IGCSE GUIDE

to provide an introduction to a range of subjects and areas of knowledge. In Year 10 a degree of choice is introduced to allow students to develop the...

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IGCSE GUIDE 2018–20

MISSION STATEMENT Intus si recte ne labora – if the heart is right, all will be well

Shrewsbury International School offers an inspirational English language education for carefully selected students, caring for them in an organisation committed to continuous improvement, and providing outstanding opportunities both in and out of the classroom. We recruit the finest teachers and staff, providing them with the resources to nurture outstanding students and exemplify the pioneering spirit and traditions of Shrewsbury School. From our Junior School students, enthusiastically developing their interests and passion for learning, to our exemplary Sixth Form leaders graduating to embark on careers at the world’s leading universities, Shrewsbury International School is established around its innovative, ambitious, dynamic international community.

CONTENTS Introduction from the Head of Senior  

6

A Guide to the English National Curriculum and Key Stages  

8

The GCSE/IGCSE Programme  

9

A Typical Timetable  

11

An Overview of Year 10 and Year 11  

12

Core Subjects  

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English Language  

14

English Literature  

15

Mathematics  

16

Science  

17

Learning for Life  

19

Optional Subjects  

21

Art and Design  

22

Business Studies  

24

Computer Science  

25

Design Technology  

26

Drama  

27

Economics  

30

Geography  

31

History  

32

Modern Foreign Languages  

33

Music  

35

Religion, Philosophy & Ethics  

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Physical Education  

37

Psychology  

38

Thai First Language  

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Additional Information



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Our Organisational Values  

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Exam Course Information  

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INTRODUCTION FROM THE HEAD OF SENIOR In Years 7 to 9 all students follow the same curriculum, designed to provide an introduction to a range of subjects and areas of knowledge. In Year 10 a degree of choice is introduced to allow students to develop their individual interests and talents in greater depth. Even then the curriculum is designed to provide a broad and balanced range of courses and allow students access to a wide variety of learning and teaching styles. The curriculum is adapted by staff to ensure that it is relevant, stimulating and truly international. These adaptations ensure that our students are suitably well qualified to enter universities around the world after completing their education at Shrewsbury International School at the end of Year 13.

Making the right choices Few 14 year olds know exactly what they want to do when they leave school, and the career aspirations that they now have may well change over the next few years. According to research the average person should expect to change their career 3 or more times and their employer or job many more times. It is important that students make choices now that will keep open as many career paths as possible. For this reason students are strongly advised to take a broad and balanced selection of IGCSE subjects. We would encourage students to take a MFL, humanities and a creative subject, for instance. Choosing five options will allow students to study 10 or 11 IGCSE subjects, which is more than sufficient to meet the demands of universities anywhere in the world. Support is available from a number of staff to help students and their parents to make the right choices.

Independence and initiative The British Curriculum places increasing emphasis on students becoming independent learners able to use their own initiative. There is less emphasis on what students know – after all with modern technology it is possible to find the answer to most questions using a mobile phone – than on the higher level skills of communicating knowledge and understanding and analysing and evaluating evidence and the sources of this evidence. There is a temptation for students to want to know the ‘right’ answer and to rely upon tutors to drill this into them, but education is more than tutoring. All IGCSE subjects are taught by highly qualified members of staff who will guide their students throughout the course. They are adept at teaching the skills and attitudes required for successful independent learning beyond school and throughout life. Should a student find a particular aspect of a course difficult then their teachers will be able to help and advise students and their parents. I strongly encourage students to build up a dialogue with teachers and to ask for help as soon as an issue arises – knowing when to ask for help, not being afraid to admit that advice is required, is a sign of strength and an important life skill.

Beyond the classroom Academic study provides the tools for students not only to further their education at university, but an education for life requires far more than just book work. Whether in the Art Department, on the stage or concert hall, or on the playing field, our very talented senior students happily

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balance a heavy academic load with a range of “You-Time!” activities. The stimulus that these activities provide prepares students for the wider world and for university. Shrewsbury International School works with families to ensure that students have high academic expectations, achieve success in public examinations, and discover interests that will stay with them for life. We continue to be proud to teach our students to learn, to think independently, to challenge and to discuss, rather than be treated as empty vessels to be filled with facts. Our academic success speaks for itself! Intus si recte ne labora

Steven Allen Head of Senior

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A GUIDE TO THE ENGLISH NATIONAL CURRICULUM AND KEY STAGES The majority of schools in Britain follow a National Curriculum that is divided into Year Groups and Key Stages. Shrewsbury International School follows the British National Curriculum but adapts and develops it to meet the needs of our talented, multi-lingual, international students. The table below outlines the way in which the school and the curriculum are divided.

Age on 31 August

Year

3

EY1

4

EY2

5

Y1

6

Y2

7

Y3

8

Y4

9

Y5

10

Y6

11

Y7

12

Y8

13

Y9

14

Y10

15

Y11

16

Y12

17

Y13

Curriculum Stage [Examination Course]

School [Division]

Early Years Foundation Stage Junior School [Pre-Preparatory] Key Stage 1

Key Stage 2

Junior School [Preparatory]

Key Stage 3

Senior School

Key Stage 4 [IGCSE] Key Stage 5 [Advanced Level]

Senior School [Sixth Form]

In Britain, education is compulsory for all children between the ages of 5 and 18 although clear provision is made for students between the ages of 3 to 5. Children are placed in Year Groups based on their age on 31st August of each academic year. Year Groups are based upon chronological age and progress between Year Groups is usually automatic, although students may be out of their age group for exceptional reasons. Year Groups are clustered into Key Stages and a defined curriculum is produced for each Key Stage. Throughout each Key Stage there are clear assessments to monitor and track each child’s academic progress. Students study GCSE and IGCSE subjects over the two years of Key Stage 4, from the age of 14. All students study a compulsory core of English, Mathematics and Science plus a number of optional subjects. Students normally take 8 or 9 IGCSE courses. The IGCSE examinations are a formal assessment of a child’s ability in each of the subjects they have studied. Those who wish to go to university will continue into Year 12 and Year 13 (Key Stage 5, also known as Sixth Form), to follow two-year Advanced Level courses. GCSE and IGCSE are internationally recognised academic standards and used, alongside Advanced Levels, as part of the academic selection process for entry into the top universities around the world.

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THE GCSE/IGCSE PROGRAMME What are GCSE and IGCSE? GCSE stands for General Certificate of Secondary Education. GCSE examinations are taken by the vast majority of students in England and Wales. IGCSE stands for the International General Certificate of Secondary Education. It is at least of the same standard as, and in many cases is higher than, the GCSE. For many subjects it is more suited to students in International Schools where the courses and examinations will have an international flavour rather than being grounded in British situations and settings.

Examination boards There are many examination boards to choose from. Shrewsbury currently uses CIE and Edexcel, based in England. At the end of this booklet, you will find details of the exam boards and course syllabuses we use.

Grades available The grade range for IGCSE and GCSE examinations is A* - G. The bottom grade is U (for an ungradeable performance). In some subjects the A* - G range of grades may be split into two; A*- E for the extended level course and C - G for the core level course. The grade that students can obtain will therefore depend on what course they follow and what examination they sit. This may well be decided later on in the course. For some GCSE and IGCSE courses (Drama, Music, PE, Psychology, French, Spanish, Mandarin, Japanese, Maths and Religion, Philosophy & Ethics) there is a new numbered grading system that has been introduced by the UK government. In these courses students will receive their final grade (in the summer of 2020) as a number from 9 to 1 (with 9 being the highest grade possible). The number 4 will be equivalent to a C grade and a 7 to an A grade. The rest of the numbers are related to the A* to G grades according to the diagram below:

New GCSE Grading Structure NEW GCSE GRADING STRUCTURE

Broadly the same proportion of students will achieve a grade 4 and above as currently achieve a grade C and above.

4 =C and above

and above

Broadly the same proportion of students will achieve a grade 7 and above as achieve an A and above. The bottom of grade 1 will be aligned with the bottom of grade G. A grade 5 will be awarded to the top third of students gaining the equivalent of grade C or the bottom third of a grade B. The top 20% of those who get a grade 7 or above in each exam will be awarded a grade 9.

CURRENT GCSE GRADING STRUCTURE IGCSE GUIDE

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The subjects The timetable in 2018-2020 will be made up of 60 x 55 minute lessons over a 10-day cycle.

Compulsory subjects English 10 lessons Mathematics

7 lessons

Science

12 lessons

Physical Education

3 lessons (differs for students studying PE as an exam option)

Learning for life

2 lessons (non examined)

Students also choose five subjects from those on the following pages, one from each option block. Each option choice is allocated five lessons in the timetable. Thai students must choose First Language Thai. Students should read this booklet carefully and only make choices after careful consideration and discussion with their parents, teachers and other knowledgeable parties.

Optional Studies The table below is an example of how the option blocks may look. The final blocks may be adjusted once all students have made their choices. If a particular subject is oversubscribed it may be possible to add it to a second block although this will not always be possible.

OPTION 1

OPTION 2

OPTION 3

OPTION 4

OPTION 5

French

Art

Business Studies

Business Studies

Art

Mandarin

Business Studies

DT (Resistant Materials)

DT (Resistant Materials)

Geography

Spanish

DT (Graphic Products)

Drama

Economics

Music

Japanese

Drama

History

Geography

PE

Thai

Economics

Psychology

Computer Science

Psychology

History

Thai

Religion, Philosophy & Ethics

Thai

Thai

Poor reasons for choosing an option • “My friend is doing it”

• “The teacher is nice and does not make me work too hard”

Good reasons for choosing an option • “I am good at it”

• “I am interested in it”

• “I need to study it for future career plans”

• “It complements my other subjects”

Please contact Mr. Robert Millar, Assistant Principal (Academic), for more information on the curriculum, at [email protected]

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A TYPICAL TIMETABLE

Science

“YOU-TIME!”

LUNCH

REGISTRATION

Science

PERIOD 6

Geography

French

PERIOD 5

2

PERIOD 4

English

PERIOD 3

1

BREAK

PERIOD 2

PERIOD 1

REGISTRATION

DAY

At Shrewsbury we work on a 10-day timetable cycle. Every Monday throughout the academic year will either be Day 1 or Day 6 in the cycle. The day starts with morning registration where students meet up in their Form room with their Form Tutor. There are four lessons in the morning each of 55 minutes. Afternoon registration for seniors is just prior to lunch. There are two more lessons in the afternoon and a short break before the “You-Time!” and Excellence programmes begin.

DT

Maths

Maths

French

3

Geography

History

Computer Science

4

Maths

Science

Science

French

Science

Computer Science

5

Assembly

English

English

Maths

Science

PE

6

Geography

French

English

Computer Science

DT

PE

7

History

English

DT

8

Computer Geography Science

History

Learning for Life

9

10

Science

Maths

PE

English

Science

DT

Science

Science

English

French

Maths

History

Learning for Life

DT

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AN OVERVIEW OF YEAR 10 AND YEAR 11 YEAR 10 TERM 1 Late August

GCSE and IGCSE courses begins

TERM 2 January

1 week residential. In recent years this has been in Northern Thailand near Chiang Rai

TERM 3 June

End of Year internal assessments taken in all subjects Some Year 10 Mathematics students take IGCSE exam.

YEAR 11 TERM 1 October

Transition Evening: an introduction to Sixth Form

TERM 2 January

Mock examinations in all subjects

February

Futures Meetings (career guidance)

March

Preliminary choices made for A Level

TERM 3 May / June

GCSE and IGCSE Examinations

Late June

1 week residential and Sixth Form induction

AFTER THE END OF TERM August

IGCSE results published

Grade reports, full written reports and parent consultations occur on a regular basis throughout Year 10 and Year 11.

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CORE SUBJECTS

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE English is vital for communicating with others in school and in the wider world, and is fundamental to learning in all curriculum subjects. In studying English, students develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. They learn to express themselves creatively and imaginatively and to communicate with others confidently and effectively.

First Language English Course outline Students who study First Language English have a high level of language proficiency. The course is designed to develop students’ understanding and responses to different types of writing drawn from a variety of sources, both fiction and non-fiction, and different periods of time. Students will be expected to understand and collate implicit and explicit meanings from texts and learn how to make inference when reading a text independently. Students will also be expected to develop their writing in a variety of contexts, using a varied and sophisticated range of styles and conventions.

Assessment 50% of the final grade is based on a portfolio of the candidate’s work (around 3,000 words in total) which is sent to the examination board for appraisal in April of Year 11. 50% of the final grade is based on a two-hour examination where students read unseen texts and write about their interpretations and the writers’ use of language (three questions on two unseen texts).

English as a Second Language This subject is suitable for students whose first language is not English, but who use it as their language of study. The course is designed to develop better communication in English, in reading, listening, writing and speaking, and to develop an awareness of the nature of language learning and language learning skills.

Course outline Students need to show they understand different texts in English across a range of topics. Students learn how to take guided notes and write concise summaries of texts, and to express their thoughts, feelings and opinions in a number of different styles of writing. Developing accuracy in the uses of grammar, syntax and expression are also key components of the study of English as a Second Language. Talk is essential, and students are expected to engage in different types of discussion in all lessons.

Assessment 70% of the final grade is based on a 2-hour examination where students answer a number of questions on unseen texts and write in response to different types of extended writing tasks. 30% of the final grade is based on a listening examination (50 minutes). There is also a compulsory speaking examination (10 – 15 minutes) for which a separate grade is awarded.

Who do I contact for further details? Mrs. Victoria Rotheram, Head of English — [email protected]

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ENGLISH LITERATURE Through the study of Literature, students learn to become enthusiastic and critical readers of stories, poetry and drama as well as non-fiction texts, gaining access to the pleasure and world of knowledge that reading offers. Looking at the patterns, structures, origins and conventions of English helps students understand how language works, and to appreciate and interpret the choices made by a range of different writers.

Course outline English Literature complements the study of English Language, and any subject where students are asked to analyse writing and present cogent arguments. In their study of Literature, students read, interpret and evaluate different texts such as novels, poetry and plays. They will develop an understanding of literal and implicit meaning, relevant contexts and of the deeper themes and attitudes that may be expressed in writing. Students will learn to recognise and appreciate the methods in which writers use English in different ways to achieve a range of effects. A key element of the study of Literature is students’ responses to what they read: discussion of ideas is integral to the study of Literature, and students are encouraged to present informed, personal responses to what they study, both verbally and in writing. Students will read a range of interesting and diverse literary texts mostly from the 19th and 20th Centuries, and write essays exploring some relatively complex concepts.

Assessment 25% of the final grade is based on a coursework portfolio (approximately 2,000 words) which is sent to the examination board for appraisal in April of Year 11. The portfolio is designed to show a wide reading of, and a personal response to, novels, poetry and plays. 75% of the final grade is based on 2 examinations:

• an ‘open book’ examination on Drama (45 minutes). • a ‘closed book’ examination on Poetry and Prose ( 1 hour 30 minutes). Who do I contact for further details? Mrs. Victoria Rotheram, Head of English — [email protected]

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MATHEMATICS At Shrewsbury, all students in Years 10 and 11 must study IGCSE Mathematics. This is a two-year course leading up to two examinations in May/June of Year 11. The IGCSE syllabus follows on extremely closely from the Year 9 scheme of work, and so mastery of the topics covered in Year 9 will put students in the best place to succeed in the IGCSE course. Continuing on from Years 7 to 9, students will have seven taught periods per cycle; lessons will be varied and will include enrichment opportunities.

Course outline Throughout Years 10 and 11, students will review and extend their understanding of number, algebra, data and shape. Algebra is the key topic at IGCSE and mastering this will provide the grounding needed for progression to A-Level. Students will build upon the work covered in Year 9 and develop their ability to solve quadratic equations, manipulate expressions and solve simultaneous equations. They will also be introduced to calculus and functions. Pupils will also investigate and use geometrical relationships in both two and three dimensions. These will include: angle, Pythagoras’ theorem, trigonometry, vectors, area and volume. Students will also meet trigonometric graphs and be exposed to examples of their real-world applications. Successful candidates in IGCSE Mathematics are able to answer questions that require them to recall, apply and interpret mathematical knowledge, using combinations of skills and techniques. The full syllabus and a list of topics can be found on Firefly page for mathematics. We aim to have the vast majority of the teaching content completed by the end of the first term of Year 11. In the second term, we run a rigorous programme of revision, including a schedule of past papers and a whole year group revision morning.

Early Entry Some pupils may be selected to follow an accelerated pathway. These pupils will sit their IGCSE Mathematics examinations one year early, at the end of Year 10, having followed the Year 10 curriculum in Year 9 and the Year 11 curriculum in Year 10. In Year 11, students who have followed the accelerated pathway, will have the opportunity to study IGCSE Further Pure Mathematics (EdExcel) which will lead to an additional IGCSE. We strongly advise against any student, who is not following the accelerated pathway, from sitting their IGCSE early; universities do not look kindly upon this and it generally has a negative impact on their preparation for A-level. We do have a rigorous revision program that not only prepares students for the IGCSE, but also helps them to understand the underlying concepts so that they can make good progress at A level.

Assessment There is no coursework component for the EdExcel IGCSE Mathematics. Assessment will consist of two equally weighted written examination papers, each of which is two hours in length. A calculator will be permitted for both papers. All students will be graded on the 9-1 scale. Most students will follow the Higher tier curriculum and are eligible for grades 9 to 3. In some cases, we will enter students for the Foundation tier course where students can achieve grades 4 to 1.

Who do I contact for further details? Mr. Robert Groves Head of Mathematics — [email protected]

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SCIENCE At Shrewsbury International School students study either IGCSE Co-ordinated Science or IGCSEs in three separate sciences, based on ability and personal preference in Year 8 and 9. Both courses are taught in mixed ability classes in Year 9 and are taught over three years by three specialist teachers in Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Course outline The Co-ordinated Science syllabus has been designed to set the content, ideas, skills, processes and applications of science in the broadest possible contexts. It sets out to make the students continuously aware of the relationships between the main areas of science while allowing the subjects to keep their own identities. In Year 10, those students who shown exceptional ability in all these sciences in Year 9 may continue to study all three sciences as separate IGCSE courses. These courses cover the subjects in greater depth and those students will end up with three IGCSE grades at the end of Year 11. Those continuing with the Co-ordinated Science program will still be able to pursue any of the three sciences at A level, provided that they achieve the necessary grades. These students will end up with two IGCSE grades at the end of Year 11. Experimental work is an essential component of all sciences and is fitted into the courses at every available opportunity. The courses are taught in a series of modular topics which are tested internally at the end of each topic or topic group. This gives regular feedback to students, teachers and parents on a student’s progress in an individual topic, subject or the course as a whole.

Assessment External assessment is in the form of three written examinations: IGCSE Biology, IGCSE Chemistry and IGCSE Physics (separate)

• Paper 2- a multiple choice paper lasting 45 minutes, based on extension work. This paper will be weighted at 30% of the final total mark.

• Paper 4- a 1 hour 15 minutes consisting of short-answer and structured questions. This paper will be weighted at 50% of the final total mark.

• Paper 6- a 1 hour paper designed to test familiarity with laboratory based procedures. This paper will be weighted at 20% of the final total mark.

IGCSE Co-ordinated Science

• Paper 1 (a multiple choice paper lasting 45 minutes, based on core work only). OR

Paper 2 (a multiple choice paper lasting 45 minutes, based on extention work). This paper will be weighted 30% of the final total mark.

• Paper 3 (a two-hour core theory paper of short answer and structured questions, designed

to discriminate between grades C and G), OR Paper 4 (a two-hour paper consisting of short answer and structured questions designed to discriminate between A* and C). This paper will be weighted 50% of the final total mark.

• Paper 6- a 1 hour paper designed to test familiarity with laboratory based procedures. This paper will be weighted at 20% of the final total mark

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Grading The grades awarded for Co-ordinated Science are double grades, i.e. the students will receive 2 grades for Science e.g. A*A* or AA or BB (and so on). There are three papers for each of the separate sciences (9 in total) and grading for each of the subjects ranges from A* to G/U, giving three grades in total.

Who do I contact for further details? Mrs. Laura Garcia, Director of Science — [email protected]

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LEARNING FOR LIFE Learning for Life is a programme of study that is taught to all students across Key Stage 3 and 4, by two Lead Subject Specialists. In the UK, this curriculum programme is referred to as Personal, Social, Health, Citizenship and Economic (PSHCE) education. PSHCE is a school subject through which pupils develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to keep themselves healthy and safe, and to prepare them for life and work in the modern world. At Shrewsbury International School, Learning for Life equips pupils to live healthy, safe, productive, responsible and balanced lives. It encourages them to be enterprising and supports them in making effective transitions, positive learning and career choices and in achieving personal wellbeing. A critical component of our Learning for Life programme is providing opportunities for children and young people to reflect on and clarify their own values and attitudes and explore the complex and sometimes conflicting range of values and attitudes they encounter now and in the future. Our Programme of Study is based around three broad themes within which there is a broad overlap and flexibility: Core Theme 1: Health and Wellbeing Core Theme 2: Relationships Core Theme 3: Living in the Wider World The Learning for Life Programme of Study also aims to develop student’s spiritual, moral, cultural and social development. Students are expected to develop their knowledge and understanding of different world religions, philosophy and ethics through the inclusion of Religious Education. Our Higher Education Team, teach Year 9-11 the Pathways/Futures units. These units aim to maximize higher education applications and guide students to make informed decisions about their futures and develop career identity. Our school is committed to providing the highest quality Learning for Life education, therefore, we follow the guidance of the PSHE Association to best inform our learning and teaching practices. However, we also select content and topics that are appropriate and relevant to our students within the international school community here in Thailand.

Assessment Students are expected to demonstrate their learning and development in a number of ways. It would be inappropriate for Learning for Life to be about passing or failing given the nature of the content covered. To assess student engagement and progress in the subject, students will be expected to complete ‘Review and Reflect’ style assessments and will be given an attitude to learning grade at the end of each unit of work.

Who do I contact for further details? Ms. Catherine Garnett, Head of Learning for Life and RPE – [email protected]

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OPTIONAL SUBJECTS

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ART AND DESIGN The creative industry is the fastest growing sector in the UK, where most employers are seeking graduates who possess a creative mind. Art and Design complements all other subjects on the curriculum as it offers students the opportunity to develop many transferable skills such as creative problem solving, concept development, inventiveness, organisation, communication, self confidence and teamwork. An education in Art and Design is essential for anyone interested in a creative career such as architecture, graphic design, product design, medical illustration, textiles, fashion design, jewellery design, furniture design, ceramic design, interior design, photography and publishing as well as the fine arts of painting and sculpture.

Course outline The Cambridge IGCSE Art and Design syllabus provide opportunities for you to develop a range of skills, to stimulate aesthetic awareness and to deepen your knowledge and critical understanding of art. A personal and independent perspective is encouraged at all times. The course is split into two components, which are completed and examined in Year 11. Firstly you will complete Component 4: Coursework followed by Component 1: Examination. The syllabus is designed to accommodate a wide range of abilities, materials and resources. It will help you to become good at developing your own ideas through many Art processes and techniques. At the start of Year 10 you will be given a theme to research and explore. Year 10 is a foundation course, which is about developing and honing your skills when using a variety of media. Your investigation will begin by creating drawings, digital photographs and painting, which will underpin your inquiry. You will learn step by step how to realise art and design ideas from drawings through to end products/outcomes, so that you become confident in the subject and ready to complete the next stage. In Year 11, you work independently on your personal ideas with help and guidance from the Art team. The skills which you develop will allow you to pursue work in the following areas:

• • • • • •

Drawing in different media and styles; Painting in different media and styles; Printing using a variety of processes/techniques; Three dimensional studies – sculpture, ceramics and glass fusing; Textile media such as batik, felting and other processes; Digital imaging and photography.

Assessment Component 4: Coursework Assignment In Year 11 you will be given a major coursework project, which will form 50% of your final assessment. Students are allowed to choose from themes provided by the teacher. The coursework is examined by the Art team. Coursework is presented in the form of a portfolio and includes a final piece of work. Selected Candidates will submit their coursework to the exam board for moderation in February. 22

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Component 1: Observational/Interpretative Assignment (Examination Paper) The examination period begins earlier than other IGCSE subjects. The examination itself takes the form of a project and is 50% of your final assessment. You are allowed to choose from a list of examination themes. You have at least 8 weeks preparation time to create a portfolio of supporting work. The examination is 8 hours long split over two days. In this time you are expected to complete a final piece of art work. You may work in any way you wish. The work is then sent to CIE in the UK for examination. In January of each year there is a mock examination in school which is excellent practice and preparation for the real examination. The real examination takes place at the end of March or beginning of April.

Who do I contact for further details? Ms. Helen McCormick, Head of Art — [email protected]

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BUSINESS STUDIES In Business Studies you will be expected to take an interest in local and global business events and issues. The subject requires quite extensive reading and writing in response to business problems. An ability to handle numerical data is also required. It is unlikely that you will have studied the subject before, and this is not a requirement as the course assumes that you have no previous knowledge. In general, those students who are the most successful have a good grasp of the English language and are sound mathematicians - not daunted by graphs or other numerical data. A willingness to work hard and to take an interest in current events is obviously an essential requisite of success. Business Studies complements most other subjects and is a useful field of study for those interested in a career in business, management, finance, banking, accounting, and law.

Course outline This subject provides a general introduction to business behaviour and organisation in a real world context. Our aim is to provide you with an insight into business decision making by applying business theory to a wide selection of case study material drawn from many countries. The course includes modules in marketing, production, business organisation and communication, finance and accounting, and the place of business in the local, national and global community. You will develop skills in numeracy, report writing, analysis and problem solving, ICT applications, debate, discussion, research methods and teamwork. We encourage you to take a consistent interest in local and global business events and provide opportunities for you to undertake individual research. Wherever possible, outside visits will be arranged to locally based businesses.

Assessment Internally, you should expect to be formally tested once every half term, and a full, internal, mock examination is undertaken in January of Year 11. You will be assessed regularly on your ability to analyse business-related information, write business reports and handle numerical data in a variety of contexts. The external examinations which are taken at the end of year 11 consist of:

• Paper 1. Short Answers: One hour and thirty minutes. (50%). • Paper 2. Case Study Paper: One hour and thirty minutes. (50%). • There is no coursework. Who do I contact for further details? Ms. Rachel Plant, Head of Business Studies and Economics — [email protected]

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COMPUTER SCIENCE Computer science is the study of the foundational principles and practices of computational thinking and its application in the design and development of computer systems. It is an exciting, growing and challenging field that has impact in most aspects of everyday life. The Cambridge IGCSE Computer Science course enables learners to develop an interest in computing and gain confidence in writing computer programs using the Python programming language. Students will develop an appreciation of current and emerging computing technologies and the benefits of their use, while raising awareness of the ethical issues and potential risks that they also present. This course would particularly suit students who enjoy thinking analytically, solving mathematical puzzles and taking a logical, step by step approach to problem-solving. The aims of this course are to:

• develop computational thinking and an understanding of the main principles of solving problems by using computers

• develop understanding that every computer system is made up of sub-systems, which in turn consist of further sub-systems

• develop an understanding of the component parts of computer systems and how they interrelate, including software, data, hardware, communications and people

• acquire the skills necessary to apply this understanding to develop computer-based solutions to problems using a high-level programming language.

Students will study the following units: Paper 1 (Theory)

• • • • •

Data representation Communication and Internet technologies Hardware & Software Security Ethics

Paper 2 (Practical Problem-solving & Programming)

• Algorithm design and problem-solving • Programming in Python • Databases Assessment: The course is assessed through 2 written papers; there is no coursework. Both papers comprise of a series of short-answer and structured questions. There is no choice of questions. The externally assessed papers are weighted as follows:

• Paper 1: Theory 60% (75 marks) • Paper 2: Problem-solving and programming 40% (50 marks) Who do I contact for further details? Mr. Fabrice Blum, Head of Computung - [email protected]

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DESIGN TECHNOLOGY Students who have enjoyed their Year 7, 8 & 9 Design Technology lessons and are interested in developing their skills and abilities in design, practical work, CAD/CAM, graphics and mechanisms, and also have some ability in ICT and Mathematics, will benefit greatly from this course. The majority of the course is project based, with much of the theoretical knowledge being gained from the solving of practical problems. IGCSE Design Technology combines well with a balanced selection of sciences, ICT, art and/or mathematics. It is an ideal preparation for further study in product design, engineering, graphical design, architecture, interior design, industrial design etc. Design Technology is fun, practical and rewarding and will help you to develop real-life skills that will be useful throughout your life irrespective of you future occupation.

Course outline We offer two IGCSE Design Technology courses; Resistant Materials and Graphic Products. Whilst the designing and problem solving elements of the two courses are identical, in the Resistant Materials course you are expected to produce three-dimensional outcomes in resistant materials such as wood, metal and plastic, whilst with the Graphic Products course you are expected to produce primarily two-dimensional work using materials such as card, modelling foam, plastic sheet and, increasingly, computer-generated graphics. The subject’s theoretical content is mainly delivered through small-scale projects in Year 10, before the ‘Major Project’ is tackled in Year 11. The Major Project takes up almost the whole of Year 11 and is of the student’s own choosing under a given ‘theme’; the project is a great challenge and will be the most extended piece of coursework that students of this age will tackle in any subject. Success here proves not only that the student is an able design technologist, but also that they can work to deadlines, organise themselves over long periods of time and have those highly regarded qualities of dedication, resilience and perseverance. Minor projects will cover such areas as resistant materials, CAD/ CAM, graphics, packaging, control and mechanisms. The only limits to the Major Project are time, individual student ability and their imagination!

Assessment Assessment is carried out through two examination papers and one piece of coursework. The coursework is the aforementioned Major Project, which consists of a design portfolio and a piece of practical work; this counts for 50% of the final grade. The first examination is entitled ‘design’ and includes a question where the student is asked to design a solution to one of several problems that are set. The other paper is a more traditional examination paper, testing the theory that has been learnt during the two-year course. In the case of the Graphics Products option, this paper primarily tests the student’s technical drawing skills.

Who do I contact for further details? Mr. Mark Holloway, Director of Design Technology — [email protected]

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DRAMA You may have always wanted a go at creating a play, performing, making costumes, building a set or operating lights, but never had the chance. Drama GCSE would be a suitable option to take if you are practical, creative and enjoy working as part of a team. As well as developing your creative and imaginative skills, the study of Drama will also help develop your analytical, critical and interpretative skills that are vital for this subject and academic study as a whole. It is particularly complementary to the study of English Language and Literature as both subjects share many similar objectives and skills. To study Drama GCSE, you should have an interest in the Arts and an enthusiasm for learning about drama and theatre, as well as a good level of English. Drama is a useful foundation for any career, the most obvious of which would be in acting or film. However, it is beneficial for any career that requires fluent communication skills and an ability to work productively with others such as business, tourism, sales and marketing, and is valued and recognised by UK universities as being a subject which is extremely challenging and demonstrates commitment and the ability to work as a team. You will study a range of areas of study within your GCSE Drama course. These are designed to cover all areas which need to be considered in order to complete the required assessment work on the course. These would include such areas as: character, context and plot, structure, audience and performance space, improvisation, genre, styles and conventions and semiotics, amongst other things.

Course outline Year 10 Terms 1+2 Students will study a programme that will prepare them for their eventual assessment work in the subject. The first assessment unit which contributes to their overall GCSE result, will be completed during Term 3 of Year 10, with the remaining assessment units being completed during Year 11.

Year 10 Term 3 Component 1: Devising (1DR0/01) – 40% of overall qualification (60 marks) This component deals with devising, which is an exciting and challenging opportunity to work collaboratively with others to explore a range of stimuli in order to create an original performance piece. Devising is essential for the development of new theatre and performance; it allows for personal development and exploration. It allows both performer and designer the opportunity to stretch the limits of their creativity and imagination, while exploring a theme or topic of interest to them and their intended audience. Students will develop skills in group work, research and negotiation, while also developing creativity, performance and design skills. Students will consider the impact that they can make on an audience, as they develop the ideas they want to communicate.

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Assessment 1. a devised performance/design realisation (15 marks) 2. a written coursework portfolio covering the creating and developing process and analysis and evaluation of this process (45 marks) The portfolio submission choices are:

• handwritten/typed evidence (1500–2000 words) or • recorded/verbal evidence (8–10 minutes) or • combination of handwritten/typed evidence (750–1000 words) and recorded/verbal evidence (4–5 minutes)

Year 11 Term 1 Component 2: Performance from Text (1DR0/02) – 20% of overall qualification (48 marks) Performance texts have been at the core of drama since the inception of theatre. The need to hand down stories has been fundamental to human development and for thousands of years, people have written, performed, watched and enjoyed innumerable plays. Understanding a performance text is fundamental to the subject, as this provides students with opportunities to explore plot, structure, narrative and stories from around the world and from different time periods. It encourages them to develop empathy skills, as they consider different characters and develop methods of communicating ideas and themes. This component deals with developing knowledge, understanding and skills in exploring and performing from a performance text. Students will interpret this text and rehearse and refine two key extracts, leading to a final performance. They will demonstrate and use a wide range of acting and/or design skills to communicate their interpretation in performance.

Assessment • Students will either perform in and/or design for two key extracts from a performance text, chosen by the centre

• Students can perform individually (a monologue), with a partner (a duologue) or in groups of between 3 and 8 students

• Performances should last between 2-3 minutes (a monologue) and 20 minutes (a large group piece)

• Performer or designer routes available Year 11 Terms 2+3 Component 3: Theatre Makers in Practice (1DR0/03) Written Examination: 1 hour 30 minutes - 40% of overall qualification (60 marks) This component focuses on the work of theatre makers and the theatrical choices that are made by crucial members of the creative and production team in order to communicate ideas to an audience. As theatre makers, students will be developing their knowledge and understanding of the ways in which drama can create meaning for an audience through performance. Students will explore practically how a complete performance text might be interpreted and realised from ‘page to stage’. This exploration will give students an insight into how texts may be brought to life for an audience and the creative roles within this process. Students will also analyse and evaluate their experience of a live theatre performance as informed members of the audience. They will develop skills to recognise the meaning created in the theatre space in order to communicate ideas to an audience. This will give them a more critical and varied approach to their own work as theatre makers.

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Assessment There are two areas of focus: 1. A study of one complete performance text (set texts prescribed by examination board) 2. A live theatre evaluation Section A: Bringing Texts to Life (45 marks) • This section consists of one question broken into six parts (short and extended responses) based on one extract from the chosen performance text

• Performance texts are not allowed in the examination as the extracts will be provided Section B: Live Theatre Evaluation (15 marks) • This section consists of two questions requiring students to analyse and evaluate a live theatre performance they have seen

• Students are allowed to bring in theatre evaluation notes of up to a maximum of 500 words Who do I contact for further details? Ms. Kay Sanders, Head of Drama — [email protected]

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ECONOMICS In Economics you will be expected to take an interest in local and global economic events and issues. The subject requires quite extensive reading and writing in response to economic problems. An ability to handle numerical data is also required. It is unlikely that you will have studied the subject before, and this is not a requirement as the course assumes that you have no previous knowledge. In general, those students who are likely to be the most successful will have a good grasp of the English language and be sound mathematicians, not daunted by graphs or other numerical data. A willingness to work hard and to take an interest in current events is an essential requisite of success. Economics complements most other subjects and is a useful field of study for those interested in a career in finance, banking, business, management, accounting, and law.

Course outline This subject provides a general introduction to how economic systems work in a real world context. Our aim is to provide you with an insight into economic decision making by applying economic theory to a wide selection of material drawn from many countries. The course includes modules in the operation of markets and market failure, international economics, economic problems such as unemployment and inflation, government policy and economic growth and development. You will develop skills in numeracy, essay writing, analysis, evaluation, problem solving, ICT applications, debate, discussion, research methods and teamwork. We encourage you to take a consistent interest in local and global economic events and provide opportunities for you to undertake individual research.

Assessment Internally, you should expect to be formally tested once every half term, and a full, internal, mock examination is undertaken in January of Year 11. You will be assessed regularly on your ability to analyse economics related information, write extended answers and handle numerical data in a variety of contexts. The external examinations which are taken at the end of Year 11 consist of: Paper 1. Multiple Choice: Forty five minutes (30%). Paper 2. Structured Questions: Two hours fifteen minutes (70%). There is no coursework.

Who do I contact for further details? Mr. Jon Kyte, Head of Economics — [email protected]

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GEOGRAPHY “The study of Geography is about more than just memorizing places on a map. It’s about understanding the complexity of our world, appreciating the diversity of cultures that exists across continents. And in the end, it’s about using all that knowledge to help bridge divides and bring people together.” — President Barack Obama For students who are curious about the real world outside the classroom, Geography provides opportunities to deepen their understanding of the complex planet on which they live. IGCSE Geography increases knowledge and confidence in dealing with challenging issues of both the physical and human environment. It examines several case studies from a variety of scales and countries at different stages of development. Through a variety of activities including map skills, analysis, problem-solving, debate and handson fieldwork– it is never dull! Students enjoy the scope of the work they cover, the insights it provides into understanding the world around us and the present-day nature of the issues it tackles. Geography is the great adventure with a purpose which leads on to a wide range of careers.

Course outline IGCSE Geography complements the Sciences and Business/Economics , but also gives you chance to practise lots of the techniques that you learn in Mathematics. The syllabus covers a range of topics including volcanoes, earthquakes, population, weather and climate, rivers and coastal environments, plus much more! During lessons you will develop a range of graphical, numerical and analytical skills. You will use ICT and multimedia resources to explore new concepts and processes. During the two-year course you will also undertake compulsory field work in Year 10 to support your learning.

Assessment There are 3 examination papers and no coursework. Geography students will be entered for the highly respected University of Cambridge examination.

• Paper 1: Gives a choice of questions which focus on knowledge and understanding. • Paper 2: Is short answer questions assessing analytical skills such as interpretation of numerical data, graphs, maps, photographic evidence and newspaper articles.

• Paper 4: Tests practical skills which will have been developed previously during field trips and classroom study.

Who do I contact for further details? Mr. Paul Williams, Head of Geography — [email protected]

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HISTORY • Are you an inquisitive person who enjoys thought-provoking discussion and hard work? • Are you someone who is interested in people who have influenced and shaped our past and future?

• Are you the type of person who is not afraid to question and be critical of things around you? • Do you want to be a well-informed and active citizen who can contribute something worthwhile to your community?

• Do you want to gain a prestigious and academic qualification that can open the doors to most professions and education courses after your IGCSE courses?

If you are answering ‘’yes’’ to the majority of these questions then History is a great choice of subject for you to study at IGCSE.

Course outline The syllabus is split up into core content and a depth study. Core content: International Relations since 1919. This addresses the following key questions:

• • • •

Were the Peace Treaties of 1919-23 fair? To what extent was the League of Nations a success? Why had international peace collapsed by 1939? Who was to blame for the Cold War?

Depth study: Germany 1918-45. This addresses the following key questions:

• • • •

Was the Weimar Republic doomed from the start? Why was Hitler able to dominate Germany by 1934? How effectively did the Nazis control Germany 1933-45? What was it like to live in Nazi Germany?

Assessment Candidates will be assessed by sitting three examination papers. Papers 1 and 2 are both two hours in length. Paper 4, which is the alternative to a coursework component of the examination, lasts one hour. Candidates will be assessed on their ability to recall, select, organise and deploy their knowledge; to demonstrate their understanding of cause and consequence, change and continuity, similarity and difference; to show their understanding of the motives, emotions, intentions and beliefs of people in the past; to comprehend, interpret, evaluate and use a range of sources as evidence in their historical context.

Who do I contact for further details? Mr. Stuart Howard, Head of History — [email protected]

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MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES The Modern Foreign Languages currently available at Shrewsbury International School are French, Japanese, Mandarin and Spanish. To opt for a Modern Foreign Language in Year 10, you must have studied the language in Year 8 and 9 as the courses will build on this and introduce you to new language structures and vocabulary. A Modern Foreign Language rewards practical communication skills and adds an international dimension to your studies. It will appeal to all types of students including those interested in travel, culture and people from different countries, as well as those students who always have something to say! The world has become a much smaller place and the ability to communicate in different languages will place you in a strong position for interesting employment in a wide variety of careers. Having a language as one of your A-Level choices when you enter the Sixth Form strengthens your academic profile.

Course outline French During the French course students will develop the four language skills – namely listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course offers a variety of activities with topics that include: media, entertainment and youth culture, education, employment, social activities, fitness and health. You will learn about French culture by studying some authentic texts, films and songs and you will develop your understanding of Ftrench grammar through interactive tasks. Japanese During the Japanese course students will develop the four language skills – namely listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course offers a variety of activities with topics that include: media, entertainment and youth culture, education, employment, social activities, fitness and health. Students will learn to use more than 200 Kanji characters, and will know how to use appropriately the polite forms of the language and the various verb tenses. The culture of Japan will be explored through the language and you will find out more about annual celebrations, food and traditional cultural activities. Mandarin During the Mandarin course students will develop the four language skills – namely listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course offers a variety of activities with topics that include: media, entertainment and youth culture, education, employment, social activities, fitness and health. Students will be expected to learn how to use over 1000 Chinese characters by the time they reach GCSE level. During the course you will learn about the culture of China through Chinese songs, and studying cultural events such as the Dragon Boat Festival, the Mid-Autumn Festival and, of course, Chinese New Year Spanish During the Spanish course students will develop the four language skills – namely listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course offers a variety of activities with topics areas that include: media, entertainment and youth culture, education, employment, social activities, IGCSE GUIDE

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fitness and health. Students will also learn more about the Spanish-speaking world, the different geographical areas of Spain and they will start to explore the culture, cuisine and everyday life of Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries.

Assessment You will be assessed in each of the four skills. This includes a speaking test that your teacher will carry out with you. You will be required to answer questions in both English and the target language in the reading and listening papers. You will also complete translation tasks so a good comman of English is needed. There are two tiers: Foundation level (grades 1-5) and Higher level (grades 5-9)

Who do I contact for further details? Ms. Anna Pethybridge, Head of Modern Foreign Languages — [email protected]

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MUSIC GCSE Music is designed to offer students the opportunity to explore and enjoy music in its broadest sense. Performance experience on any instrument or voice is beneficial. The recommended standard of entry at the start of the course is ABRSM Grade 3. However the course syllabus is designed to encourage students who have not followed the traditional route of ABRSM examinations. Rock guitarists, singers and drummers are encouraged along with pianists, orchestral players and performers on traditional instruments. Students who have exceeded ABRSM Grade 3 will be at an advantage. The GCSE Music qualification demonstrates a knowledge of performance and creativity and is therefore well respected by universities. It is regarded as useful for students interested in pursuing careers in the Media as well as the Music Industry.

Course outline There are three distinct areas of study: Listening Students study set works covering the history of music from 1650 until the modern era. Performing Students are required to record two performances by the end of the course, a solo performance and a performance as part of a group. These can be recorded at any time during Year 10 or Year 11. It is expected that the final performance should be around Grade 5 standard (or equivalent) Composing Students will compose two original works, up to three minutes in length. Most works are composed using computer software – although this is not a requirement.

Assessment — Listening(40%) Students sit a 90-minute examination at the end of Year 11. Excerpts from the 8 set works will be played on a CD during the examination. — Performing(30%) Performances will be recorded and marked at school before being sent to Edexcel in London for moderation. Students are allowed to record performances several times before selecting their submission. — Composing(30%) Compositions are marked in school and sent to Edexcel in London for moderation.

Who do I contact for further details? Mr. Stephen Jackman, Head of Academic Music — [email protected]

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RELIGION, PHILOSOPHY & ETHICS IGCSE Religion, Philosophy and Ethics is a course for students who enjoy thought-provoking discussion, critical thinking and constructing well-informed arguments. Our approach to the study of religion is relevant to today’s pluralistic society and global community, and challenges students to engage with divergent views between and/or within religions and beliefs. Students are provided with a unique opportunity to explore both religious and non-religious viewpoints and values, delve into philosophical questions and debate current ethical issues. Students can develop their knowledge and understanding of teachings, sources of wisdom and authority and religious texts. Religion, Philosophy and Ethics is deemed a prestigious and academic qualification which leads into professions and educational courses in law, politics, education, foreign affairs, international business, journalism and many more.

Course outline For the exam, all students will be expected to learn about at least two different religions, as well as a variety of beliefs and attitudes within these two religions, and non-religious views, such as humanism. The course includes a balance of Religion, Philosophy and Ethics. Paper 1: Beliefs and Values (Paper 1) • The Universe, Creation and the Place of Human Beings

• Life and Death • Peace and Conflict • Rights, Equality and Social Justice Paper 2: The Religious Community (Paper 2) • Origins and their Impact on the Community

• Celebration and Pilgrimage • Worship and Pilgrimage Assessment Students will be assessed by sitting two examination papers. Paper 1: Beliefs and Values is 1 hour 45 minutes, and Paper 2: The Religious Community is 1 hour 30 minutes. Both papers assess knowledge, understanding and the ability to analyse and evaluate aspects of religion, beliefs and values, including their significance and influence. Students will also be expected to show knowledge, understanding and the ability to analyse and evaluate non-religious views about life, death and the universe.

Who do I contact for further details? Ms. Catherine Garnett, Head of Religion, Philosophy and Ethics – [email protected]

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION The academic study of GCSE Physical Education provides learners with an opportunity to study both the practical and theoretical aspects of Physical Education and Sport. Students receive a well rounded introduction to the world of PE, Sport and Sport Science by developing an understanding of how the mind and body work in relation to performance in physical activity. This new GCSE assesses students through 3 practical performances, a Personal Exercise Programme (PEP) and 2 externally examined papers.

Course content Component 1 — Written examination (36%) Fitness and Body Systems — Applied anatomy and physiology, Movement analysis, Physical Training and Use of Data Component 2 — Written examination (24%) Health and Performance — Health, fitness and well-being, Sport psychology and Socio-cultural influences Component 3 — Practical Performance (30%) This is a non-examined assessment: internally marked and externally assessed. Students are assessed in 3 Sports — 1 team activity, 1 individual activity and a free choice. Skills will be assessed in isolation and a competitive/formal situation. Component 4 — Personal Exercise Programme (10%) Students will carry out a planned, monitored and evaluated PEP

Who do I contact for further details? Mr. Ian Radcliffe, Head of PE — [email protected]

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PSYCHOLOGY Psychology is a fascinating subject to study because it is primarily all about you! This course will appeal to anyone who is interested in exploring issues relating to how and why human beings think, feel and behave in different situations. Students of Psychology will study a range of stimulating topics such as mental health, memory, social influence and the brain. They will also be introduced to many current applications of psychology; for example, how psychological sleep disorders are explained and how criminal psychologists try to rehabilitate and reduce criminal and anti-social behaviour. Psychology complements many other GCSE and IGCSE choices. It is a science and therefore involves the planning and implementation of investigations. It will also require students to use their mathematical skills in order to present, interpret and analyse data. Throughout the course, skills of language and critical thinking will be developed as students learn how to discuss, present and reflect on the various psychological theories. It is therefore a subject that appeals to students who have interests in either science or more art/humanities based subjects. Following a GCSE course in Psychology, students can opt to continue the subject at A level. Higher level studies of Psychology can lead to a variety of occupations including clinical, criminal, occupational or educational psychology. A qualification in Psychology provides students with many important transferable skills, useful to careers such as Medicine, Business and Education.

Course outline Students study 7 topics that each address a key Psychological question: • Development – How did you develop? • Memory – How does your memory work? • Psychological problems – How would psychological problems affect you? • The brain and neuropsychology – How does your brain affect you? • Social influence – How do others affect you? • Criminal psychology – Why do people become criminals? • Sleep and dreaming – Why do you need to sleep and dream? Across all these topics, students will consider key debates in psychology, including ‘reductionism/ holism’ and ‘nature/nurture’, research methods and associated issues e.g.validity and reliability.

Assessment Students are assessed at the end of Year 11 with two external examination papers. • Paper 1 is 1 hour and 45 minutes long and consists of six compulsory sections. The first five sections each cover the first five topics listed above. These sections will include multiple choice, short-open and open-response questions. The sixth section will contain two extended open-response questions. These questions will focus on debates within psychology and the interrelationships between the core areas of psychology.

• Paper 2 is 1 hour and 20 minutes long, and students complete three sections. The first

compulsory section focuses on research methods, and questions can be based on any of the key topics. It will contain question types that include calculations, multiple choice, shortopen and open-response questions, and one extended open-response question. The last two optional sections will cover the Criminal and Sleep topics. These sections will include multiple choice, short-open and open-response questions, and one extended open-response question. Calculators may be used in the examination.

Who do I contact for further details? Mrs. Bethany Haresnape, Head of Psychology — [email protected] 38

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THAI FIRST LANGUAGE

Thai IGCSE allows students to develop their ability in using Thai effectively for practical communication. Moreover, they form a sound base for the skills for language and attitudes required for further use of Thai in study, work and leisure as well as encouraging positive attitudes to the learning of languages and cultures. The programmes and qualifications are designed to support learners in becoming:

• • • • •

Confident in working with information and ideas – their own those of others Responsible for themselves, responsive to and respectful of others Reflective as learners, developing their ability to learn Innovative and equipped for new and future challenges Engaged intellectually and socially, ready to make a difference

Course outline • Critical thinking skills • Reading for meaning • Reading and responding to writing • Descriptive and personal writing • Discursive and argumentative writing • Narrative writing • Creative thinking and reasonable writing • Understand and respond appropriately to Thai language and culture • Read widely, use relevant vocabulary and employ correct Thai grammar IGCSE GUIDE

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• Ability to analyse, synthesis, make inference, order facts and present opinions • Demonstrate a good command of vocabulary, grammar, punctuation and spelling • Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and attitudes Assessment Candidates for Cambridge IGCSE First Language Thai comprises take two compulsory components Papers 1 and 2. Both papers are externally assessed. Paper 1: Reading and Directed Writing (Weighting: 50%) 2 hours Candidates answer all questions.

• Section 1 comprehension and Use of Language (25 marks) −− Candidates answer a series of questions on Passage 1, a fiction text. • Section 2 Directed writing (25 marks) −− Candidates answer one question on Passages 2 and 3 which are non-fiction and have

linked theme. The passages will be taken from newspapers, magazines, online materials or other publications.

• Candidates write a response of about 250-350 words. Paper 2: Composition (Weighting 50%) 2 hours Candidates answer two questions, one in Section 1 and one in Section 2.

• Section 1 Ar gumentative /Discursive writing (25 marks) −− Candidates answer one question from a choice of four and write a response of about 350 450 words.

• Section 2 Descriptive and Narrative writing (25 marks) −− Candidates answer one question from a choice of four and write a response of about 350 450 words. Who do I contact for further details? Kru Thom - [email protected] Kru Fon – [email protected]

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

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OUR ORGANISATIONAL VALUES Selectivity We endeavour to bring together exceptional students into our community of learning, whether these students are outstanding in the classroom, concert hall, sports field, on stage or simply in person. Each part of the school adopts best practices for its admissions, ensuring careful, precise and fair selectivity at all stages of entry. We are a selective school where ambition, determination and the pursuit of excellence are carefully nurtured.

Exceptional People We are a caring, thoughtful community of exceptional people; from our talented students and ambitious parents to our hand-picked fully-qualified staff. The Shrewsbury environment is peoplecentred. We recognise achievements of all kinds and continue to develop the professional skills of our primary asset, our staff. Our community engages parents as part of the learning process.

Commitment & Renewal We are a school that is engaged in a process of continual improvement, growth and renewal, recognising the rapid changes required to keep pace with developments in education. Our development plans are dedicated to bringing quality staff to school whilst ensuring the committed investment in infrastructure and facilities. Our purpose-built school is modern, contemporary and designed to enhance the learning experience of students of the 21st century.

Outstanding Opportunities We offer an impressive range of activities to extend the interests and horizons of every student. Our Excellence Programmes challenge and support students gifted in music, visual and performing arts and sport. We offer scholarships to exceptional students through a selection process that is rigorous, transparent and fair.

English Language We are a community of language learners that recognises that the speaking of English brings our international community together. Shrewsbury students understand that the ability to think, learn and communicate in English will allow them to achieve their very highest potential at school, university and in the world of work.

Care & Compassion Shrewsbury understands the pressures on young people in the modern world. Our teachers pride themselves on the care they give to children and the partnership they form with parents to allow children to be happy as well as successful. From community action to unparalleled university counselling, Shrewsbury endeavours to give priority to the highest standards of pastoral care.

The Shrewsbury Way Intus si recte ne labora — We are a British international school that whilst being contemporary is firmly in the tradition of our sister school in the UK. We share its exemplary standards of achievement, care and governance and enjoy all the advantages of our location. Our learner profile provides a pathway that has served generations of Salopians—as our motto relates, if the heart is right, all will be well.

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EXAM COURSE INFORMATION GCSE Examinations Level Subject Syllabus code Exam Board GCSE Chinese (Mandarin) 1CN0 Edexcel GCSE Drama 1DR0 Edexcel GCSE French 1FR0 Edexcel GCSE Japanese 1JA0 Edexcel GCSE Music 1MU0 Edexcel GCSE Psychology 1PS0 Edexcel GCSE Spanish 1SP0 Edexcel GCSE Physical Education 1PE0 Edexcel IGCSE Examinations Level Subject Syllabus code Exam Board IGCSE Art and Design 0400 CIE IGCSE Biology 0610 CIE IGCSE Business Studies 0450 CIE IGCSE Chemistry 0620 CIE IGCSE Computer Science 0478 CIE IGCSE Co-ordinated Science (Double Award)

0654

CIE

IGCSE Design and Technology 0445 CIE IGCSE Economics 0455 CIE IGCSE English as a Second Language

0510

CIE

IGCSE English Literature 0486 CIE IGCSE First Language English 0500 CIE IGCSE Geography 0460 CIE IGCSE History 0470 CIE IGCSE Mathematics 4MA1 Edexcel IGCSE Philosophy and Religious Studies

4R50

Edexcel

IGCSE Physics 0625 CIE IGCSE Thai 0518 CIE

Edexcel www.edexcel.com CIE (Cambridge International Examinations) www.cie.org.uk OCR (Oxford, Cambridge and RSA Examinations) www.ocr.org.uk

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