tuesday 3 - 4

2

Room Number: Health and Medical Science Innovation Laboratory, Meeting Room 105 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Hitoshi Shimano

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the general pathophysiological viewpoints and concepts of endocrine and metabolic disease based on molecular and clinical examinations and to learn strategies to obtain the knowledge of particular disease in systemic endocrinology and metabolism. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the biosynthesis, storage, chemistry, and physiological function of hormones and with the cells of the endocrine glands and tissues that secrete them,

2.

To be able to explain the metabolism of glucose, fatty acid, cholesterol, and amino acid,

3.

To be able to explain the transcriptional regulation of energy metabolism,

4.

To be able to explain molecular basis of obesity, appetite, and body weight regulation,

5.

To be able to explain the definition and molecular basis of diabetes,

6.

To be able to explain the definition and molecular basis of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis,

7.

To be able to explain molecular and clinical basis of major endocrine disease,,

8.

To be able to explain molecular basis of bone metabolism.

Course Schedule: 1.

Introduction of Endocrinology and Metabolism

Shimano H,

16 April

2.

Transcriptional Regulation of Energy Metabolism

Nakagawa Y,

23 April

54

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 3.

Nutrigenomics

Yahagi N,

30 April

4.

Fatty Acid Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

Matsuzaka T

14 May

5.

Body Weight Regulation and Obesity

Iwasaki H,

6.

Diabetes

Yatoh S,

28 May

7.

Atherosclerosis

Shimada M,

4 June

8.

Current Topics in Endocrinology and Metabolism I

Matsuzaka T,

11 June

9.

Bone Metabolism

Shimada M,

18 June

Takeuchi Y,

25 June

10. Current Topics in Endocrinology and Metabolism

24 May (Class1-2)

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by the short tests after each class (50%) and final examination (50%) to evaluate the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read textbooks and General Endocrinology and Metabolism Notes. Discuss with teacher and students and improve own ability for research, specialty, and creativity. Textbook: 『Joslin’s Diabetes Mellitus』 14th Edition, Kahn CR, Weir GC, King GL, Jacobson AM, Moses AC, Smith RJ ed., Lippincott Williams & Wilkins『Williams Textbook of Endocrinology』10th Edition, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Foster DW, and Wilson JD ed., Saunders 2002『Endocrinology』5th Edition, Degroot L, Jameson JL ed., Saunders 2005 Notes:

55

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA124 Environmental Medicine Registration Number: 02RA124 Subject Name: Environmental Medicine Outline: Environmental Medicine has increasingly become a subject of concern to the general public in recent years. The environment in which humans live is complex, and we may encounter many different potentially toxic chemical substances during the course of our lives. In this course, students will study 1) the general aspect of Environmental Medicine, 2) environmental chemicals (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile chemicals in the atmosphere, diesel fumes, tobacco smoke components, heavy metals and endocrine disruptors in food, toxic metalloid in groundwater, nano-particles etc.) as modulators of human disease and dysfunction and 3) exposure-response relationships of environmental chemicals in the body. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Wednesday 4

1

Room Number: Health and Medical Innovation Laboratory, Room 301-2 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Yoshito Kumagai

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the general concepts of environmental medicine involving the interactions between environment and human health, and the role of the environment in causing or mediating disease. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1. To be able to explain interaction of environmental chemicals with cellular macromolecules, 2. To be able to explain environmental chemicals in the atmosphere and its health effects, 3. To be able to explain contamination of groundwater and its health effects. 4. To be able to explain food-related health risks, 5. To be able to explain the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on humans such as dioxin, 6. To be able to explain fish consumption and risk of mercury poisoning, 7. To be able to explain lead poisoning from leaded gasoline, paint, and plumbing, 8. To be able to explain molecular basis of cellular defense mechanisms against environmental chemicals.

56

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Course Schedule: 1.

Introduction to Environmental Medicine

Kumagai Y

2.

Interaction of Environmental Chemicals with Cellular Macromolecules Kumagai Y

3.

Environmental Chemicals in the Atmosphere and Health Effect Kumagai Y

4.

Metalloids in Groundwater and Health Effect

Kumagai Y

5.

Food-Related Health Risks

Kumagai Y

6.

Cellular Defense Systems against Environmental Chemicals Kumagai Y

7.

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

Kumagai Y

8.

Bio-concentration in Fish: Benefit and Risk

Kumagai Y

9.

Industrial Chemicals and Health Effect

Shinkai Y

10. Environmental Metals and Health Effects

Shinkai Y

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the short tests after each lectures (50%) and an end-of-term examination (50%). In the above examinations, the students who got; Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read textbooks and Environmental Medicine Notes. Textbook: Environmental Medicine, Ayres, Harrison, Nichols and Maynard ed., Hodder Arnold, LD, 2010 Introduction to Environmental Toxicology: Molecular Substructures to Ecological Landscapes, Landis, Sofield and Yu ed., CRC Press, NW, 2011 Lu’s Basic Toxicology: Fundamentals, Target Organs, and Risk Assessment, 5th edition, Lu and Kacew ed., informa healthcare, NY, 2009 Notes:

57

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA130 Biochemistry And Molecular Biology Registration Number: 02RA130 Subject Name: Biochemistry And Molecular Biology Outline: Biochemistry and molecular biology are the most fundamental study to understand human biology at the molecular and cellular levels. They include the chemical structure, function, synthesis and metabolism of human biomolecules in life phenomena. They also include the study to understand the structure of the cell and the functions of cellular organelles. In this course, students should be able to establish the fundamental knowledge to deeply understand human biology. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Spring (A, B)

Monday 1

1

Room Number: Medical Sciences Building, Room 204 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Yasunori Kanaho

e-mail: ykanaho @md.tsukuba.ac.jp

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To establish the fundamental knowledge for the chemical and molecular basis of human biomolecules, their functions in life phenomena, cell structure, and the function of cellular organelles critical for maintaining the homeostasis of human body. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain chemical structures of biomolecules including nucleotides, peptides/proteins, sugars, lipids and signal molecules,

2.

To be able to explain structure of the cell and functions of cellular organelles,

3.

To be able to explain gene expression,

4.

To be able to explain transcriptional control,

5.

To be able to explain neurotransmitters,

6.

To be able to explain cell proliferation and cancer and their relation,

7.

To be able to explain molecular basis of neural network formation,

8.

To be able to discuss molecular mechanisms of various human functions.

Course Schedule: 1.

15 April:

Okamura N.,

Introduction

2.

7 May:

Fukuda A.,

Regulation of gene expression

3.

13 May:

Nakagawa Y,

Transcriptional control and metabolism 58

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 4.

20 May:

Shiomi K,

Energy metabolism and reactive oxygen species

5.

27 May:

Uchida K,

Cell proliferation and cancer

6.

3 June:

Hasegawa H,

Cytoskeleton and cell motility

7.

10 June:

Hasegawa H,

Intracellular signal transduction

8.

17 June:

Masu M,

Molecular mechanisms in neural network formation -

signal molecules 9.

24 June:

Masu K,

Molecular mechanisms in neural network formation –

extracellular environment and signal transduction Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by the final examination on the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read general textbooks of biochemistry and molecular biology. Read the textbooks, “Molecular Biology of the Cell” and “Essential Cell Biology”. Textbook: To be announced if any. Notes:

59

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA140 Molecular Cell Biology Registration Number: 02RA140 Subject Name: Molecular Cell Biology Outline: Cell is the smallest unit of all living creatures. Unraveling of its behaviors at molecular level is central for the understanding of the human biology. In this lecture, the fundamental principles and topics in the field of cell biology and evolution will be discussed so that our understanding of human biology will advance. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A, B)

Tuesday 3

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Tomoki Chiba

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To give the students the ability to explain the principles of the molecular mechanism underlying various aspects of the cells, from cell cycle to evolution. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1. To be able to explain the principles of evolution and discuss its recent topics, 2. To be able to explain the principles of cell biology at the level of molecular mechanism and discuss its recent topics. Course Schedule: 1. Introduction to Molecular Cell Biology

Chiba T

2. Evolution I

Wada H

3. Evolution II

Wada H

4. Transcription

TBA

5. Translation

Chiba T

6. Traffic

Tsuruta

7. Degradation

Chiba T

8. Cytoskeleton

Tsuruta

9. Signal Transduction

TBA

10. Cell cycle

Chiba T

Homework: 60

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the short tests or reports after each class (50%) and final examination (50%) to evaluate the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read textbooks and original articles that cover recent topics in cell biology and evolution. Textbook: “Molecular Biology of the Cell” 5th edition, Alberts B., et al (2008). “Molecular Cell Biology” 6th edition, Lodish H., et al, (2009). “Evolution” Barton N., et al, (2007) Notes:

61

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA150 Pharmacology Registration Number: 02RA150 Subject Name: Pharmacology Outline: Pharmacology is the study of bioactive molecules which alter normal or abnormal function of living organism. In this course, students understand the molecular-, cellular-, and systemslevel mechanism for the action of bioactive molecules by reading landmark original papers with great scientific and historical significance. Students also learn the methodology and logic of pharmacological inquiries through discussion with classmates and by proposing an original research plan. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A)

Friday 5 - 6

1

Room Number: Health and Medical Science Innovation Laboratory, 502 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Masashi Yanagisawa

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the mechanism for the action of bioactive molecules through critical reading of significant original papers, and by proposing an original pharmacological research project. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain bioactive molecules working through G protein-coupled receptors.

2.

To be able to explain bioactive molecules affecting brain functions, including sleep/wakefulness, anxiety and mood, appetite, and addiction.

3.

To be able to explain bioactive molecules which work on the circulatory system.

4.

To be able to present a brief overview of an original paper.

5.

To be able to present the scientific significance of original papers.

6.

To be able to ask intelligent questions about original papers presented.

7.

To be able to propose an original research plan a field of pharmacology.

Course Schedule: To be announced. Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: 62

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Students are evaluated by the quality of the presentation, discussion in the class, and the original research project. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: To be announced. Textbook: Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 12th Edition (McGrawHill Professional) Laurence Brunton, Bruce Chabner, Bjorn Knollman Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, 11th Edition, Bertram Katzung, Susan Masters, Anthony Trevor Foye's Principles of Medicinal Chemistry, 7th Edition (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins) Thomas L. Lemke Notes:

63

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA160 Basic Toxicology Registration Number: 02RA160 Subject Name: Basic Toxicology Outline: Toxicology is the study of the nature and mechanisms underlying toxic effects exerted by substances on living organisms and other biological systems. Toxicology also deals with quantitative assessment of the adverse effect in relation to the concentration of dosage, duration, and frequency of exposure of the organisms. Along with other sciences, toxicology contributes to the development of safer chemicals used as drugs, food additives, and agricultural chemicals and industrial chemicals. In this course, the students will study 1) the general aspect of toxicology (in particular, chemical toxicology and molecular toxicology), 2) biotransformation of toxicants involved in the detoxification and metabolic activation resulting in dysfunction of macromolecules and cell damage, 3) initial response and cellular protection against toxicants, and 4) toxicological evaluation. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A-C)

Wednesday 4

1

Room Number: Health and Medical Innovation Laboratory, Room 301-2 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Yoshito Kumagai

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the general concepts of toxicology based on molecular and clinical evidence. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 9. To be able to explain target organs of toxicants and typical symptoms of poisoning. 10. To be able to explain absorption, distribution, and excretion of toxicants. 11. To be able to explain metabolism and metabolic activation of toxicants. 12. To be able to explain toxicological responses to chemical insult. 13. To be able to explain oxidative stress caused by toxicant exposure. 14. To be able to explain detoxification and treatments of poisoning. 15. To be able to explain molecular basis of cellular defense systems against toxicants. 16. To be able to explain mutagenesis and carcinogenesis caused by toxicant exposure. Course Schedule: 1. Introduction to Toxicology

Kumagai Y

2. Absorption, Distribution and Excretion of Toxicants

Kumagai Y

64

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 3. Biotransformation of Toxicants: Detoxification-1

Kumagai Y

4. Biotransformation of Toxicants: Detoxification-2

Kumagai Y

5. Biotransformation of Toxicants: Metabolic Activation-1

Kumagai Y

5. Biotransformation of Toxicants: Metabolic Activation-2

Kumagai Y

6. Oxidative Stress and Toxicants

Kumagai Y

6. Cellular Protection Systems against Toxicants

Kumagai Y

7. Mutagenesis and Carcinogenesis

Kumagai Y

8. Target Organs and Toxic Substances

Shinkai Y

10. Toxicological Evaluation

Shinkai Y

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the short tests after each lectures (50%) and an end-of-term examination (50%). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read textbooks and Basic Toxicology Notes. Textbook: Lu’s Basic Toxicology: Fundamentals, Target Organs, and Risk Assessment, 5th edition, Lu and Kacew ed., informa healthcare, NY, 2009 Drug Mtabolizing Enzymes: cytochrome P450 and Other Enzymes in Drug Discovery and Development, Lee, Obach and Fisher ed., Marcel Dekker Inc., NY, 2003 Oxidative Stress in Vertebrates and Invertebrates: Molecular Aspects of Cell Signaling, Farooqni and Farooqui ed., John Wiley & Sons Inc., NJ, 2012. Notes:

65

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA170 Human Chemical Biology Registration Number: 02RA170 Subject Name: Human Chemical Biology Outline: Chemical biology is an interdisciplinary research field between chemistry and biology that involves the application of chemical techniques and tools to the study and manipulation of biological systems. Utilizing chemical principles to modulate biological systems should help to investigate the underlying Human Biology and to create new functions. In this course, students study the general aspects of Chemical Biology, Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Spectroscopic Analysis of the small molecules that are critical for living systems. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (B, C)

Tuesday 4

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Masaki Kita

e-mail: [email protected]ukuba.ac.jp

GIO (General Instructional Objective): 1.

To understand basic knowledge and concept of chemical biology through the study on organic chemistry, biochemistry, and spectroscopic analysis

2.

To learn strategies to create small molecules such as therapeutic agents and diagnostic drugs

SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the structures and functions of physiologically active molecules and natural products in terms of organic chemistry

2.

To be able to explain continuous chemical reactions of life actions and phenomena on the basis of organic and biological chemistry

3.

To be able to explain the basic principles and methods of spectroscopic analysis of organic molecules

4.

To be able to give examples and explain principles, methodologies, and significances in chemical biology

Course Schedule: 1. Introduction of Chemical Biology

Kita M

Basic Principle and General Chemistry 2. Organic Chemistry 1: Structure of Organic Molecules 66

Kigoshi H

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 3. Organic Chemistry 2: Synthesis and Reactions

Ohyoshi T

4. Organic Chemistry 3: Spectroscopic Analysis

Kita M

5. General Biochemistry

Kita M

6. Chemical Biology of Physiologically Active Substances

Kita M

Hormones, Vitamins, and Signaling Molecules 7. Chemical Biology of Natural Products

Kita M

Natural Medicines, Marine Natural Products, and Toxins 8. Chemical Biology and Bioorganic Chemistry

Kigoshi H

Tumor Promoting Agents and Antitumor Substances 9. Chemical Biology and Organic Synthesis

Ohyoshi T

Total Synthesis and Target Molecules of Natural Products 10. Current Topics in Human Chemical Biology

Kita M

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by the short tests after each class (50%) and final examination (50%) to evaluate the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read textbooks and the recent general reviews / articles on Chemical Biology. Consider the significance and novelty of the representative articles on Chemical Biology. Textbook: Reference book: McMurry et al. Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry, 6th edition, Prentice Hall, 2009 Sorrell, Organic Chemistry, 2nd edition, Univ Science Books, 2005 Hesse, Spectroscopic Methods in Organic Chemistry, Thieme Medical Pub, 2007 Schreiber, Chemical Biology: From Small Molecules to Systems Biology and Drug Design, Weinheim, Wiley-VCH, 2007. Notes:

67

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA180 Frontier Science In Drug Discovery Registration Number: 02RA180 Subject Name: Frontier Science In Drug Discovery Outline: Scientific advancements during the past two decades have created a paradigm shift in drug discovery process from the traditional approach including long experiences and contingencies to innovative methods, which are based on logical approach utilizing the latest in computational simulation technology. The recent progress includes genome-wide identification of successful drug-target proteins and in silico designing and screening of lead compounds with the techniques of combinatorial chemistry. In addition, there has been remarkable progress in the field of ADME assessment and drug delivery system. This program will be focused on the fundamentals of the process of the drug discovery and development and strengthening of medical-pharmaceutical relations. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A-C)

Wednesday 5

1

Room Number: Medical Sciences Building, Room 204 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Seiichi Tanuma

e-mail: [email protected]

Satoru Takahashi

e-mail: [email protected]

Hisashi Oishi

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): Upon completion of this course, students will be able to examine current drug discovery and development issues through various disciplines SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): Course Schedule: The following is a tentative schedule. Detail will be announced 1. Lecture 1

Seiichi Tanuma

2. Lecture 2

Kimiko Makino

3. Lecture 3

Satoru Goto

4. Lecture 4

Takashi Hirota

5. Lecture 6

Satoru Miyazaki

6. Lecture 7

Shin Aoki

7. Lecture 9

Ryoko Takasawa 68

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 8. Lecture 8

Hiromi Uchino

9. Lecture 10

Tatsuya Higashi

10. Lecture 5

Chikamasa Yamashita

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Skimming the pre-distributed files. Textbook: - Essential Clinical Anatomy, 4th edition, Moore, Agur, and Dalley, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010 - Langman’s Medical Embryology 12th edition, Sadler Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011 Notes: The lecture is not intended to present all information; students are expected to study information in the assigned textbook to supplement material presented in the lectures.

69

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA190 Mathematics For Biology Registration Number: 02RA190 Subject Name: Mathematics For Biology Outline: We discuss basics of mathematical methods in biology via simple models of biological systems. We focus on the deterministic model described by differential equations. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A, B)

Monday 5

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Kazuhiro Kawamura

e-mail: kawamura_at_math.tsukuba.ac.jp

GIO (General Instructional Objective): Understanding basic mathematics applied in biology; construction of mathematical models, their mathematical analysis and biological interpretations. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To have good understanding of basic mathematics including calculus and linear algebra,

2.

To be able to analyze the models by making use of basic mathematics,

3.

To be able to make the appropriate interpretations on the analysis from biological viewpoint,

4.

To be able to discuss these procedures from both the mathematical and the biological viewpoints.

Course Schedule: 1.

Elementary calculus and linear algebra

2.

Logistic equations

3.

Mathematical models of biological systems

4.

Differential equations

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the activities in the class, report submissions , and the final examination. The details will be announced at the beginning of the class. 70

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Reference: L.J.S. Allen, An introduction to mathematical biology, Pearson, Prentice Hall 2007 M. Braun, Differential equations and their applications, 4th ed., Springer, 1993. Notes:

71

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA200 Application Of Information Technology In Science Registration Number: 02RA200 Subject Name: Application Of Information Technology In Science Outline: Today, in science, practical use of IT is indispensable. In this course, students learn about practical use of IT in science through overlooking the computational science in a broad sense (from numerical analysis to statistics analysis and image analysis), and practical programming with Excel, Matlab (Octave), and the C language. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (C)

Intensive

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Takeshi Nagata

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To get the viewpoint of IT practical use, and apply it to their own research. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain about the benefits of the use of IT in science,

2.

To be able to explain the feature of various programming tools,

3.

To be able to choose the suitable tool for their own research,

4.

To be able to perform simple programming, and computation.

Course Schedule: 1.

Introduction to IT in science

Nagata T

2.

Practical use of the spreadsheet tool Excel [1]

Nagata T

Description and visualization of an simple mathematical formula (linear equations, statistics analysis) . 3.

Practical use of the spreadsheet tool Excel [2]

Nagata T

VBA programming (least-squares method) . 4.

Numerical computing environment Matlab(Octave) [1]

Nagata T

Introduction (multivariate statistics) 5.

Numerical computing environment Matlab(Octave) [2]

Nagata T

Various examples of numerical-analysis (frequency analysis, machine learning ). 6.

Numerical computing environment Matlab(Octave) [3]

Nagata T

Powerful visualization (3D visualization, a cell division simulation, animation). 72

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 7.

7Numerical computing environment Matlab(Octave) [4]

Nagata T

Image Processing (using Image Processing toolbox). 8.

The C language [1]

Nagata T

Introduction to The C language. 9.

The C language [2]

Nagata T

Practical use of a library (image recognition, picture composition using OpenCV) 10.

The C language [3]

Nagata T

Practice programming of a research level (pathology image processing). Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by the short tests after each class (50%) and report (50%) to evaluate the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Basic knowledge to operate the PC, especially windows OS. Textbook: Notes:

73

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA210 Basic Computational Biology Registration Number: 02RA210 Subject Name: Basic Computational Biology Outline: The goal of this lecture is to teach the students a variety of basic computational methods that can be used to solve problems in biology. We will explain different techniques to model a biological phenomenon, and algorithms to work with these models. As some examples, we will study the problems such as the phylogenetic analysis and simulations of the molecular dynamics. We will also introduce high performance computation (HPC) and component analysis as methods for biological study. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (B, C)

Thursday 1 - 2

2

Room Number: Insutitute of Engineering Science 3B, 301 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Tetsuya Sakurai

e-mail: [email protected]

Yuji Inagaki

e-mail: [email protected]

Mitsuo Shoji

e-mail: [email protected]

Shoji Makino

e-mail: [email protected]

Mitsuhisa Sato

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the structure and components a computational model of a biological phenomenon, and to learn basic computational tools and techniques that can be used to solve a wide variety of problems in the biological field. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to understand mathematical models of biological phenomenon

2.

To be able to identify what kind of methodology is necessary to solve a mathematical model (e.g. simulation, component analysis, search, optimization, etc.).

3.

To understand basic and more recent techniques for each of the methodologies mentioned above.

4.

To be able to explain the basic issues and possibilities associated with high parallel computing systems.

5.

To be able to identify what kind of problems and models can be parallelized.

6.

To be able to explain and implement a mathematical model to solve phylogeny tree problems. 74

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 7.

To be able to explain and implement a mathematical model to solve molecular dynamic problems.

8.

To be able to explain and implement a mathematical model to solve signal analysis problems

Course Schedule: 1. Theoretical methods for biology

M. Shoji

Methods and applications of classical molecular dynamics 2. Quantum mechanics for biology

M. Shoji

Methods and applications of quantum mechanical methods 3. Independent component analysis and blind signal

S. Makino

separation Basic theory of independent component analysis and its application to blind signal separation 4. Sparse component analysis and blind signal separation

S. Makino

Basic theory of sparse component analysis and its application to blind signal separation 5. High performance computing technology (1) M. Sato Parallel processing and parallel systems 6. High performance computing technology (2) M. Sato Parallel programming, and trends of high performance computing 7. Mathematical modeling and algorithms (1)

T. Sakurai

mathematical modeling and numerical simulation 8. Mathematical modeling and algorithms (2)

T. Sakurai

Computational algorithms, molecular simulation and eigenvalue solver 9. Biodiversity

Y. Inagaki

Biodiversity on earth and global eukaryotic phylogeny 10. Basics of molecular phylogeny

Y. Inagaki

Maximum-parsimony, distance, maximum-likelihood, and heuristic tree search Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Each of the reports will be evaluated individually, and given a grade between C and A. The final grade of the student will be an average of the grades of each report. Grading Criteria 75

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: The course is roughly divided in 5 sections, each supervised by one of the faculty members. Each of these sections will require a report that includes an analysis of the material over viewed during the section, and possibly a simple implementation of the models discussed. Textbook: Materials required for the understanding of each section will be distributed by the professor in class. Notes:

76

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA215 Computational Algorithms Registration Number: 02RA215 Subject Name: Computational Algorithms Outline: Lectures on algorithms and modeling for scientific computing, focusing on large-scale linear computation. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A, B)

Friday 3 - 4

2

Room Number: Laboratory of Advanced Research B, 1001 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Tetsuya Sakurai e-mail: [email protected] Hiroto Tadano

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand computational algorithms and mathematical modeling for scientific computing, focusing particularly on large-scale linear computation. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to understand the basic concept of mathematical modeling and partial differential equations

2.

To be able to explain the fundamentals of numerical linear algebra

3.

To be able to explain iterative methods for systems of linear equations

4.

To be able to explain solutions of eigenvalue problems

5.

To be able to explain parallel methods for numerical linear algebra

Course Schedule: 1. Learning to model physical phenomena, with example

T. Sakurai

applications Partial differential equations, discretization, boundary conditions 2. Mastering fundamentals relating to matrix operations

H. Tadano

Matrix norms, BLAS, LAPACK, sparse matrices 3. Understanding iterative solution techniques for linear

H. Tadano

equations Krylov subspace methods, preconditioning 4. Understanding eigenvalue solution methods

T. Sakurai

Dense matrix solution techniques, sparse matrix solution methods 77

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 5. Understanding parallelization of numerical methods Vector operations, matrix ordering, domain decomposition

H. Tadano& T. Sakurai

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Each of the reports will be evaluated individually. The final grade of the student will be an average of the grades of each report. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: The course is roughly divided in 5 sections. Three or four of these sections will require a report that includes an analysis of the material studied during the section, and possibly a simple implementation of the models discussed. Textbook: Materials required for the understanding of each section will be distributed by the professor in class. Notes:

78

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA220 High Performance Computing Technology Registration Number: 02RA220 Subject Name: High Performance Computing Technology Outline: This course introduces and explains the high performance computing technology such as parallel processing systems, processor architecture, interconnection network, numerical algorithms and performance optimization to support today’s advanced computational science/engineering from hardware level to applications. The real world high performance systems today are also introduced. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A, B)

Wednesday 2 - 3

2

Room Number: Laboratory of Advanced Research B, 1001 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Taisuke Boku

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the basic knowledge on the computing performance such as processing speed, memory and network bandwidth, interconnection performance metric, parallelization technology on hardware and software, and relationship among them for achieving high performance and large capacity computation. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain basic concept of computing performance, memory bandwidth,

interconnection latency and bandwidth, parallel processing system architecture, parallel application and numerical solution construction and their bottlenecks, 2.

To be able to explain typical high-end supercomputing system architecture and their

examples in real world, 3

.To be able to explain the typical parallelization techniques for various applications.

Course Schedule: 1. Introduction: Scientific computing and HPC

Boku T

2. Concept of bandwidth

Takahashi D

3. Basic knowledge of parallel numerical computing

Takahashi D

4. Vector processing

Boku T

5. Parallel processing architecture

Kodama Y

6. Parallel programming

Kodama Y 79

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 7. Interconnection network

Boku T

8. Case study on supercomputers

Kodama Y

9. Performance tuning

Takahashi D

10. Parallel numerical algorithm

Takahashi D

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by the report (100%) to evaluate the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read lecture notes series provided through course web site. Textbook: Lecture Note Series provided through the course website, announced at the first class of the course. Notes:

80

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA230 Reproductive Biology Registration Number: 02RA230 Subject Name: Reproductive Biology Outline: Based on the current social conditions in the world, the essential significance of “reproduction” will be concerned. Reproductive technology for the future will be also discussed ethically. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (B, C)

Tuesday 5 - 6

2

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Tadashi Baba

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To learn the continuity of life in human and other species. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to consider the importance/significance of your life,

2.

To be able to take pleasure in being alive,

3.

To be able to understand the importance/significance of living creatures and human beings on the earth.

Course Schedule: 1. Introduction to Reproductive Biology

Baba T

2. Importance/significance of Oocytes I

Kanemori Y

3. Importance/significance of Oocytes II

Kanemori Y

4. Importance/significance of Sperm I

Kashiwabara S

5. Importance/significance of Sperm II

Kashiwabara S

6. Importance/significance of Fertilization

Baba T

7. Importance/significance of Embryos

Baba T

8. Importance/significance of Reproductive Technology I

BabaT

9. Importance/significance of Reproductive Technology II

BabaT

10. Importance/significance of Reproductive Technology III

Baba T

Homework:

81

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by short tests after each class (100%). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read general textbooks. Textbook: Not specified. Notes:

82

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA231 Gene Engineering and Genetically Modified Mice Registration Number: 02RA231 Subject Name: Gene Engineering and Genetically Modified Mice Outline: There is great advance in gene engineering in the last decade, for example, introducing exogenous genes in to the genome and genome editing by using artificial enzymes. In this subject, these new technologies are introduced to the students. In addition, students study detail about generation method of genetically modified mice based on these technologies and its application for biomedical researches. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Tuesday 5

1

Room Number: Institute of Medicine 4A104 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Satoru Takahashi

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the general technical viewpoints and concepts of gene engineering methods and to learn strategies for generation methods of genetically modified mice. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain history of gene engineering,

2.

To be able to explain virus mediated gene transfer,

3.

To be able to explain working mechanism of artificial nucleases, for example Zinc finger nuclease and TALEN,

4.

To be able to explain generation method for transgenic mice,

5.

To be able to explain generation method for knock-out mice,

6.

To be able to explain generation method for conditional knock-out mice,

Course Schedule: 1. Introduction to gene engineering, History

Takahashi S

2. Gene transfer method to the cells

Ema M

3. Gene transfer method by using virus vectors

Oishi H

4. Artificial nuclease, Zinc finger nuclease, TALEN

Oishi H

5. Generation method for transgenic mice

Takahashi S

6. Generation method for knock-out mice

Takahashi S

7. Generation method for conditional knock-out mice

Takahashi S

83

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 8. Generation method for induced pluripotent stem cells 9. Application of genetically modified mice

Ema M Ema M

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by Class attendance and participation (50%) and final examination (50%) to evaluate the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read handouts of the classes and related papers. Textbook: To be announced if any. Notes:

84

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA232 Epigenome Physiology Registration Number: 02RA232 Subject Name: Epigenome Physiology Outline: Genome remains largely unchanged in most cells of an organism through its entire life. On the other hand, epigenome is dynamic during development and differentiation to determine and maintain cell-specific gene expression profiles that define cellular identity and function. The epigenome is composed of all genome-wide chromatin modifications, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, which are labile during development and altered in disease. This course provides an introduction in physiology regulated by epigemic function. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (C)

Monday 5 Time:TBA

1

Monday 6 Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Aki Fukamizu

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the differential roles between genome and epigenome for biological significance and to learn their physiological functions. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to read papers regarding the epigenomic regulation,

2.

To be able to have the presentation (by power point) and explain the physiological and/or pathological roles for epigeme function in diseases,

3.

To be able to discuss with and evaluate the point of views presented by the students who take the course.

Course Schedule: 1. Introduction to genomic and epigenomic functions

Fukamizu A

2. Example Presentations

Fukamizu A

3. Presentations by students (1)

Fukamizu A

4. Presentations by students (2)

Fukamizu A

5. Presentations by students (3)

Fukamizu A

6. Summary

Fukamizu A

7. Presentations by students (4)

Fukamizu A 85

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 8. Presentations by students (5)

Fukamizu A

9. Presentations by students (6)

Fukamizu A

10. Overview

Fukamizu A

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the presentation (50%) and discussion (25%), and the results of peer reviews (25%) listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Choose and read original papers regarding epigenome. Prepare and make the presentation, by power point, about the papers you read. Discuss and evaluate the presentations. Textbook: No textbook is required. Notes:

86

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA233 Signal Transduction And Drug Design Registration Number: 02RA233 Subject Name: Signal Transduction And Drug Design Outline: Signal transduction is the intracellular reaction, which is triggered by the activation of various types of membrane receptors in response to bio-active molecules, and regulates cell functions. It is also closely related to diseases: disturbance of signal transduction generally causes diseases. Therefore, knowledge of signal transduction is essential to understand human biology. This course is designed to assist the students to understand the molecular mechanism of signal transduction and its related diseases. In addition, students could be able to establish the basic knowledge of drug design and development through learning signal transduction and its related diseases. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (B, C)

Thursday 2

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Yasunori Kanaho

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand how cells exert their physiological functions at the molecular level and which defect in signal transduction causes diseases. To understand how new drugs are developed and how effective drugs are designed. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain major signal transduction systems,

2.

To be able to explain what kinds of biomolecules are involved in signal transduction,

3.

To be able to explain what defects in signal transduction cause cancer,

4.

To be able to explain the relation between signal transduction and allergy,

5.

To be able to the relation of signal transduction with diabetes,

6.

To be able to explain the concept to develop new drugs,

7.

To be able to explain the concept to develop anti-cancer drugs.

Course Schedule: 1.

5/23 (Thu): Introduction of Signal Transduction and Drug Design

Kanaho Y

2.

5/30 (Thu): Membrane Receptors and G proteins

Kanaho Y

3.

6/6 (Thu): Cancer and Signal Transduction

Funakoshi Y

87

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 4.

6/13 (Thu): Allergy and Signal Transduction

Tahara S

5.

6/20 (Thu): Diabetes and Signal Transduction

Shimano H

Signal Transduction in Diabetes and energy metabolism 6.

6/27 (Thu): Concept to Develop New Drugs

Hasegawa H

7.

7/4 (Thu): Anti-Cancer Drugs

Hongu T

8.

7/11 (Thu): Anti-Allergy Drugs

Sibuya A

9.

7/18 (Thu): Drug Design to Develop Efficient Drugs I

Sato T

10.

7/25 (Thu): Drug Design to Develop Efficient Drugs II

Fujii I

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by the final examination on the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read manuscripts related to signal transduction and its related diseases. Discuss with classmates on how efficient new drugs can be developed. Textbook: To be announced if any. Notes: To be announced if any.

88

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA234 Stem Cell Therapy Registration Number: 02RA234 Subject Name: Stem Cell Therapy Outline: In this class, students read the latest original articles on regenerative medicine and stem cell biology and perform presentation. Students are expected to understand research purpose, methods, results, and to have a discussion about significance or problem of the article. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (B, C)

Thursday 3

1

Room Number: Medical Sciences Building, Room 204 Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: * Osamu Ohneda

e-mail: [email protected]

Masumi Nagano

e-mail: [email protected]

Toshiharu Yamashita

e-mail: [email protected]

* responsible person GIO (General Instructional Objective): The objective of this class is to learn basic knowledge and the latest research progress on regenerative medicine and stem cell biology fields by reading original articles. In addition, this class aims to improve individual ability to extract the point at issue of the article and discuss with other participants. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to find and select the appropriate original article from major scientific journals by using online searching system,

2.

To be able to read and understand the contents of the article, prepare document for the presentation, review the findings of the article within a limited time period

3.

To be able to understand the explanation of the presenter, ask question, and have discussion about significance of the articles or problems to be solved,

4.

To be able to value the importance and scientific position of the selected articles in the related research field.

Course Schedule: Homework: 89

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by the achievement of the objectives listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Continuous search and reading of related article to follow the latest findings on regenerative medicine and stem cell biology. Textbook: Research articles. Reference book: Handbook of Stem Cells Vol1 and 2, Edited by Robert Lanza, ELSEVIER Academic Press. Notes:

90

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA235 Analysis Of Machineries In Human Biology Registration Number: 02RA235 Subject Name: Analysis Of Machineries In Human Biology Outline: Analysis of machineries in human biology is the study of advanced translational research from basic to clinic. In this course, the students understand the cutting-edge technologies and solutions in the field of advanced molecular medicine. The students also learn world-leading technologies by reading the original papers with scientific significance and by utilizing most advanced analytical instruments. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Wednesday 3

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Taka-Aki Sato

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the most advanced molecular analysis by the next generation of world-leading precision instruments and to learn their clinical applications to detect and isolate molecular biomarkers in human disease. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the necessity of research and development of molecular diagnostic systems, including mass spectrometry, optical imaging, PET, CT, SPECT, and MRI,

2.

To be able to explain the cutting-edge technologies and solutions of the advanced molecular analytical instruments,

3.

To be able to present a brief overview of an original paper,

4.

To be able to present a scientific significance of an original paper,

5.

To be able to propose an original research project in the field of molecular diagnostics using the advanced molecular analytical instruments,

6.

To be able to utilize the advanced molecular analytical instruments for each basic scientific project.

Course Schedule: May 15, 22, 29, June 5, 19, 26, July 3, 10, 17, 31 1.

Introduction to Advanced Molecular Diagnostic System 91

Sato TA

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 2.

Introduction of Mass Spectrometry (MS)

TBC and Sato TA

3.

Application of Mass Spectrometry (proteome)

TBC and Sato TA

4.

Application of Mass Spectrometry (metabolome)

TBC and Sato TA

5.

Application of Mass Spectrometry (genome)

TBC and Sato TA

6.

Application of Mass Spectrometry (MS imaging)

TBC and Sato TA

7.

Optical imaging and PET/CT/SPECT/MRI

TBC and Sato TA

8.

Development of molecular probe

TBC and Sato TA

9.

Molecular imaging of cancer

TBC and Sato TA

10.

Translating optical imaging into the clinic

TBC and Sato TA

TBN: To be confirmed Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by scientific quality of their presentations, discussions in the class, and their qualifications are determined by accomplishment of the original research projects. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: To be announced. Textbook: N/A Notes:

92

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA236 Environmental Health Science, Toxicology And Exposure Assessment Registration Number: 02RA236 Subject Name: Environmental Health Science, Toxicology And Exposure Assessment Outline: As a result of industrial activities, human and non-human organisms are exposed to various types of chemicals (e.g., pesticide residues on food, contaminants in drinking water). Risk assessment is the quantitative estimate of potential effects of these chemicals on human health and environmental significance based on its hazard and exposure level. In this course, students study the general aspects of (1) assessment of hazard and exposure, (2) mechanistic interpretation of hazard identified in experimental animals and its human relevance, and (3) cutting edge techniques in this field. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (B)

Intensive (Friday, 4-5)

1

Room Number: 706 Laboratory of Advanced Research A Building Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Tomoya Yamada

e-mail: [email protected]

GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the general viewpoints and concepts of risk assessment based on science and regulation and to learn strategies for decision-making processes in risk assessment. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain how to identify hazard of chemicals to human and non-human organisms,

2.

To be able to explain how to assess fate, exposure, hazard and risk of chemicals for the environment,

3.

To be able to explain the mechanistic interpretation of chemical hazard identified in experimental animals and its human relevance,

4.

To be able to explain cutting edge techniques in hazard identification and exposure assessment,

5.

To be able to do risk assessment.

Course Schedule: 1. Introduction to risk assessment

Saito S.

2. Test methods of Hazard Identification in mammalian toxicity 93

Yamada T.

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 3. ADME (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion)

Nagahori H.

4. Dose-response analyses, Brush up & Practice

Yamada T.

5. Mechanistic interpretation of hazard (e.g. Carcinogenicity)

Yamada T.

6. Alternative methods using cutting edge techniques (ex. iPS & ES cells etc.) Saito K. 7-8. Fate, Exposure, Hazard, and Risk assessment for the environment

Fujisawa T.

9. Setting scenarios, Exposure assessment for workers and consumers, Risk characterization Saito S. 10. Brushup & Practice etc.

Saito S./Fujisawa T./Yamada T.

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by Class attendance and participation (50%) and final examination (50%) to evaluate the knowledge listed in the SBO. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Read textbooks, information on the Web, and literatures. Practice of evaluation of hazard and assessment of human risk using related data provided by faculty. Textbook: 

Casarett & Doull’s Toxicology: The Basic Science of Poisons, 7th edition, Klaassen CD ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 2008 (8th edition will be published soon).



S.E. Manahan: Environmental Chemistry, Lewis Publisher, 7th edition



Global Product Strategy;ICCA Guidance on Chemical Risk Assessment,

Notes: Environmental Medicine, one of the subjects provided in 1st year, should also be completed.

94

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA240 Basic Experiments In Human Biology Registration Number: 02RA240 Subject Name: Basic Experiments In Human Biology Outline: In this subject, at four research laboratories headed by program professors, students learn the outline of each research and basic experimental methods/research concepts and perform elementary experiments/simulation. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Spring (A, B)

Intensive

4

Room Number: Laboratory of each professor Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Akira Shibuya ([email protected]), core professors of this program GIO (General Instructional Objective): At four research laboratories headed by program professors for one week each, students learn the outline of each research based on the professor’s lecture and understand basic experimental methods/research concepts and their principles. In addition, students deepen the above understanding by performing elementary experiments/simulation. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1. To understand the background and outline of each research content 2. To understand basic experimental methods/simulation by discussion with researchers and collection of papers/books related to the research 3. To perform an elementary experiment/simulation to deepen the understanding Course Schedule: Students attend 4 courses (Grade C), and understand the background and outline of each research content by reading papers related to three topics and discussing with researchers (Grade B). Students carry out elementary experiments and make reports adequately (Grade A). Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Grading Criteria 95

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Follow instruction s given by each professor Notes:

96

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA241 Basic Experiments In Human Biology Registration Number: 02RA241 Subject Name: Basic Experiments In Human Biology Outline: In this subject, at four research laboratories headed by program professors, students learn the outline of each research and basic experimental methods/research concepts and perform elementary experiments/simulation. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A, B)

Intensive

4

Room Number: Laboratory of each professor Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: Akira Shibuya ([email protected]), core professors of this program GIO (General Instructional Objective): At four research laboratories headed by program professors for one week each, students learn the outline of each research based on the professor’s lecture and understand basic experimental methods/research concepts and their principles. In addition, students deepen the above understanding by performing elementary experiments/simulation. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1. To understand the background and outline of each research content 2. To understand basic experimental methods/simulation by discussion with researchers and collection of papers/books related to the research 3. To perform an elementary experiment/simulation to deepen the understanding Course Schedule: Students attend 4 courses (Grade C), and understand the background and outline of each research content by reading papers related to three topics and discussing with researchers (Grade B). Students carry out elementary experiments and make reports adequately (Grade A). Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Grading Criteria 97

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: Follow instruction s given by each professor Notes:

98

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA250 Special Lectures In Human Biology I Registration Number: 02RA250 Subject Name: Special Lectures In Human Biology I Outline: Special Lectures in Human Biology I provides the opportunities for the students to attend the research progress meetings of several laboratories, which offers candidate area of study that the students will aspire to focus on. Featuring the latest research presentation, the students will have discussions on its research achievements, learn professional knowledge, and develop their skills to proceed with research activities. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A-C)

Irregular

1

Room Number: To be announced Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the aims, objectives, materials and methods of the researches, and latest research achievements in selected laboratories. To discuss the presented research achievements with presenters and attendants in the meetings. To figure out the students’ focused areas of research. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the objectives and recent achievements of the researches in the

selected laboratories, 2.

To be able to explain the materials and methods of the researches in the selected

laboratories, 3.

To discuss on the presented research achievements,

4.

To make short reports on the attended research progress meetings,

5.

To figure out the research of students’ focused areas.

Course Schedule: 1.

Send an e-mail to the responsible faculty members, and decide the schedule of research progress meetings to attend,

2.

Attend at least three meetings per each laboratory (i.e., a total of more than 10 meetings are required to attend.),

3.

Make a list and a one page report on each attended meeting,

4.

Make a final report on the research of students’ focused areas. 99

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

Homework: Discuss with the presenters and attendants of the research progress meetings. Figure out what researches are conducted in the attended laboratories. Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by their portfolios, including a final report, a list of attended meetings, and a total of more than ten pages report on the attended meetings (i.e., a one page report per each meeting). In addition, the students who; -

Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further contribute others’ study by useful

discussions in the meetings, and make an excellent final report on the research of their focused area are evaluated as Superior (S; top 10%), -

Have active discussions at the attended meetings are evaluated as Excellent (A; upper

25%), -

Create good portfolios describing good understanding of attended meeting are

evaluated as Good (B), -

Submit their portfolios with required contents pass the examination, and are evaluated

as Average or upper grades (C or upper grades). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: None Notes:

100

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA260 Special Seminars In Human Biology I Registration Number: 02RA260 Subject Name: Special Seminars In Human Biology I Outline: Special Seminars in Human Biology I provides the opportunities for the students to attend the journal clubs of several laboratories, which offers candidate area of study that the students will aspire to focus on. Featuring the latest original research papers, the students should be able to understand its research objectives, methods, and results, and also to have discussions on its meanings, problems, and issues facing the research. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A-C)

Irregular

1

Room Number: To be announced Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the world standard of published papers in the candidate area of study. To have discussions on its meanings, problems, and issues facing the research. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the research objectives, methods, and results of the selected research papers in the journal clubs,

2.

To be able to explain the meanings and problems of the research papers,

3.

To discuss on issues remained in the research field after reading selected research papers,

4.

To make short reports on each selected research paper,

5.

To figure out world standard of the research papers in the candidate area of study.

Course Schedule: 1.

Send an e-mail to the responsible faculty members, and decide the schedule of attending journal clubs,

2.

Attend at least three journal clubs per each laboratory (i.e., a total of more than 10 journal clubs are required to attend.),

3.

Make a list and a one page report on each research paper read in the journal clubs,

4.

Make a final report on the current problems and issues to be elucidated in the students’ candidate study field.

101

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Homework: Discuss with the presenters and attendants of the attended journal clubs. Figure out what researches are being conducted in the world. Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the portfolios, including a final report, a list of research papers addressed in the journal clubs, and a total of more than ten page reports on research papers addressed in the journal clubs (i.e., a one page report per each journal club). In addition, the students who; -

Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further contribute others’ study by useful

discussions in the journal clubs and make an excellent final report on the present status of selected research field in the world are evaluated as A+: top 10%. -

Make active discussions on the research papers at the journal clubs are evaluated as

A; upper 25%. -

Make a good portfolio describing good explanation for research papers are evaluated

as B. -

Submit the portfolios with required contents pass the examination and are evaluated as

C or upper grades. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: None Notes:

102

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA270 Special Research In Human Biology I Registration Number: 02RA270 Subject Name: Special Research In Human Biology I Outline: In the Special research in human biology I course, the students will practically understand the principles and methods of research skills in several laboratories, which offer candidate area of study that the students will aspire to focus on. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A-C)

Irregular

1

Room Number: Laboratory of each professor Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the practical skills for research experiments, evaluation of each experimental result, decision of the next experiment, and practical management of the laboratory. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to practice specific experiments,

2.

To make well-organized daily experimental notes and systemic protocols,

3.

To be able to evaluate the experimental results,

4.

To be able to make a decision to proceed the projects or modify the conditions of current experiments,

5.

To strictly observe the rules on common samples, discards, equipment usages and so on.

Course Schedule: 1.

Send an e-mail to the responsible faculty members and decide the schedule of attending research practices,

2.

Attend experiments at each laboratory for at least one week (note: a total of more than three laboratories are required to attend.),

3.

Practice experiments together with faculty members or PhD students,

4.

Make daily experimental notes and systemic protocols.

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: 103

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology The students are evaluated by the practical skills and the files of experimental notes and systemic protocols. In addition, the students who; -

Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further keep attention to the rules and make

contribution for the management of the laboratory works are evaluated as Superior (A+: top 10%). -

Make active discussions on the experimental methods and results are evaluated as

Excellent (A; upper 25%). -

Make reliable experiments and well-organized notes and protocols are evaluated as

Good (B). -

Attend the scheduled experiments and submit the files of experimental notes and

systemic protocols pass the examination and are evaluated as Average or upper (C or upper grades). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: None Notes:

104

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA271 Special Lectures In Human Biology II Registration Number: 02RA271 Subject Name: Special Lectures In Human Biology II Outline: Special Lectures in Human Biology II provides the opportunity for the students to attend the research progress meetings of the particular laboratory which offers specialized areas of study that the students will aspire to focus on. Featuring the latest research presentations, the students will have discussions on research achievements, learn professional knowledge, and develop their advanced skills to proceed with research activities. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Irregular

1

Room Number: To be announced Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the aims, objectives, materials and methods of the researches, and latest research achievements in the supervisor’s laboratory. To discuss the presented research achievements with presenters and attendants in the meetings. To learn how to proceed with the research activities in the area of study that the students will aspire to focus on. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the objectives and recent achievements of the researches in the supervisor’s laboratory,

2.

To be able to explain the materials and methods of the researches in the supervisor’s laboratory,

3.

To discuss on the presented research achievements,

4.

To make short reports on the attended research progress meetings,

5.

To figure out the strategy for proceed with the research activities.

Course Schedule: 1.

Attend the progress meetings of the supervisor’s laboratory and discuss with presenters and attendants about the researches in the laboratory,

2.

Make a one page report on each attended meeting,

3.

Make a final report on the research of students’ focused areas.

Homework: 105

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology Discuss with the presenters and attendants of the research progress meetings in the supervisor’s group. Figure out what researches are conducted in the laboratories. Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the attendances and activities of the discussion in the progress meetings and their portfolios, including a final report and short reports on the attended meetings. In addition, the students who; -

Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further contribute others’ study by useful

discussions in the meetings, and make an excellent final report on the research of their focused area are evaluated as Superior (S; top 10%), -

Have active discussions at the attended meetings are evaluated as Excellent (A; upper

25%), -

Create good portfolios describing good understanding of attended meeting are

evaluated as Good (B), -

Submit their portfolios with required contents pass the examination, and are evaluated

as Average or upper grades (C or upper grades). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: None Notes:

106

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA272 Special Seminars In Human Biology II Registration Number: 02RA272 Subject Name: Special Seminars In Human Biology II Outline: Special Seminars in Human Biology II provides the opportunities for the students to attend the journal clubs of laboratories which are organized by students’ supervisor. Featuring the latest original research papers, the students should be to have discussions on its meanings, problems, and issues facing the research, and to make original ideas which develop the research papers. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Irregular

1

Room Number: Day and Time, and Room Number are depends on responsible supervisors. Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the world standard of published papers in the research field where students selected. To have discussions on its meanings, problems, and issues facing the research. To cultivate the ability to gather knowledge and technical information which develop the students’ thesis. To develop the technique to make a presentation. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1. To be able to explain the meanings, problems of the research papers, 2. To discuss on issues remained in the research papers in journal clubs, 3. To make presentation to introduce the latest original research papers in the journal clubs, 4. To make idea to develop the research papers which students addressed. 5. To make short report on students presented research paper in the journal clubs. Course Schedule: 1. Attend every journal clubs in the laboratory. 2. have a presentation in the journal clubs. 3. make a report on the paper which students addressed in the journal clubs. Homework: Discuss with the laboratory members in the journal clubs. Make original idea to develop 107

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology students’ own research. Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the report of the research papers which students addressed in the journal clubs. The report should includes short introduction of the paper (background, objectives, results and discussions), and its meanings, problems, and issues facing the research, and also original idea to improve or to develop the research. In addition, the students who; - Fulfill the requirements for grad A and B further contribute others’ study by useful discussions in the journal clubs and make an excellent report are evaluated as A+: top 10%. - Make active discussions on the research papers at the journal clubs and make a good report describing good discussion for research paper are evaluated as A; upper 25%. - Make a good report describing good discussion for research paper are evaluated as B. - Submit the report with required contents pass the examination, and are evaluated as C or upper grades. Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: None Notes:

108

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA273 Special Research In Human Biology II Registration Number: 02RA273 Subject Name: Special Research In Human Biology II Outline: In the Special research in human biology II course, the students understand the research background, make an experimental design of the project, and do the experiments for their thesis. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Irregular

1

Room Number: Laboratory of each professor Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: GIO (General Instructional Objective): To understand the design for research, evaluation of results, decision of the next experiment, and practical skills for presentation. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to make a design of the project,

2.

To be able to evaluate the experimental results,

3.

To be able to make a decision to proceed the project,

4.

To be able to discuss about the experimental results with faculty member and lab members,

5.

To be able to give the presentation and discussion under the proper research background.

Course Schedule: 1.

Design the project and do the experiments,

2.

Make a decision to proceed the project.

3.

Give the presentation and discussion in lab meeting

Homework: Grading Methods and Criteria: Students are evaluated by the design of project, practical skills and results of experiment, and presentation. In addition, the students who; 109

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology - Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further give the presentation and discussion under the proper research background will be evaluated as Superior (A+: top 10%). - Make well-organized results and active discussion will be evaluated as Excellent (A; upper 25%). - Make well-organized project design and reliable experiments will be evaluated as Good (B). - Design the project and organized daily experiments are evaluated as Average or upper (C or upper grades). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: None Notes:

110

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA280 Special Practice In Human Biology I Registration Number: 02RA280 Subject Name: Special Practice In Human Biology I Outline: In the Special Practice in Human Biology I, the students will learn methods to acquire basic knowledge required for selecting a topic for their dissertation through tutorials with their mentoring instructors. The students select the subject for their research through discussion with initial mentoring instructors and possible research supervisors, determine approaches for conducting the research, go through application procedures necessary for the research such as animal experiments and genetic recombination, and then plan their dissertation. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

1

Fall (A-C)

Irregular

2

Room Number: Laboratory of each professor Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: GIO (General Instructional Objective): To become proficient at accumulating basic knowledge and information on global problems and their research status in the field aspiring to select as a topic for dissertation. To list up the required research methods, regulations and application procedures necessary for the researches. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the world trends to solve global problems,

2.

To be able to explain the significance of the selected research subjects in the world,

3.

To be able to explain research methods required to conduct the researches,

4.

To be able to explain regulations and application procedures required for the

researches. Course Schedule: 1.

Discuss with initial mentoring instructors about the global problems to be solved, and learn how to find textbooks, research papers, and other academic reports useful for deeper understanding of the problems,

2.

Make appointments with possible research supervisors and any other people in the world, and discuss about the possible approaches to solve the global problems,

3.

Study regulations and application procedures required for thesis researches under the supervision of initial mentoring instructors and the candidate research supervisors. 111

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology 4.

Submit project proposals.

Homework: Discuss with classmates about global problems to be solved. Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the project proposals, including Backgrounds, Global Problems to be solved, objectives of the PhD program in Human Biology, Methods, Required Regulations and Application Procedures, and expected results and the significances. In addition, the students who; -

Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further provide an excellent original idea to

approach global problems are evaluated as Superior (A+: top 10%); -

Make a significant and feasible proposals are evaluated as Excellent (A; upper 25%);

-

Make a good project proposals from the significant points of view are evaluated as

Good (B). -

Submit the project proposals with required contents pass the examination and are

evaluated as Average or upper grades (C or upper grades). Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: None Notes:

112

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

02RA281 Special Practice In Human Biology II Registration Number: 02RA281 Subject Name: Special Practice In Human Biology II Outline: In the Special Practice in Human Biology II, the student should be able to acquire 1) methods for evaluation of each result of their researches led to their dissertation writing, 2) skills to develop and modify their research plan and conduct their research based on the plan, and 3) skills to write their dissertation from accumulated research results. The students conduct their own research through discussion with research supervisors. Year

Semester (Module)

Day and Period,

Credit

2

Spring (A-C)

Irregular

10

Room Number: Laboratory of each professor Responsible Faculty Member and Contact Information: GIO (General Instructional Objective): To become proficient at accumulating broad knowledge and information on global problems and their research status in the field aspiring to select as a topic for dissertation. To acquire methods for evaluation of each result of their researches based on the plan led to their dissertation writing. SBO (Specific Behavioral Objectives): 1.

To be able to explain the significance of the selected research subjects in the world,

2.

To be able to acquire skills to develop and modify their research plan and conduct their research based on the plan,

3.

To be able to conduct their own researches and acquire skills to write their dissertation from accumulated research results.

Course Schedule: 1.

According to the submitted project proposals in the Special Practice in Human Biology I, learn the skills to develop and modify their research plan through discussion with research supervisors,

2.

Conduct their own research under the supervision of research supervisors,

3.

Learn the skills to write their dissertation from accumulated research results,

4.

Summarize the progress report.

Homework: 113

Ph.D. Program in Human Biology

Grading Methods and Criteria: The students are evaluated by the report on progress, including Backgrounds, Global Problems to be solved, objectives of the PhD program in Human Biology, Methods, Results, the Significances, and further Perspectives. In addition, the students who; -

Fulfill the requirements for grade A and B further provide an excellent original idea to

approach global problems are evaluated as Superior (A+: top 10%); -

Make a significant and feasible progress reports are evaluated as Excellent (A; upper

25%); -

Make a good progress reports from the significant points of view are evaluated as

Good (B). -

Submit the progress reports with required contents pass the examination and are

evaluated as Average or upper grades (C or upper grades).

Grading Criteria A+: Superior (more than 90: top 10%) A: Excellent (80-89: upper 20%) B: Good (70-79) C: Average (60-69) D: Failure (less than 60) Assignment: Textbook: None Notes:

114