College of Life and Natural Sciences

Psychology is housed within the College of Life and Natural Sciences (CLANS). The psychology subject area first came into being in 1994 and offers a n...

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College of Life and Natural Sciences

 

PROGRAMME HANDBOOK for

BSc (Hons) Psychological Studies

2017-2018

     

CONTENTS Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….…..1 •   The First week and beyond ……………………………………………………….....2 •   Textbook and pre-reading …………………………………………………..…….…2 Structure of Degree Course

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•   Programme title …………………………………………………………………………….3 •   Final award ……………………………………………………………………………………….3 •   Programme overview ……………………………………………………………………..3 Ø   External benchmarks …………………………………………………………...3 Ø   Rationale ……………………………………………………………………………...3 •   Programme Aims and Learning Outcomes …………………………………..…4 •   Program Timetable ………………………………………………………………………....5 Assessment Regulations of Undergraduate Programmes …………………………………...6 •   •   •   •   •   •   •   •  

Assessment of your psychology degree …………………………………….....6 Module marks …………………………………………………………………………….……6 Summary of Assessment deadlines ……………………………………………….6 Failing modules ……………………………………………………………………………....7 Referral in an assessment component …………………………………………..7 Deferral …………………………………………………………………………………………..7 Exceptional Extenuating Circumstances, AED & late submissions….7 Retaking modules ………………………………………………………………………….…8

Classification of Awards ……………………………………………………………………………………….9 •   Degree Classification ………………………………………………………………………9 Student Responsibilities to assessment …………………………………………………………..…9 •   Understanding what is expected …………………………………………………...9 •   Academic offences …………………………………………………………………………..9 •   Policy for Late Entry to Classes by students ………………………………….9 Student Support Service …………………………………………………………………………………..10 •   Communication and Being Green ……………………………………………….10

   

INTRODUCTION On behalf of the psychology team it is my pleasure to welcome you to the BSc (Hons) Psychology programme; I hope you enjoy your studies with us. The University of Derby traces its origin to the Diocesan Institute for School Mistresses founded in 1851 which, following a series of mergers with various institutions providing courses in arts, technology and education, led to the creation of the Derbyshire College of Higher Education in 1983. The College gained University status in 1992. Following a reorganisation in 2014, the university is divided into nine colleges, each housing a number of related disciplines. Psychology is housed within the College of Life and Natural Sciences (CLANS). The psychology subject area first came into being in 1994 and offers a number of awards at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The BSc (Hons) Psychology degree has been available since 1994. Within this handbook you’ll find a full description of the BSc Psychology degree, including its aims, the learning outcomes you will achieve and the teaching and assessment methods used on the programme. This handbook will also tell you about the essential modules that you have to take. Last, but not least, you’ll also find information about various university procedures. You should expect to dip into the handbook at regular intervals throughout your time on the programme. You should, however, read through the whole document at least once, so that you are familiar with what is in here, and know where to look when you need to find information. The following information in this handbook will supply you with the relevant information and links for you to complete your year of study.

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The First Week And Beyond You must attend your course from the very first day. The first week is extremely important for new students as it provides you with a valuable opportunity to orientate yourself and to make new friends. During this time, you will be given information required for successful study with Aventis and University of Derby, there will be lectures, presentations and activities to help introduce you to your degree course and to each other.

During the first day of class, you will be given a Course Syllabus for each of your core modules. There will be detail information about the module including the teaching schedule and assessment details. It is useful to look at the assessment details early on so that you can plan your work in advance.

When you get your course timetable, you will notice that the vast majority of your time will not be spent in class sessions. Please remember that this is a part time course and that you are expected to do your own independent learning outside of class contact hours. It is expected that you will spend between 35 and 40 hours per week on your study for each module, of which at least 50 per cent will be independent study. Obviously, how you manage your time and organise your independent learning outside of contact hours is up to you but do not be tempted to omit the independent study.

Text Books and Pre-Reading Many students feel that they would like to get started on their reading before the semester begins. The modules in the Psychological Studies program covers a wide range of topic area, the University do not suggest a set text for each module; instead there will be recommended books and journals listed in each module handbook. It is also advised that, you do the following to help prepare for your course:

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Either continue, or get into the habit of, reading a serious newspaper and following news and current affairs programmes on the radio or television. You will find a number of your subjects easier if your general knowledge is sound.

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Take any opportunity to advance your computer abilities. You will need to be capable of word-processing your work and using spreadsheets.

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STRUCTURE OF DEGREE COURSE Programme title: BSc (Hons) Psychological Studies Final award: Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Psychological Studies Stage three of the programme is delivered as a top-up award by Aventis School of Management in Singapore. Students who complete that programme will graduate with the award of Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Psychological Studies. Students who do not achieve enough credits for an honours degree, but meet the requirements for this award will be awarded a Bachelor of Science in Psychological Studies.

Programme overview  

External benchmarks and accreditation  

The BSc Psychological Studies degree is designed to comply with the Quality Assurance Agency for higher education subject benchmarks for psychology. Rationale   The BSc Psychology Studies degree is designed for students who wish to specialise in psychology but require greater flexibility than is possible within a programme which meets the requirements of the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership of the British Psychological Society. In order to do this the programme was developed to provide broad and detailed knowledge of theories and applications within contemporary psychology. Consistent with the university's teaching and learning strategy, the programme is also intended to provide students with a coherent range of transferable skills. These will include an appreciation of the application of psychological knowledge and techniques; information technology; critical thinking; the ability to work both independently and co-operatively; and effective communication and presentation skills. The course is also intended to produce graduates who can compete effectively in the graduate careers market, though engagement in personal development planning and supporting activities.

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Programme Aims and Learning Outcomes.   The degree BSc (Hons) Psychological Studies is designed for students who wish to specialise in psychology and is therefore designed to be distinctive in the range, depth and integration of skills, knowledge and applications of psychology offered. This programme aims to provide a substantial training in the discipline and to allow students to develop a wide range of skills and knowledge that will prepare them for a range of vocational destinations. Specifically the degree focuses particularly on equipping students with: •   a scientific understanding of the breadth of contemporary psychological theories, findings and debates and of the ways in which psychological knowledge can be applied; •   an understanding of research methodologies associated with psychological investigation, and their applications, as well as an appreciation of the professional, ethical and scientific responsibilities associated with psychological enquiry; •   the ability to critically evaluate theories, research findings and applications in psychology; •   a coherent range of subject-specific and transferable skills which can facilitate continued personal and professional development; Students who successfully complete the BSc (Hons) Psychological Studies programme will meet the following learning outcomes, commensurate with level H in the framework for higher education qualifications. Outcomes are grouped into the four headings of Knowledge and Understanding, Intellectual Skills, SubjectSpecific Skills, and Transferable skills. Knowledge and Understanding 1.   Students will be able to demonstrate a comprehensive and critical knowledge of the scientific basis of psychology. 2.   Students will be able to demonstrate a comprehensive and critical understanding of contemporary knowledge, methods and practices of psychology as a theoretical and as an applied discipline in a range of areas within the discipline. Intellectual Skills 1.   Students will be able to demonstrate a thorough grasp of the fundamental concepts of psychological analysis and explanation, including multiple psychological perspectives, and an ability to apply those concepts to a broad range of topics. 2.   Students will be able to demonstrate critical, analytical and creative abilities in scholarly thinking, problem solving, and communication as a result of their engagement with course material and their involvement in the planning, execution, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of independent research within psychology.

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Subject-specific skills 1.   Students will be able to select and synthesise appropriate psychological literature to the investigation of psychological phenomena. 2.   Students will be able to demonstrate an appreciation of the professional, ethical and scientific responsibilities associated with psychological enquiry. Transferable skills 1.   Students will be able to use information technology effectively and be familiar with a range of relevant applications. 2.   Students will be able to confidently communicate complex ideas and findings in a variety of modalities 3.   Students will be able to demonstrate personal skills relating to interpersonal communication, leadership and teamwork as a consequence of reflexive application of psychological knowledge. 4.   Students will be capable of independent learning, demonstrating effective planning and project management skills.

Programme timetable   The top-up programme is designed to be taken over a nine months period. Typically Part-time students will take two years to complete the programme. The maximum period of registration on the programme is three years for full time students and seven years for part-time students.

The diagram below identifies the modules available to you. All students take four single modules, plus the double module research project. Modules identified as prescribed must be taken by all students on BSc Psychology. BSc (Hons) Psychological Studies (top-up) part time   Students on the top-up programme will be offered a defined set of modules as shown below. •   Family Health Psychology (20 credits) •   Clinical Applications of Psychology (20 credits) •   Psychological Research Project (40 credits) •   Psychology in Education (20 credits) •   Addictive Behaviours (20 credits)

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Prescribed modules Prescribed modules cover significant areas of the curriculum, and must be taken by all students. However, failure to gain the credits from a prescribed module would not prevent you from graduating from BSc (Hons) Psychological Studies.

Assessment Regulations of Undergraduate Programmes   This programme operates within the Universities’ Regulatory Framework and conforms with its regulations on assessment. Please note you should be aware of the full academic “Rights, Responsibilities and Regulations” (3Rs) document which contains the academic regulations in full. These can be accessed at: http://www.derby.ac.uk/qed/3rs/ Now that you’ve enrolled for 2014/15 academic year, you’ll need to be aware of this year’s regulations. It is important that you understand what they are and what they might mean for you. For more detail take a look at www.derby.ac.uk/regs. Below are brief explanations of some of the assessment terms you need to be familiar with: Assessment of your psychology degree Each 20 credit module will require you to undertake a series of assessments. The type of assessment is individual to each module and clear information about each assessment can be found at the module pages for each module you are studying. Module mark The weightings of each component are applied to the marks achieved in each component of assessment when calculating the overall module mark. If a student passes a module, by achieving an average mark of at least 40%, the credit is awarded. To pass a module the average of the marks for the assessment components must be at least 40% and at least a mark of 35% must be achieved in each assessment component. Where this has not been achieved, credits are not awarded and the referral regulations apply. It is not possible to retake a module that has been passed, unless there is allowance made by an external body associated with the programme, explicitly stated in the programme specification To see how your work will be graded please view the undergraduate marking scale in the university assessment regulations. Summary of Assessment deadlines Each module consists of a Module Handbook and assignment details. Therefore staff should not be expected to supply information which have already made available. Failing modules A module is failed if: 6    

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The work submitted is not of a high enough standard to warrant an overall mark of at least 40% for the module. Work has not been submitted for the module assessments. If a student fails to submit an assignment a mark of NS will be recorded. The student has committed academic offences and a penalty of failing the module has been imposed.

If a student fails a module, the appropriate option from the following will apply: Referral in an assessment component A Referral is when a student does not pass an assessment component at the first attempt they may be offered the opportunity to submit further work to achieve a pass standard. If the referral work is of a pass standard, the work will be marked at 40%. Deferral A deferral is an approved extension to a deadline of an assessment. A deferred assessment will not have the grade capped at 40%. A deferral can occur in respect of illness, or other valid cause, is given only if you have submitted a formal written claim (EEC) and has provided acceptable evidence according to the regulations. If the EEC panel decides to uphold a claim one of the remedies is to offer the opportunity for the student to resubmit the work by a revised deadline. This is a deferral. Deadlines for resubmission of work will usually be within the same academic year. In the case of examinations the student will normally be directed to take the assessment at the next available exam period. The full range of marks will be available provided the work is submitted in line with the approved deadline. If, following deferral, the assessment is not submitted by the stipulated date, the assessment is considered failed and the referral regulations apply.

Exceptional Extenuating Circumstances, AED & late submissions Assessed Extended Deadline (AED)/ support plans Students with disabilities or long term health issues are entitled to a Support Plan and if you feel you have a disability which affects your academic performance it is your responsibility to contact Student Advisory Service and discuss whether a support plan is appropriate. Please see Assessed Extended Deadline (AED) for more detail.

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Exceptional Extenuating Circumstances (EEC) The Exceptional Extenuating Circumstance (EEC) policy applies to situations where serious, unforeseen circumstances prevent the student from completing the assignment on time or to the normal standard. Please see Exceptional Extenuating Circumstances (EEC) for more detail. All EEC claims will be considered by College/UDC panels, which will convene on a monthly basis. In clear-cut cases, where a quick response is required, decisions may be made through Chair’s action. Late Submission Late Submission covers unexpected and severe disruption to study, where circumstances do not require the additional time allowed for by an EEC. Late submission is intended to address circumstances of a similar severity to those covered by an EEC, but a student can request a late submission for their current assessment. A Request for late submission should be made to the relevant Discipline Head in the College (or Head of Joint Honours for joint honours students) who can authorise an extension of up to a maximum of one week. The Subject Manager will expect to see compelling evidence that such an extension is appropriate. Please see Late Submission for more detail.

Retaking modules If you have failed a module (mark below 40%) at the first attempt, including any referral opportunity, there is normally an entitlement to re-enrol for, and retake, the module in full once more. Retaking necessitates attendance and requires completion of all the assessments. Any assessment marks from the previous attempt at the module cannot be carried forward. If you have failed the module, including the referral opportunity on the second attempt there is no automatic entitlement to a further attempt. The offer of a third attempt is at the discretion of the Assessment Board, and will only be made if there are compelling reasons to support that decision. Students may only attempt a module in its entirety a maximum of three times, subject to additional requirements of relevant professional bodies, external agencies or UABEC. The maximum overall mark available for a retaken module is 40%.

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Classification of Award Degree classification Where students enter direct to the final stage of a programme, the mark average for the final level will serve as the overall performance indicator. For more details please see section F14.1 and F14.2 in Rights, Responsibilities and Regulations.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES TO ASSESSMENT Understanding what is expected It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that he understands the assessment criteria and learning outcomes against which their work will be marked. Continual engagement with the delivery of the module is important to enable a student to gain this understanding, and to fulfil their responsibility to the learning experience of fellow students. Academic offences Students must understand what constitutes an academic offence, including plagiarism, collusion, breach of examination room regulations, and ensure that they do not commit such offences in their studies and assessments. Policy for Late Entry to Classes by Students While anyone may occasionally suffer some problem that results in them being late for a class, it is clear that some students are persistent offenders in this respect. This behaviour is perceived by both students and staff as most disruptive, discourteous and not to be condoned.

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STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICE Singapore Student Support Centre Name

Email

Aventis Student Service

[email protected]

Executive: Jiahui

Communication and being Green We are committed to reducing its carbon footprint and unnecessary printing. Therefore, all communications you receive from us will be by email or online. You will have access to University of Derby platform for information about your course and modules and get your module results. You can access them both on and off campus. Email We will email you with any important information about your timetable and module. It is your responsibility to make sure you read what we send you and make sure your mailbox does not get full (you will not be able to send/receive mail if it is full). Academic Staff It is always a good idea to raise any module based questions with the teaching staff during class time. Academic staff also have office hours when you can arrange to meet them. It is normally best to email academics for appointments. What If Things Go Wrong? Personal problems: If you have personal problems or concerns you should speak to your course administrator. Module specific academic problems: If you are having problems with an individual module, you should first approach the module leader or lecturer. If your concern cannot be resolved, then you should approach your Student Service Officer.

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General academic queries: If you have general queries about your course or the regulations, you should speak to your course tutor or Student Service Officer. Administrative problems: If you experience problems of an administrative nature (e.g. timetable clashes, illness, etc), you should inform your Student Service Officer. Withdrawal/interruption: If you wish to withdraw from the university or temporarily suspend your studies, you must notify your Student Service Officer in writing as soon as possible. Interruption, without formally notifying us, may result in the year being considered as an attempt at the modules. If you have any problems that are affecting your ability to study, please seek help or advise early – the earlier we know about any problems the better chance we have to help you.

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