EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Master Plan

3.0 ASSESSMENT OF EXISTING ... Rainfall Model Units ... Water demand in the Bicol River Basin is generally categorized according to its major uses...

0 downloads 23 Views 2MB Size
      Volume 1   

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY    Integrated Bicol River Basin  Management and Development   Master Plan    July 2015                                With Technical Assistance from:   

Orient Integrated Development Consultants, Inc. 

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

   

Table of Contents      1.0  INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................ 1 

2.0  KEY FEATURES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE BICOL RIVER BASIN ........................... 1  3.0  ASSESSMENT OF EXISTING SITUATION ........................................................................ 3  4.0  DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES ................................................... 9  5.0  VISION, GOAL, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES ........................................................... 10  6.0  INVESTMENT REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................... 17  7.0  ECONOMIC ANALYSIS ................................................................................................. 20  8.0  ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF PROPOSED PROJECTS ....................................... 20     

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

i

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

 

1.0

INTRODUCTION 

  The Bicol River Basin (BRB) has a total land area of 317,103 hectares and covers the provinces  of  Albay,  Camarines  Sur  and  Camarines  Norte.  The  basin  plays  a  significant  role  in  the  development  of  the  region  because  of  the  abundant  resources  within  it  and  the  ecological  services it provides to support the livelihood of communities.  About 77% of the basin area or  243,800 hectares are cultivated agricultural lands. Its rivers and lakes provide irrigation water  to  these  agricultural  lands,  apart  from  being  used  for  fishing.    The  forests  and  forestlands,  including  protected  areas,  contain  rich  biodiversity  resources  and  non‐timber  products,  which are used as raw materials for handicrafts. These forestlands are the head waters of the  major rivers and tributaries of the BRB, which are sources of water for irrigation, domestic  use and power generation.      The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) identified the BRB as one of  the  18  priority  river  basins  in  the  country  for  which  comprehensive  management  and  development  master  plans  are  to  be  formulated  following  the  integrated  watershed  resources  management  (IWRM)  approach.  This  planning  framework  ensures  that  the  situation in the basin is viewed in a holistic manner and that the interconnections between  upstream and downstream activities are taken into account.  IWRM provides the context for  harmonizing individual and collective resource management actions of various stakeholders  and for improving the overall governance system for the river basin.     

2.0

KEY FEATURES AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE BICOL RIVER BASIN  

  The Bicol River Basin (BRB) is drained by two major rivers.  These are the Bicol River and the  Libmanan  River,  which  meet  near  Aslong,  Libmanan  before  they  finally  empty  into  the  San  Miguel Bay.  Based on the topographically delineated watershed divide, 43 local government  units (LGUs) are situated wholly or partially within the Bicol River Basin.    Sub‐Basins within the Bicol River Basin For  management  purposes,  the  entire  BRB  was  divided  by  the  Department  of  Area  Sub‐Basin  % Share  (hectares)  Environment  and  Natural  Resources  Libmanan‐Pulantuna 74,416  23% (DENR) into eight sub‐basins.    Naga‐Yabo 8,840  3%   Naporog 10,812  3% Close to 81% of the areas within the BRB  Pawili  39,441  12% are  relatively  flat;  only  3,297  hectares  of  Quinali 59,550  19% the  BRB  are  situated  in  elevations  above  Ragay Hills 52,393  17% 1,000 meters above sea level. The highest  Thiris 27,687  9% altitude is the peak of Mt. Mayon, which  Waras‐Lalo 43,964  14% is about 2,500 meters above sea level.      TOTAL 317,103  100%   The Bicol River Basin falls under three climate types: (a) no dry season with very pronounced  rainfall from November to January (for the upper portion of the BRB); (b) rainfall more or less  evenly  distributed  throughout  the  year  (for  the  central  strip);  and  (c)  season  not  very  pronounced dry from November to April and wet during the rest of the year (for the lower  portion).    The  river  basin  also  lies  within  the  main  typhoon  belt  of  the  Philippines  and  as  such, experiences frequent tropical storms and typhoons.    

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

1

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  Geomorphologic Map of the Bicol River Basin 

 

Source: Nippon Koei Inc., 2003 

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

2

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  The BRB’s geomorphology is controlled by the distribution of the major geologic formations,  which  allows  it  to  be  naturally  divided  into  the  Volcanic  Terrain,  the  Bicol  Plain  and  the  Sedimentary  Terrain.   The eastern rim  is  bounded  by  a  line  of  volcanoes of  which  one,  the  Mayon Volcano is active.    Geological and Meteorological Hazards    The  hazards  that  can  potentially  affect  the  Bicol  River  Basin  fall  under  the  following  categories:  hydrologic,  volcanic,  earthquake‐induced,  coastal‐related,  mass  movement,  and  typhoons.      Flooding is the most pervasive hydrologic hazard that threatens the entire Bicol Plain.  This  hazard is attributed to the combined effect of the regular passage of typhoons, high runoff in  the surrounding Volcanic and Sedimentary Terrains and the natural low elevation of the Bicol  Plain.  The projected flooded area in the BRB for a one‐in‐five‐year return period is estimated  to cover 42,124 hectares.  This is expected to increase to 50,402 hectares or 16% of the BRB  area in a one‐in‐25‐year return period of flooding, affecting significant areas of settlements  and agricultural lands, particularly irrigated rice lands.     The  volcanic  hazards  include  ash  fall,  pyroclastic  and  lava  flows,  earthquakes  and  lahar  or  mud  flows.  These  hazards  are  generally  limited  around  the  vicinity  of  the  active  Mayon  Volcano.  Earthquake‐induced hazards include ground rupture, ground shaking, tsunamis and  liquefaction.    Coastal  hazards  comprise  of  tsunamis,  storm  surges  and  erosion.    The  areas  susceptible to mass movements or landslides correspond to the upper slopes of the volcanic  centers and the edges of the sedimentary terrain; about 51,750 hectares (16% of BRB area)  are  susceptible  to  landslide  within  the  BRB.    An  average  of  20  tropical  cyclones  also  pass  through  the  Philippine  Area  of  Responsibility  (PAR)  every  year.  BRB  has  a  21‐30%  typhoon  occurrence.      

3.0

ASSESSMENT OF EXISTING SITUATION 

  Ecosystems, Resources and Uses    The existing ecosystems and resources in the BRB as identified from ridge to reef comprise of  the following: (1) land resources consisting of forests and forestlands, protected areas (PA),   cultivated  agricultural  lands  and  settlements  and  built‐  up  areas;  (2)  surface  and  ground  water  resources  including  rivers  and  lakes;  and  (3)  mangroves,  marshlands,  wetlands  and  coastal resources.    Land Resources     About  83%  (262,246  hectares)  of  the  total  land  area  of  BRB  are  classified  as  alienable  and  disposable (A and D) while 12% or 38,232 hectares are forestlands and 4% (12,120 hectares)  are  protected  areas.    The  A  and  D  lands  are  generally  titled,  privately‐owned  and  used  for  agriculture,  settlements  and  for  other  commercial  and  industrial  purposes.    Most  of  the  cultivated agricultural lands are located in Libmanan‐ Pulantuna, Quinali and Ragay Hills sub‐ basins.    Key  economic  crops  where  the  basin  has  comparative  advantage  in  terms  of  agro‐ ecological  conditions  include  rice,  coconut,  coffee,  cacao,  pili  nut,  and  citrus.  In  addition, 

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

3

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  there  are  a  number  of  valuable  non‐timber  forest  products,  notably  abaca,  with  the  Bicol  Region being one of the main sources for this fiber.    The forestlands and protected areas, which cover the higher slopes of Mt. Labo, Mt. Isarog,  Mt. Malinao, Mt. Masaraga, Mt. Iriga, Mt. Mayon, Ragay Hills and Bicol National Park contain  the remaining 10,175 hectares of closed forests and the 18,310 hectares of open forests in  the  river  basin,  including  their  associated  biodiversity  resources.    The  vegetation  types  generally consist of grasslands, lowland dipterocarp forests, and montane forests with small  patches of mossy forests in higher elevations.      A comparison of the 2003 and 2010 land cover map of the BRB indicates that closed canopy  forests has increased by 83% from 5,576 hectares to 10,175 hectares.  However, in the same  period, about 5,636 hectares of open canopy forests were also lost, indicating that some of  the  open  forests  in  2003  have  developed  into  closed  canopy  forests  with  about  1,037  hectares lost to other lower quality vegetation.    Land Cover within the Bicol River Basin, 2010 About  35%  of  the  forestlands  covering  Land Cover (2010)  Grand Total  % of BRB  13,527  hectares  are  already  CADT  and  Annual Crop  123,860  39%  tenured  lands.    CADT  lands  are  6,491  Built‐up  8,721  3%  hectares  while  7,036  hectares  are  Closed Forest  10,178  3%  community‐based  forest  management  Fishpond  149  0.05%  Grassland  6,881  2%  agreements.  At least four protected areas  Inland Water  7,282  2%  are located in the BRB: Bicol National Park,  Mangrove Forest  2,106  1%  Mt.  Isarog  Natural  Park,  Mayon  Volcano  Marshland/Swamp  378  0.1%  Natural Park, and Libmanan Caves Natural  Open Forest  18,304  6%  Park.  These  protected  areas  hold  Open/Barren  689  0%  Perennial Crop  119,939  38%  hundreds  of  terrestrial  species  of  wildlife  Shrubs  16,471  5%  and  serve  as  sanctuary  to  endangered  Wooded grassland  1,846  1%  species.  Outliers  299  0.1%    Total  317,103  100%  Source: 2010 Land Cover Map, NAMRIA 

Surface and Groundwater Resources    The  Bicol  River  Basin  is  drained  by  a  network  of  rivers  and  lakes  that  occupy  an  estimated  area of 7,309 hectares.  The lake ecosystem is an important resource of the river basin. The  three major lakes within the BRB are Lake Buhi, Lake Bato and Lake Baao.  Lake Bato is the  seventh  largest  lake  in  the  country.    The  Sinarapan  is  found  in  this  lake  as  well  as  other  economically important fish species like tilapia, carp, freshwater shrimp, catfish, and climbing  perch.      The highest annual rainfall observed within the BRB is in San Lorenzo Ruiz, Camarines Sur with  mean  annual  rainfall  of  6,610  mm  for  the  period  2000‐2012.  Annual  rainfall  for  Legazpi  City  (southeast of the basin) and Daet, Camarines Norte (north of the basin) are 3,822 and 3,957 mm,  respectively,  for  the  same  period.    The  average  rainfall  scenario  represents  most  of  the  flat  central areas (Lower and Middle BRB); the mean annual rainfall in these areas is 2,503 mm.        There is ground water recharge of up to 4.3% of rainfall in areas where there is average to  high  rainfall  or  when  the  average  rainfall  is  at  least  2,500  mm  per  year.  In  areas  with  low  rainfall,  ground  water  discharge  is  experienced  on  an  average  of  5.3%  of  rainfall/year.  The  water  balance  computations  also  indicate  that  about  50%  of  the  annual  rainfall  becomes 

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

4

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  surface runoff. Runoff drops significantly in low rainfall areas as the soil moisture storage is  rarely  saturated.    Combining  the  surface  runoff  and  ground  water  recharge,  the  estimated  available water in the BRB is about 9.22 million cubic meters (MCM) per day.  The recharge  areas  are  concentrated  in  the  upper  section  of  the  Libmanan‐Pulantuna  sub‐basin  in  the  vicinity  of  Mt.  Labo  and  the  Bicol  National  Park.  Under  a  climate  change  scenario,  the  available  water  in  the  BRB  will  slightly  increase  to  11.31  MCM  per  day.  With  a  projected  water demand of 11.387 MCM per day in 2030, there will be a water deficit of about 0.068  MCM per day in 2030.    Summary of Annual Water Balance in the Bicol River Basin  Rainfall Model  High    Average    Moderate    Low   

Units  mm  % of P  mm  % of P  mm  % of P  mm  % of P 

Mean  Precipitation  3,957 2,511 3,175 1,921

Mean Surface  Run Off  2,409 61% 1,217 48% 1,712 54% 778 40%

Actual Evapo‐ transpiration  1,378  35%  1,293  51%  1,387  44%  1,245  65% 

Ground Water  Recharge  169 4.30% 1 1% 76 2.40% ‐102 ‐5.30%

  Water demand in the Bicol River Basin is generally categorized according to its major uses: (a)  municipal  for  domestic,  commercial  and  industrial  uses,  and  (b)  agricultural  for  irrigation,  fishery, poultry and livestock uses.  Irrigation uses will dominate the water requirements in  the  BRB  by  2030,  amounting  to  94%  of  the  total  water  demand.    The  domestic  water  requirements will only comprise 2.2% of the total.  The projections are based on a 2002 study  under  the  World  Bank  financed  by  the  River  Basin  and  Watershed  Management  Program,  with further adjustments to current data and water requirements.    According  to  the  water  quality  study  commissioned  by  the  DENR  Environmental  Management Bureau in 2010, the common sources of pollution in the water are rural runoff,  urban runoff, domestic sources, market sources, and industrial and commercial sources.  The  Libmanan,  Pulantuna  and  Bicol  rivers  are  classified  as  Class  A  waters.    The  Naga  River  is  designated  as  a  Water  Quality  Management  Area  (WQMA)  and  classified  as  Class  C.    The  Pawili and Quinale rivers are also Class C; the Waras River is unclassified.  Lake Buhi is also  designated  as  a  WQMA  and  classified  as  Class  B.    The  Libmanan  River  has  the  lowest  estimated  pollution  load  at  967.5  MT  BOD/year.    The  Naga  and  Quinali  Rivers  have  the  highest pollution load at 7,696.8 MT BOD/yr and 10,116 MT BOD/yr, respectively.    It is recommended that monitoring of groundwater for fertilizer and pesticide contaminants  be put in place to better assess the quality of water supply, the large section of the BRB that  is devoted to rice farming being the potential source of these contaminants.    Coastal Resources     The coastal resources of the Bicol River Basin are located in San Miguel Bay (SMB) where the  Bicol River and the Libmanan River drain.  The study by Sumalde and Pedroso in 2001 cited  that San Miguel Bay has three significant coastal habitats: coral reefs, mangroves and soft‐ bottom communities. 

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

5

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

   

Mangroves  and  marshlands/wetlands  within  the  BRB  are  estimated  to  cover  about  2,488  hectares.  These are generally located within the Libmanan‐Pulantuna, Thiris, and Naga‐Yabo  sub‐basin,  including  a  small  patch  within  Ragay  Hills  adjacent  to  Lake  Bato.    The  DENR  has  declared 27 hectares in Cabusao at the mouth of the Bicol River as Cabusao Wetlands.     

The San Miguel Bay is economically important since it is a major source of livelihood for the  coastal communities. It is estimated that around 9,572 fishers from the coastal municipalities  are engaged in fishing in the bay as their primary source of income.     Socio‐Economic Condition    The Bicol region, where the Bicol River Basin is located, serves as the gateway of Luzon to the  Visayas  and  Mindanao.    It  is  accessible  by  land  from  Manila  and  the  rest  of  Luzon  and  by  water from Visayas and Mindanao.  It is also accessible by air transport via the Legaspi airport  in  Albay  and  Pili  airport  in  Camarines  Sur.  Aggregate  population  in  the  BRB  municipalities/cities was placed at around two million in 2010.     

Overall  population  density  in  the  BRB  is  estimated  at  around  seven  persons  per  hectare,  signifying that the BRB is still relatively sparsely populated. Among the sub‐basins, Naga‐Yabo  has  the  highest  population  density  at  23  persons  per  hectare.    Indigenous  peoples  (IP)  comprising  of  the  Agtas  and  their  sub‐tribes  inhabit  most  sub‐basins.  They  are  most  prominent  though  in  the  Waras‐Lalo,  Pawili,  Naporog,  Ragay  Hills  and  Thiris  sub‐basins  where CADCs and CADTs have been delineated and/or awarded to them.   

Poverty  is  pervasive  all  throughout  the  BRB.  Incidence  of  poverty  among  families  averaged  nearly  40%  in  2009,  ranging  from  a  low  of  24%  to  as  high  as  53%.  This  is  almost  twice  the  national poverty incidence rate (at 23%) for the same period.  Poverty is most pronounced in  the Ragay Hills and Libmanan‐Pulantuna sub‐basins.     Summary of the Demographic Features of Bicol River Basin by Sub‐Basin  Sub‐Basin 

Area  % to  within  Total BRB Sub‐Basin 

Popn*  (2010) 

% to  Total BRB  Pop’n 

Pop’n  (2000) 

Pop’n  Growth  Rate (%) 

Pop’n  Density 

Poverty  Incidence (2009)** 

Libmanan‐ 74,416  23 398,765 19.8 351,860  1.26%  5.36  44.7 Pulantuna  Naga‐Yabo  8,840  3 203,405 10.1 160,445  2.40%  22.97  30.5 Naporog  10,812  3 42,770 2.1 36,231  1.67%  3.96  40.2 Pawili  39,441  12 82,307 4.1 67,393  2.02%  2.09  33.1 Quinali  59,550  19 511,391 25.4 461,281  1.04%  8.59  40.1 Ragay Hills  52,393  17 154,958 7.7 129,293  1.83%  2.96  45.6 Thiris  27,687  9 234,909 11.7 203,730  1.43%  8.48  40.1 Waras‐Lalo  43,964  14 382,821 19.0 331,731  1.44%  8.71  35.6 TOTAL  317,103  100 2,011,326 100.0 1,741,964  1.45%  6.34  38.7 * Since municipalities/cities straddle several sub‐basins, LGU population is applied only once in areas where a large  proportion of the LGU is located relative to the sub‐basin (Corrected from the Stakeholders Analysis Report based  on new data).  **Poverty incidence by municipality  Source: Area based on GIS estimates; Population from PSA; Poverty Incidence from NSCB     

 

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

6

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  Agriculture and fishing are the main economic activities in the BRB.  The main farm product is  rice followed by corn, coconuts, abaca, and root crops. Parts of the BRB are sources of the  pineapple “Formosa” (also called the Queen Pineapple), which the Bicol Region is known for.   The town of Mercedes in Camarines Norte is a major fishing center that exports fish, crabs  and  shrimp  to  Manila.    Livestock  production  is  primarily  on  small‐scale  basis  and  mostly  backyard  farming.  However,  Baao  in  Camarines  Sur  is  noted  for  egg  production,  being  the  biggest  source  of  eggs  in  the  region.    Naga  City  is  the  region’s  center  of  commercialization  and industrialization.  Parts of the Bicol River Basin also serve as good sources of non‐metallic  minerals such as diatomaceous earth (white clay), sand, gravel and boulders.    Majority  of  the  municipalities  in  the  BRB  get  water  supply  services  from  LGU‐run  water  systems. Only 13 municipalities have water districts; on the average, they serve about 20% to  40% of households in their respective service areas.      Various irrigation infrastructure had been constructed in the BRB, mostly serving rice farms.   These  consist  of  either  the  pump  or  gravity  irrigation  systems  managed  by  the  national  government, the Irrigators’ Associations or by private individuals.  The total service area of  these  irrigation  structures  is  about  40,527  hectares.    The  other  existing  river  and  related  structures  are:  a)  road  bridges;  b)  irrigation  system  diversion  weirs  and  barrages;  c)  flood  diversion  spillways;  d)  flood  embankment  dikes;  e)  riverbanks  revetment  work;  f)  seawalls  and g) drainage outlet structures in the tidal zone.    The competitive goods and services common to the sub‐basins are rice, and coconut in the  cultivated  lands,  water  for  irrigation  and  domestic  use  in  forestlands  and  protected  areas  including biodiversity resources and existing forests, which can be enrolled under the REDD+  program (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation).  Aside from this,  the  Quinali,  Naga‐Yabo,  Pawili,  Waras‐Lalo,  and  Quinali  sub‐basins  have  comparative  advantages  in  terms  of  recreation  and  tourism  because  of  the  presence  Mt.  Isarog,  Mt.  Masaraga, Mt. Mayon and Lakes Buhi and Bato.       Vulnerabilities to Hazards    The ecosystems within the BRB and their associated biodiversity resources will be impacted  by  climate  changes.    Areas  in  higher  elevations,  particularly  in  the  upper  slopes  of  Mt.  Mayon,  Mt.  Isarog  and  Mt.  Labo,  will  be  most  vulnerable  to  temperature  change.    Data  indicates  that  the  sea‐level  rise,  combined  with  more  frequent  and  severe  storms  and  flooding affects low‐lying communities during storm surges. Based on the current projection  for  sea  level  rise  at  one  meter,  around  6,978  hectares  of  land,  including  farmlands,  will  be  inundated, located along the southern rim of San Miguel Bay covering the Bonbon, Cabusao,  Calabanga, Libmanan, Magarao, Sipocot and Tinambac.     The  BRB  is  also  considered  as  high‐risk  to  rainfall  pattern  changes.  Although  generally,  the  area has no pronounced wet and dry season, changes in rainfall pattern will have an impact  on  water  supply.  The  projections  made  for  the  region  indicate  that  rainfall  will  decrease  during  the  dry  season  by  11%  to  18%  for  2020  and  rising  through  40%  by  2050.  This  will  cause intense competition to water resources.  Aside from the deficit in the estimated supply  from precipitation, salt water intrusion due to rising sea levels will contaminate water supply.  Higher concentration of salts in irrigation waters will affect soil fertility.   

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

7

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  Locations of Irrigation Dams and Flood Control Structures in the Bicol River Basin 

 

   

Vol

 

1:

Executive

Summary

8

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  Stakeholders    The  identified  stakeholders  in  the  BRB  are  Farmers’  Groups  and  Irrigators’  Associations;  Fisher  folk  (lake,  river,  estuary  and  coastal/marine  fishers);  Agta  IP;,  Water  Districts  and  Waterworks groups; PA Supervisors, PA Management Boards (PAMB) and associated POs and  NGOs; CBFM/CSC/ISF holders; BRB LGUs; private enterprises; and NGAs operating in the BRB.    Current Institutional Arrangements    From  2010  to  present,  the  BRB  Watershed  Management  Plan  remains  the  basis  of  development and management initiatives in the BRB for most DENR and LGU‐driven projects,  promoting  and  implementing  the  IWRM/Integrated  Ecosystems  Management  (IEM)  approach.    The  BRB  Management  Committee  (BRB  MC)  was  established  as  a  permanent  special committee of the Regional Development Council in 2012.  A July 2012 DENR Region 5  Special  Order  created  the  BRB  Program  Coordinating  Office  (PCO)  to  provide  the  technical  and administrative support to the BRB MC and its Technical Working Group (TWG).  But the  BRB  PCO  may  need  a  more  interdisciplinary  staff  complement,  particularly  if  the  IEM  approach will be determinedly pursued in the BRB.     Locally‐based  resource  management  structures  have  also  been  established  in  the  BRB  in  compliance with policies providing for localized, site specific management of water and other  natural resources and as part of efforts to address local water‐related issues and concerns.   The Libmanan‐Pulantuna Watershed Management Council (LPWMC) was established in April  2008.    The  LPWMC  was  replicated  in  the  Quinali  sub‐basin,  which  is  also  a  pilot  site  for  National  Convergence  Initiative.  It  is  also  pilot  site  of  USAID’s  Biodiversity  and  Watersheds  Improved for Stronger Economy and Ecosystem Resilience (B+WISER) Program and the Bicol  Agri  Water Project  (BAWP).    It  is  still  early  to  tell  which  of the  two  management  models  is  more responsive and effective in addressing the issues and concerns in the sub‐basins.    Area‐ and program‐based management bodies also exist that have management jurisdiction  over specific portions of the BRB.  These are the PAMBs, WQMA Governing Boards, Fisheries  and  Aquatic  Resource  Management  Councils  (FARMC),  Multi‐Sectoral  Barangay  ENR  Management  Committees  in  the  Libmanan‐Pulantuna  watershed,  and  the  Metro  Naga  Development Council.     

4.0

DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES 

  The  various  resources  within  the  Bicol  River  Basin  have  great  potential  for  sustaining  and  enhancing the economic development of the LGUs found within.  Enhanced development of  its vast agricultural areas can support livelihood of a large segment of the population who are  traditionally dependent on farming as their primary source of income.  The lakes and rivers, if  properly  managed,  can  continue  to  provide  additional  livelihood  opportunities  to  communities living near these resources through fishing. These lakes and rivers can continue  to supply the irrigation water requirements of most of the rice production areas in the basin.      Unfortunately,  because  of  environmental  and  institutional  constraints/limitations,  opportunities  within  the  basin  are  not  effectively  harnessed.  The  typhoons  that  pass  the  region  annually  damage  developed  agricultural  lands,  infrastructure  and  properties.    Apart 

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

9

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  from climate‐related constraints, development within the BRB is constrained by other issues,  such as the following:     a)  Forest cover continues to decline;  b)  The production capacity of agricultural lands, particularly the irrigated rice lands, is  still constrained by deteriorated irrigation systems;  c)  Declining fish catch in the lakes and rivers;   d)  Saline water intrusion into the Bicol River; and  e)    From the institutional perspective, insufficient funding, inadequate logistical support  and trained manpower, and the fragmented interventions within the basin have  constrained efficient management of BRB.    Taken together, the situation has resulted in continuing poverty in rural areas, contributing  further to the degradation of the Bicol River Basin as local communities adopt more resource  extractive practices.      

5.0

VISION, GOAL, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES 

  Vision    Based  on  previous  studies,  the  assessment  of  the  biophysical  conditions,  the  stakeholders  and institutions working within the BRB, the agreed vision statement is as follow:    A  sustainably  managed  Bicol  River  Basin  with  high  ecosystem  biodiversity,  providing  stable,  dependable,  and  sustained  high  quality  water  supply  for  agricultural,  domestic  and  industrial  use  and  contributing  to  the  socio‐ economic development of local communities.    Goal    Reduce poverty in local communities such that those within the Bicol River Basin are able to  sustain  their  livelihoods  without  resorting  to  environmentally  destructive  practices  and  empower them to become co‐custodians of the river basin.    Purpose   

Sustain the increase in income of farmers and fishers.    Outputs   

1) Sustain and enhance agricultural productivity.  2) Increase  income  from  diversified  NTFP‐based  livelihood  opportunities  as  a  result  of  the recovery of forest biodiversity.  3) Increase  fish  catch  as  a  result  of  rehabilitated  marine  ecosystems  and  improved  water quality.  4) Secure  the  lives,  shelter  and  sources  of  livelihood  through  relocation  to  safe  communities. 

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

10

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

    The objectives within 10‐15 years to achieve the vision and goal of the BRB Master plan are  the following:   

1) 2) 3) 4) 5)

Increase productivity of major crops and commodities.  Increase of and protection of remaining forest cover.  Improved water quality of major rivers and lakes in the BRB.   Rehabilitated mangrove areas.  Reduced losses due to natural disasters and hazards.    Furthermore,  the  following  immediate  objectives  of  the  BRB  Master  plan  are  aimed  to  be  realized:   

1) Minimize  incidences  of  flooding  through  improved  storage  capacity  of  rivers  and  lakes  by  constructing  12  flood  control  structures,  by  2030,  in  strategic  locations  within the BRB;  2) Provide sufficient irrigation facilities through rehabilitation and upgrading of existing  facilities or construction of new systems for an additional 31,000 hectares of irrigable  land within the BRB;  3) Rehabilitate  at  least  18,000  hectares  of  degraded  forestlands  and  develop  at  least  100,000 hectares in A and D lands through multi‐storey agroforestry plantations;  4) Improved waste disposal by developing sanitary landfill facilities in seven cluster LGUs,  establishing  wastewater  facilities  in  government  offices  and  in  28  markets/abattoir  or  priority LGUs, and developing septage treatment facilities in 14 priority LGUs;  5) Resettle at least 6,000 families in high disaster risk areas, particularly those informally  settled in river easements;  6) Comprehensively  identify  vulnerabilities  and  corresponding  adaptation  actions  for  communities  within  the  BRB  by  completing  detailed  vulnerability  assessments  and  adaptation plans for 43 LGUs within the BRB by 2017.    Key Strategies    The general approach adopted in this master plan is to properly align land uses from ridge to  reef  so  that  activities  undertaken  in  one  ecosystem  do  not  adversely  affect  the  other  ecosystems.  Thus, zoning of the entire BRB was undertaken for this purpose as indicated in  the table below:    Management Zones in the BRB  Sub‐basins  Libmanan‐Pulantuna  Naga‐Yabo  Naporog  Pawili River  Quinali  Ragay Hills  Thiris  Waras‐Lalo  Grand Total 

Boundary  Outliers  122                122 

Hazard  Zones  6,388 973 25 3,037 16,883 11,084 13,068 8,043 59,501

Production  Zones  40,609 6,289 10,426 27,367 34,465 32,568 11,508 25,839 189,071

Protection  Zones  23,457 730 315 8,351 1,144 8,193 2,990 2,830 48,011

Settlement  Zones  3,841  847  45  686  7,059  548  121  7,252  20,399 

Grand  Total  74,416 8,840 10,812 39,441 59,550 52,393 27,687 43,964 317,103

 

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

11

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  The  identified  strategies  for  the  BRB  also  address  the  root  causes  of  the  problems  as  indicated  in  the  problem  tree  to  achieve  the  vision,  goals  and  objectives.  They  include  the  following:    Strategies to Promote Resilience of Ecosystems and Communities to Climate Related Hazards    The range of ecosystems services provided by the BRB is threatened by human induced activities  such as kaingin making, timber poaching, mangrove conversion, and over fishing, among others.  The  adverse  effects  of  these  unsustainable  resource  practices  will  be  aggravated  further  as  climate  change  intensifies.    Hence,  it  is  imperative  to  adopt  measures  and  strategies  that  will  strengthen resilience of ecosystems and communities to climate related hazards.    1) Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Planning  2) Protection of Existing Natural Forests   3) Rehabilitation of Degraded Forestlands and Protected Areas  4) Management of Mangroves, Wetlands and Coastal Resources  5) Improvement of Flood Control Structures  6) Management of River Easements, including resettlement planning and  implementation   

Strategies to Promote Investments in Production Areas to Meet Demands for Ecosystems  Goods and Services    The following are the comparative advantage of the Bicol River Basin:    1) It  has  vast  areas  of  plain  agricultural  lands  comprising  about  87%  of  its  total  area,  which can be developed to support the food requirement of its growing population.  The  irrigated  rice  lands alone  represents  58%  of  the  total  irrigated  rice  lands  in  the  province  of  Albay  and  Camarines  Sur,  supplying  significant  percentage  of  the  rice  requirements of these provinces.  2) Its  inland  water  bodies  (rivers  and  lakes)  and  coastal  resources  in  San  Miguel  Bay  contain rich fisheries resources providing livelihood to local populations.   3) It  has  water  resources  (surface  and  underground)  which  if  managed  properly,  can  continue to provide water to communities for domestic and agricultural purposes.   4) Its  existing  natural  forests  contain  non‐timber  resources  which  can  be  enhanced  further to support handicraft making in selected communities and provide additional  sources of livelihood.     

With  increasing  population,  demand  for  rice,  water,  and  fisheries  resources  will  correspondingly  increase.  Communities  will  also  require  more  livelihoods  to  support  the  basic needs of their families.  As such, it is necessary to enhance the productive assets of BRB  to  meet  the  increasing  demands  for  ecosystems  goods  and  services.  The  master  plan  has  identified strategies to encourage private sector investments so that increasing demands for  various goods and services can be met.    1) Upgrading of Irrigation Facilities  2) Management of Rivers, Lakes and Ground Water Resources to Ensure Water Quality   3) Development of Sustainable Livelihood  

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

12

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  Proposed Management Zones 

Settlement Zone  

   

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

13

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  Existing Road Systems within the Bicol River Basin Relative to Production Areas 

 

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

14

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  Strategies to Improve Local Governance of BRB    Governance of the Bicol River Basin has been complicated by the existence of a number of  organizations and inter‐agency environment and economic development councils and groups  at different levels with closely related or seemingly overlapping mandates.  With many on‐ site stakeholders and institutions operating in the BRB, collaborative management becomes  the  most  appropriate  governance  mechanism  at  the  basin  and  sub‐basin  level.  The  establishment  of  collaborative  management  structures  can  potentially  resolve  many  of  the  operational issues arising from overlaps in institutional mandates, and allow various agencies  and  institutions,  communities  and  stakeholders  to  work  together  and  clarify  roles  and  responsibilities in the management of the basin.     The  Bicol  River  Basin  Management  Committee  (BRB  MC)  under  the  RDC  will  remain  as  the  regional  and  basin‐level  coordinating  and  management  body  for  the  BRB  and  as  a  special  committee under the RDC 5.  A mandated function of the BRB MC is the formulation of a BRB  strategic management plan that incorporates climate change adaptation (CCA) and disaster  risk reduction management (DRRM).     In  relation  to  the  implementation  of  the  master  plan,  its  functions  will  be  expanded  and  made  more  specific  to  include  the  following  tasks:  a)  review  and  monitor  strategic  action  plans of national agencies and LGUs in BRB that support or can be integrated into the BRB  management  plan;  b)  promote  public  and  private  investments  to  identified  priority  interventions or areas in BRB; c) define the investments and uses of BRB resources that need  to  be  regulated  or  disallowed  in  BRB;  d)  facilitate  resolution  of  program  implementation  issues  and  resource‐related  conflicts  that  may  arise  among  LGUs  and  BRB  stakeholders;  e)  spearhead  advocacies  and  campaigns  that  will  promote  good  practices  in  resource  and  biodiversity  conservation,  DRRM,  solid  waste  management  and  pollution  control;  f)  formulate  and  implement  a  comprehensive  and  gender  sensitive  technical  assistance  and  capacity  development  program  for  LGUs  and  other  stakeholders;  g)  set  up  a  database  for  BRB;  and  h)  set  up  a  results‐based  monitoring  and  evaluation  system  for  BRB,  with  clear  performance indicators, reporting flows and feedback mechanism.     The  BRB  Program  Coordinating  Office  (PCO)  will  continue  to  provide  the  technical  and  administrative  support  to  the  BRB  MC.  It  will  need  to  be  strengthened  through  the  assignment of a full‐time team.  Among its key functions are: coordination and networking,  capability‐building and IEC, and database and M and E.      Sub‐basin management councils will be set up for each of the seven sub‐basins and these will  be  reporting  to  the  BRBMC.  The  sub‐basin  management  councils  will  serve  as  the  implementation planning and coordination body for the sub‐basin.  Key members of the sub‐ basin  councils  should  include:  LGUs,  field  units  of  national  implementing  agencies,  PAMB,  water  districts,  academe,  business  sector,  FARMC,  representative  farmer  PO  or  irrigators’  association, relevant NGOs, CADT holder (in the sub‐basin with CADT), head of WQMA Board,  other  inter‐agency/multi‐sectoral  bodies  in  the  sub‐basin.  It  is  recommended  that  the  sub‐ basin management councils are headed by the Provincial local chief executive with the DENR  PENRO as co‐chair.        

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

15

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  At the area level, there are three key actors that have mandates to manage certain areas of  the  BRB  based  on  existing  national  laws  and  policies.  These  are  the  LGUs,  national  implementing  agencies  and  CADT  and  tenure  holders.  They  will  be  the  ultimate  implementing  units  of  the  BRB  master  plan,  with  the  support  of  their  partners  from  the  public, private and non‐government sector.        Proposed Structure for Implementing the BRB Master plan 

 

In addition to the operations of the BRB MC and PCO, several vital activities are also critical  to improving BRB governance: (a) training and capacity building, (b) IEC and social marketing,  (c)  M  and  E,  and  (d)  database  development.  These  are  to  be  continuously  carried  out  throughout  the  duration  of  the  plan  period  but  more  intensively  during  the  initial  years.  These  will  require  resources  to  implement,  thus  were  considered  in  the  master  plan  investment  requirements.  These  activities  will  cover  LGUs,  DENR,  NCIP  and  other  implementing  agencies  and  local  resource  management  units  to  improve  their  capability  to  lead  and  implement  the  BRB  master  plan.  The  training  and  capability  building  required  will  range from values formation, gender sensitivity, and leadership to very specific crop production  or forest rehabilitation technologies.      

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

16

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

 

6.0

INVESTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

  Over  a  15‐year  planning  period,  the  total  investment  requirement  to  implement  the  BRB  master  plan  is  about  Php31.332  billion.    The  first  five  years  of  implementation  will  require  Php8.46 billion while Year 6 to Year 10 year would need Php13.95 billion.  The last five years  up to Year 15 year requires Php8.93 billion.  About 62% of the proposed budget or Php19.5  billion will support programs to promote investment in production areas, mostly designed to  improve  irrigation  facilities  (29%  of  total  costs).  The  program  on  enhancing  resilience  of  ecosystems  and  communities  would  require  34%  of  the  total  estimated  cost  of  the  master  plan  or  Php10.7  billion,  which  is  almost  equally  divided  into  the  watershed  management,  DRRM enhancement and flood mitigation programs. The governance‐strengthening program  would require Php1.1 billion, representing 3% of the total estimated costs.      LGUs  would  need  Php9.6  billion  (31%  of  the  total  budget)  to  enhance  their  capabilities  in  DRRM,  update  their  CLUPs,  implement  waste  management  and  support  other  livelihood  activities.  The  rehabilitation  and  restoration  of  irrigation  facilities  and  development  of  new  irrigation systems by NIA account for 29.2% of the investment requirement or Php9.2 billion.   Implementation costs of other infrastructure projects to be sourced from DPWH total Php4.6  billion or 14.7% of total costs. Other major funding sources would be the DENR, Department  of  Agriculture,  Department  of  Interior  and  Local  Government,  and  Housing  and  Urban  Development Coordinating Council.    Summary of Costs for Implementing the BRB Master plan  Plan component 

Target 

Cost  (Php’000) 

Location 

Yr 1‐5 

Yr 6‐10 

Yr 11‐15 

Implem.  Agency 

Total 

Fund  Sources 

A. Programs to Enhance Resilience of Ecosystems and Communities  1. Disaster risk management enhancement program  

  

  

  

  

  

  

a.  Vulnerability assessment  and adaptation planning 

43  All LGUs 

21,500

0

21,500

43,000  LGUs 

LGUs 

b. CLUP updating  (integrating  FLUP, BRB master plan, PA  plans, CCA and DRRM plan  and other related plans) 

43  All LGUs 

43,000

0

43,000

86,000  LGUs 

LGUs 

c. DRRM training, EWS,  rescue equipment  

43  LGUs 

238,000

21,500

21,500

281,000  LGUs 

LGUs 

  

67,500

7,500

7,500

e. River easements mgm’t:   Mapping and demarcation  of river easements and  resettlement planning 

43  LGUs 

45,100

0

0

f.  Resettlement of settlers of   river easements 

6000  families 

0

1,125,000

1,575,000

d. Automatic weather  stations (AWS) 

  

2. Watershed Management Program    a. IEC and capability  strengthening 

  

  

43  LGUs 

  

  

82,500  PAGASA 

PAGASA 

45,100  LGUs 

LGUs/  sourcing 

2,700,000  LGUs/  DILG    

  

HUDCC/  sourcing    

172,000

129,000

64,500

365,500  LGUs 

LGUs 

b. Natural forests protection  and conservation project 

30,595 



15,298

15,298

15,298

45,894  DENR 

DENR  

c.  Rehabilitation of degraded  forestlands and protected  areas 

18,000 



270,000

270,000

0

540,000  DENR 

DENR  

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

17

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  Plan component  d. Multi‐storey agroforestry  development project in A  and D lands 

Target 

Location 

100,000 



e. Marketing support project  to farmer cooperators  

Yr 1‐5 

43  LGUs 

f.  Mangrove rehabilitation  

1000  Cabusao  Calabanga,  Bonbon 

3. Flood Control/ Mitigation 

 Sub Total 

Cost  (Php’000) 

12 

  



  

Yr 6‐10 

Yr 11‐15 

Implem.  Agency 

Total 

1,800,000

585,000

615,000

3,000,000  LGUs 

43,000

43,000

43,000

129,000  DTI 

30,000

0

0

132,000

2,588,550

639,900

2,877,398

4,784,848

3,046,198

Fund  Sources  LGUS/  private  owners  DTI 

30,000  DENR 

DENR  

3,360,450  DPWH 

Nat'l  gov’t/  sourcing 

10,708,444    

  

B. Programs to Promote Investments in Production Areas to Meet Demands for Ecosystems Goods and Services  1. Irrigation facilities improvement   

  

  

a. Rehabilitation and  restoration of existing  facilities 

4,933 ha  Based on  assessment 

b. Development of new  irrigation systems  c. Construction of Water  Retention Basins (sites)  

  

  

  

655,450   NIA 

 31,130  ha.  

Camarines                    0     3,891,250    3,891,250  Sur and Albay 

7,782,500   NIA 

7 sites 

Camarines   Sur and Albay 

10 

     300,000       400,000 

do 

2. Water quality management   

  

a. Water quality monitoring 

117  stations 

existing  stations 

b. Development of sanitary  landfill  



   0 

d. Training  for IAs 

    655,450 

  

14,250    

0  

0     

Nat'l gov't/  sourcing 

700,000    NIA  

0     

NIA 

Nat'l gov't/  sourcing 

14,250    NIA     

NIA 

  

  

126,000

126,000

126,000

8 clusters (Metro Naga;  Cam. Sur; Albay, Naga City)

880,000

440,000

440,000

1,760,000  LGU 

LGUs/  sourcing 

c. Establishment of waste  water treatment facilities  

Gov't  fac. and  28  markets 

122,100

590,150

81,400

793,650  LGU 

** 

LGUs/  sourcing 

d. Construction of septage  treatment facilities 

9 sludge  and 14  clusters 

0

168,000

190,450

358,450  LGU 

*** 

LGUs/  sourcing 

64,500

64,500

64,500

193,500  LGU 

LGUs/  sourcing 

9,000

0

0

e. Enforcement of the  43 LGUs  All LGUs  installation of septic tanks  and waste water treatment  f.  Lake zoning 

3 lakes (Buhi, Bato, Baao)

3. Socio‐Economic Development Program   

  

a. Development of bamboo  plantation 

13,000 

b. Organic farming 

45,000  All LGUs 

c. Farm‐to‐market roads 

**** 

  

9,000  BFAR    

  

DENR 

BFAR    

100,000

100,000

60,000

260,000  LGU 

LGU/ Private

225,000

225,000

225,000

675,000  LGU 

DA 

1,250,000   DPWH 

250,000

500,000

500,000

d. Water regulation and  potable water  development 

7  Sub‐basins 

140,000

140,000

0

280,000  LGUs 

LGUs/   sourcing 

e. Nature‐based tourism  development 

6  Mt. Isarog,  BNP, SMB,  Mt. Mayon,  lakes  

120,000

0

0

120,000  DOT 

DOT 

f.  Fisheries support project  (Micro‐financing) 

4  San Miguel  Bay and 3  lakes 

400,000

400,000

0

800,000  BFAR 

BFAR 

Vol

1:

Executive

250  kms/ TBD 

  

378,000  DENR 

Summary

18

|

DPWH 

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

  Plan component 

Target 

g. Provision of post‐ harvest  facilities   Sub Total 

Location 

7  Sub‐basins    

  

Cost  (Php’000)  Yr 11‐15 

Implem.  Agency 

Total 

Fund  Sources 

Yr 1‐5 

Yr 6‐10 

1,750,000

1,750,000

0

5,156,300 

8,794,900 

5,578,600 

2,500

0

0

2,500  DENR 

DENR 

3,500,000  DA 

DA 

19,529,800     

  

C. Program on Strengthening Governance of the BRB  1. Organization of Sub‐Basin   Management Councils 

5  sub‐ basins 

  Capability training for Sub‐ Basin Management  Councils 

7  councils 

17,500

10,500



28,000  DENR 

DENR  

2. Capability enhancement  training 

46  All LGUs 

115,000

69,000

69,000

253,000  DENR 

DENR 

3. IEC 

46  All LGUs 

69,000

69,000

69,000

207,000  DENR 

DENR 

4. Installation/ maintenance  of database management  system 

53  All LGUs/  councils  

53,000

53,000

53,000

159,000  DENR 

DENR 

5. Monitoring and evaluation 

46  All LGUs 

115,000

115,000

115,000

345,000  DENR/  LGU 

DENR/  LGU 

6.  Research 

variable 

  

50,000

50,000

0

Sub Total 

  

  

422,000

366,500

306,000

1,094,500    

100,000  DENR 

  

DENR 

TOTAL 

  

  

8,455,698  13,946,248 

8,930,798 

31,332,744    

  

27% 45% 28% a ‐ San Lorenzo Ruiz, Del Gallego, Lupi, Basud, Mercedes, Sipocot, Tinambac, Naga City, Calabanga, Pili, Ocampo, Tigaon, Libmanan, Iriga  City, Buhi, Oas, Polangui, Ligao city, Libon and Guinobatan  b ‐ Libmanan, Lupi, Sipocot, Basud, Calabanga, Naga city, Baao, Ocampo, Iriga City, Tinambac, Bato, and Libon  C ‐ San Lorenzo Ruiz, Lupi, Sipocot, Libmanan, Tinambac, Calabanga, Pamplona, San Fernando, Minalabac, Bula, Guinobatan, Camalig,  Ligao, Oas, Libon, Polangui, Bato  d ‐ Proposed locations: Naga, Ligao & Iriga city; along Pawili, Waras, Talisay & Bicol river (see location map) 

    Summary of Investment Cost by Implementing Agency  Agency/Sector

Cost (Php’000)

%

LGU 

9,641,150

30.77%

NIA 

9,152,200

29.21%

DPWH 

4,610,450 

14.71% 

DA 

3,500,000

11.17%

DENR 

1,915,894 

6.11% 

HUDCC/DILG

1,372,550

4.38%

BFAR 

809,000

2.58%

DTI 

129,000

0.41%

DOT 

120,000

0.38%

82,500

0.26%

31,332,744.00

100.00%

PAGASA   TOTAL 

     

Vol

 

1:

Executive

Summary

19

|

Page

Formulation of an Integrated Bicol River Basin Management and Development Master plan

 

7.0

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS  

  The  proposed  interventions  in  the  BRB  master  plan  have  a  total  financial  cost  of  Php31.33  billion.  The economic value of each of the programs and components were determined by  adjusting costs according to the shadow exchange rate factor of 1.10 for costs with foreign  currency  requirements;  and  shadow  wage  rate  factor  of  60%  of  the  nominal  wage  rate  for  unskilled labor.  Based on these adjustments, the total economic cost of all BRB master plan  interventions were valued at Php31.63 billion.  It was determined that, overall, the proposed  interventions are economically viable by satisfying the hurdle rates of a positive (greater than  nil) net present value for benefits, at Php4.43 billion, and at least 15% internal rate of return,  which was computed to be 22%.      The  proposed  investments  yield  both  market  and  non‐market  benefits.  Among  the  environmental  benefits  will  be  improved  ecosystem  resiliency,  better  ecological  stability,  improved water quality, improved biodiversity, among others, which are all public benefits.   The  investments  in  flood  control  such  as  the  retarding  basins  were  also  studied  from  the  perspective  of  its  public  benefits,  especially  in  reducing  damages  from  floods.    Sensitivity  analyses  of  (1)  a  10%  increase  in  investment  costs,  (2)  10%  decrease  in  benefits,  and  (3)  combination  of  10%  increase  in  costs  and  10%  decrease  in  benefits  indicate  that  the  proposed interventions are still economically viable.     

8.0

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF PROPOSED PROJECTS 

  The  proposed  project  investments  aim  to  optimize  the  quality  and  use  of  BRB’s  water  resources.  The  wastewater  treatment  facility  plants  will  help  improve  the  water  quality  of  surface waters in the downstream area and will have positive impacts on communities that  are  adjacent  to  the  public  markets.    The  construction  of  a  retarding  basin  will  address  the  flooding hazards in the BRB.  However, the investment will have positive and negative social  and  environmental  impacts  during  and  after  construction.  These  and  other  proposed  investments are provided with a preliminary assessment to serve as basis for more detailed  Environmental  Impact  Assessment  (EIA)  Studies  to  be  undertaken  and  submitted  to  DENR‐ Environmental Management Bureau once the plans are finalized.         

Vol

1:

Executive

Summary

20

|

Page