Curriculum Booklet Year 2

Curriculum Booklet Year 2 Term 1 . Welcome to the Year 2 T1 Curriculum Booklet In this document you should be able to find all the information you nee...

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Curriculum Booklet Year 2 Term 1

Welcome to the Year 2 T1 Curriculum Booklet In this document you should be able to find all the information you need that is relevant to the academic and curriculum provision offered at the school.

Our Purpose Our purpose is to promote the love of learning that prepares students for their next steps in education. In the ​ Infants​ (Y1 & Y2) our aim is to help the students grow in confidence and ability as they become independent learners.

Our Curriculum We deliver a broad and balanced British-based curriculum that is tailored using the International Primary Curriculum (IPC) to meet the needs of our diverse community. The British National Curriculum is used to design our schemes of work for the teaching of Literacy, Mathematics and Science. The IPC is an internationally recognised, comprehensive, child centred and future oriented curriculum programme. It is aimed at primary aged children (4-12) growing up in the 21st Century. It focuses on and nurtures a love of learning and encourages the necessary key skills and personal qualities to be a successful learner.

Assessment Assessment of children can take different forms including both observations and discussions as well as the formal assessment of written work and tests. The aims of assessment in our school are: ● to enable our children to demonstrate what they know, understand and can do in their work; ● to allow teaching teams to plan work that accurately reflects the needs of each child; ● to help our children understand what they need to do next to improve their work; ● to provide regular information for parents that enables them to support their child’s learning; ● to contribute towards accountability data.

Reporting Reporting of your child’s achievements and attainment is an ongoing process throughout their time at the school. At the beginning of the year you will recieve an intial settling in report that will highlight strengths and areas that need to be strengthened (Targets). Later in the year, you will recieve an update on your child’s progress and in particular find out how well they are working on their targets. Near the end of the school year, you will recieve the results of the school’s attainment assessments and a summary review of your child’s targets for the year.

Home Learning Home Learning should be concerned with consolidating concepts and involve work that has been introduced and covered in the classroom. It is aimed at the student’s level of ability in order for them to succeed and gain a sense of achievement. It is recommend that your child should spend no less than 15 minutes reading each evening. Each class has a reading Library for the children to select books of their own choice as well as Library books to take home for reading practice. Assignments over the course of the week should include: ● ● ● ●

Handwriting / spelling task ? Topic / Science related ? Maths or Language exercise ? Learning / practising / collecting / finding out ?

Home School Collaboration An important part of educating a child is the collaboration between the parents and the teacher. We recognise the value of your "expertise" when talking about your child. Your expertise lies in the anecdotal and experiential knowledge of your child. While this knowledge is different to that of a teacher, it is not less valuable. We can only find out what makes a child who they are by listening to you and this is what makes you such powerful advocates.

We want to collaborate with you because;● Strong links between home and school provide good opportunities for us to understand your child’s attitudes to learning, their rate of progress and level of attainment. ● Involving you in your child’s education helps to remove many misunderstandings and ambiguities about daily life in school. ● An effective and communicative collaboration between teachers and you establishes an environment where your child has a sense of security, familiarity and cultural freedom which, in turn, enhances learning

Subject Loading SUBJECT

HOURS

SUBJECT

HOURS

LITERACY

5

Music +

1

LIBRARY

1

PE +

1+1

MATHS

5

ICT

1

SCIENCE

2

PSHE

1

IPC

3

LANGUAGES

1+1

ASSEMBLY

1

TOTAL

24

Structure of the Day 07.15

Student Drop Off

08.00

School Starts

08.15

Lessons

10.15

BREAK

10.45

Lessons

12.45

LUNCH

13.45

Lessons

14.45

School Ends

15.00

Activities Start

16.00

Activities End

Please note: ● Nursery children finish at 12:45pm everyday. ● All students finish at 12:45pm on Wednesday, unless involved in the ASA programme.

The Curriculum Literacy Literacy is taught by the class teacher for 5 hours each week. In addition to the formally taught time, children will spend time in the library and take part in guided reading activities. Children are encouraged to do some form of individual reading on a daily basis. Throughout all year groups children will be taught to write in different styles, develop their speaking and listening skills and to infer various read texts. Much of the work in the lessons will be centred around texts that are chosen for their appeal to the age group. Literacy is cross-curricular and therefore all other subjects will be used to develop the children’s skills in Literacy. Non-Fiction, Instruction ● Speak with clarity and use appropriate intonation when reading and reciting texts . ● Listen to others in class, ask relevant questions and follow instructions. ● Ensure that everyone contributes, allocate tasks, and consider alternatives and reach agreement ● Draw together ideas and information from across a whole text, using simple signposts in the text ● Explain organisational features of texts, including alphabetical order, layout, diagrams, captions, hyperlinks and bullet points ● Engage with books through exploring and enacting interpretations ● Use question marks, and use commas to separate items in a list. ● Draw on knowledge and experience of texts in deciding and planning what and how to write ● Maintain consistency in non–narrative, including purpose and tense ● Select from different presentational features to suit particular writing purposes on paper and on screen ● Use appropriate language to make sections hang together Narrative, Traditional Stories ● Tell real and imagined stories using the conventions of familiar story language ● Respond to presentations by describing characters, repeating some highlights and commenting constructively ● Present part of traditional stories, their own stories or work from different parts of the curriculum for members of their own class ● Draw together ideas and information from across a whole text, using simple signposts in the text ● Give some reasons why things happen and or characters change ● Draw on knowledge and experience of texts in deciding and planning what and how to

write ● Select from different presentational features to suit particular writing purposes on paper and on screen ● Use planning to establish clear sections for writing ● Write simple and compound sentences and begin to use subordination in relation to time and reason Narrative, Stories with familiar settings ● Identify the characters. Use role-play to retell the story from one character's point of view and explore different courses of action. ● Read and tell a selection of stories with settings and themes that are familiar to the children, for example home, school, shops, holidays, getting lost, making friends, being ill. Children retell stories in pairs focusing on the sequence of events. ● Children select a character and describe what they do in the story, orally and in writing. ● Review the stories. Discuss the way that one event leads to another and identify temporal connectives. ● Represent the story structure in note form. Non-fiction, Information Texts ● Explain ideas and processes using imaginative and adventurous vocabulary and non-verbal gestures to support communication ● Listen to others in class, ask relevant questions and follow instructions ● Listen to talk by an adult, remember some specific points and identify what they have learned ● Listen to each other’s views and preferences, agree the next steps to take and identify contributions by each group member ● Adopt appropriate roles in small or large groups and consider alternative courses of action ● Pose questions and record these in writing, prior to reading. ● Investigate non-fiction books/ICT texts on similar themes to show that they can give different information and present similar information in different ways. ● Use contents pages/menus and alphabetically ordered texts, for example dictionaries, encyclopedias, indexes, directories, registers. ● Locate definitions/explanations in dictionaries and glossaries. ● Scan texts to find specific sections, for example key words or phrases, subheadings, and skim-read title, contents page, illustrations, chapter headings and subheadings to speculate what a text might be about and evaluate its usefulness for the research in hand. ● Close read text to gain information, finding the meaning of unknown words by deducing from text, asking someone, or referring to a dictionary or encyclopaedia. ● Make simple notes from nonfiction texts, for example key words and phrases, page/web references, headings, to use in subsequent writing.

● Write simple information texts incorporating labelled pictures and diagrams, charts, lists as appropriate. Design a simple website. ● Draw on knowledge and experience of texts in deciding and planning what and how to write. ● Maintain consistency in non-narrative, including purpose and tense. ● Create an alphabetically ordered dictionary or glossary of special interest words. ● Compose sentences using tense - consistently (present and past). ● Use question marks and use commas to separate items in a list. Poetry, Patterns on a page ● Speak with clarity and use appropriate intonation when reading and reciting texts ● Respond to presentations by describing characters, repeating some highlight and commenting constructively. ● Ensure that everyone contributes, allocate tasks, and consider alternatives and reach agreement. ● Work effectively in groups by ensuring that each group member takes a turn challenging, supporting and moving on. ● Consider how mood and atmosphere are created in live or recorded performance. ● Explore how particular words are used, including words and expressions with similar meanings. ● Listen to each other's views and preferences, agree the next steps to take and identify contributions by each group member. ● Consider how mood and atmosphere are created in live or recorded performance. ● Draw on knowledge and experience of texts in deciding and planning what and how to write. ● Make adventurous word and language choices appropriate to the style and purpose of the text. ● Select from different presentational features to suit particular writing purposes on paper and on screen.

Numeracy Maths throughout infants is taught in classes and differentiated within the class. Through consistent assessment and review the differentiated groups the children are placed in are constantly reviewed and there is plenty of opportunity for movement between groups. At SCIPs we are currently using the Primary Framework for Mathematics which is made up of seven strands, set out, within each strand, are clear learning objectives. The strands are as follows: 1. Using and applying Mathematics – Solve problems and discuss methods, identify and record information, enquiry, describe patterns and relationships.

2. Counting and understanding number- read and write 2 and 3 digit numbers, count up to 100, estimate, order numbers and fractions. 3. Knowing and using number facts- know number facts of 10, 20 and 100, know half is the inverse of doubles, multiplication facts 2, 5 and 10 and division facts for 2, 5 and 10. 4. Calculating- mental addition and subtraction, know addition is the inverse of subtraction and how to represent multiplication and division. 5. Understanding shape- identify 2D and 3D shapes, symmetry, positioning vocabulary and turns. 6. Measuring- estimate, compare and measure length, weight and capacity using standard units, read divisions on a scale and tell the time. 7. Handling data- Answer questions by collecting and recording data in lists, tables and diagrams. The 7 strands are organised into blocks of work which are revisited throughout the year. The topics covered within each block in Year 2 this term are as follows:

Science Health In this unit we’ll be finding out: ● About eating the right foods ● About getting enough exercise ● Why our bodies need sleep ● What happens when we are ill ● How germs get inside our bodies ● How to protect our bodies ● About our senses Materials In this unit we’ll be finding out: ● How to sort toys based on what they are made out of ● Which materials can be bent, squashed, twisted or stretched ● What materials are best for making a bath toy ● About pushes and pulls, and how things move

International Primary Curriculum (IPC) The humanities subjects are taught through topic related units using the IPC (International Primary Curriculum). The IPC is a comprehensive curriculum with a clear process of learning and with specific learning goals for every subject, for personal learning and for international mindedness.

We will be covering the following topics: BRAINWAVES Every day we are learning lots of new and different things – gaining the knowledge, skills and understanding that we will need to become successful adults. By finding out more about how we learn, and how we can improve our learning, we will be better equipped for meeting the many challenges ahead of us. We’ll be finding out: ● ● ● ●

About different methods of teaching and how we like to learn About some different areas of the brain and how information gets into the brain To apply strategies to improve their learning Know that we can affect the quality of our learning

HOW ARE YOU? We are very lucky in this class because we are all healthy. What things make us healthy? We are going to find out because we want to do everything we can to stay healthy. In ​ History​ , we’ll be finding out: ● About the doctors who discovered medicines ● About diseases from the past In ​ International​ , we’ll be finding out: ● Why some people don’t have drinking water ● What hospitals are like THE MAGIC TOYMAKER Toys come in many shapes and sizes. But all are designed for us to have fun with, to learn new skills and to exercise our bodies and our imagination. In ​ History​ , we’ll be finding out: ● About toys and games from the past ● How to decide if a toy is new or old ● How to create our own toy museum ● How we can learn about the past in different ways In ​ Technology​ , we’ll be finding out: ● About ‘magic’ toys that fool our eyes ● How to design and make our own board game ● How to design and make our own puppets In ​ ICT​ , we’ll be finding out:

● How to make our own space-themed computer game In ​ International​ , we’ll be finding out: ● About a popular game from another country and teaching others to play it

Computing ● ● ● ● ● ●

Print from a paint package Select copy and paste Use “ Word doc.” to learn applications in a word document Programme a toy with extended instructions Use search engine How to make our own space-themed computer game

Physical Education ● Motor Skills Assessment ● Basic Motor Coordination Skills ● Introduction to Gymnastics

Music ● ● ● ●

Exploring sounds Exploring duration Dance and rhythm Learning new songs linked to IPC Curriculum and PSHE

Languages Bahasa Malaysia ​ lessons will focus on

German​ lessons will focus on

Mandarin​ lessons will focus on

Objects in school Celebrations Fruits Vehicles and Transportation Deepavali Christmas

Greetings Emotions Fruits Colours Body parts Autumn (forest, animals) Bakery in Germany Numbers Food

Basic Greetings Numbers (1-20) Colours Mid-Autumn Festival Introducing Myself My Family My Face and Body Parts In the School Food and Drinks

Winter Celebrations German games

Fruits and Vegetables In the market My Hobby Clothing Time (Days and Months) In the Farm In the Zoo Emotions