Integrated Approach in Developing Sustainable Tropical

Website: www.istap.ugm.ac.id ISBN: 978-979-1215-26-8 ... I hope all of you enjoy the seminar and Jogja as well! Dr. Cuk Tri Noviandi Editor in Chief i...

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The 6th ISTAP

International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production “Integrated Approach in Developing Sustainable Tropical Animal Production”

PROCEEDINGS PART I

October 20-22, 2015 Yogyakarta Indonesia

ISBN: 978-979-1215-26-8

Published by: Faculty of Animal Science, Universitas Gadjah Mada Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 2015

The 6th ISTAP

International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production “Integrated Approach in Developing Sustainable Tropical Animal Production”

PROCEEDINGS commemorating:

October 20-22, 2015 Yogyakarta Indonesia

ISBN: 978-979-1215-26-8

Published by: Faculty of Animal Science, Universitas Gadjah Mada Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 2015

PROCEEDINGS The 6th ISTAP

International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production

October 20-22, 2015, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

“Integrated Approach in Developing Sustainable Tropical Animal Production” Published by: Faculty of Animal Science Universitas Gadjah Mada ISBN: 978-979-1215-26-8 ©2015, Faculty of Animal Science Universitas Gadjah Mada No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any forms or by any means, electronic or mechanical, now known or heretofore invented, without written permission from the publisher.

Address: Faculty of Animal Science, Universitas Gadjah Mada Jl. Fauna 3, Kampus UGM, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia Phone : +62-274-513363/+62-274-560868 Fax : +62-274-521578 Email: [email protected] Website: www.istap.ugm.ac.id

Editor-in-Chief Cuk Tri Noviandi (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Editorial Board Subur Priyono Sasmito Budhi (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Zaenal Bachruddin (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Ristianto Utomo (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Widodo (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Soeparno (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Yuny Erwanto (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Adiarto (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Ismaya (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Tety Hartatik (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Wihandoyo (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Endang Baliarti (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Krishna Agung Santosa (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Sudi Nurtini (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Budi Guntoro (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Nanung Danar Dono (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Zuprizal (Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia) Keshav L. Maharjan (Hiroshima University, Japan) Henning Otte Hansen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark) Yukinori Yoshimura (Hiroshima University, Japan) Allen Young (Utah State University, USA) Yanin Opatpatanakit (Maejo University, Thailand) Editorial Staff Rima Amalia EW, Prisilia Putri S, Miftahush S Haq, Septi Mulatmi, Aditya Alqamal, Riyan Nugroho A, Pradiptya AH, Satyaguna R, Zefanya AG, Bagas Pamungkas

PREFACE On behalf of Faculty of Animal Science, Universitas Gadjah Mada, I am pleased to present you the 6th International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production (ISTAP) which is held on October 20 – 22, 2015 at Auditorium drh. Soepardjo, Faculty of Animal Science UGM, Yogyakarta. Under the main theme “Integrated Approach in Developing Sustainable Tropical Animal Production”, we expect that information and ideas on animal production systems in the tropics and its related problems will be shared among participants, thus we can elaborate an integrated approach in developing sustainable tropical animal production. I believe, this can be achieved since more than 250 animal scientists, researchers, students, and producers from more than 15 countries join this seminar. In this moment, I have to address my great thanks to all people who have contributed for the success of this seminar. First, to all participants, thank you for your contributions, time, and efforts in participating in all sessions in this seminar. We also would like to extend our gratitude to the reviewers and editors for dedicate their expertise and precious time in reviewing and editing the papers. I deeply appreciate the hard work of all members of the Steering Committee, Organizing Committee, and students of Faculty of Animal Science UGM for making this seminar achieved a great success! I hope all of you enjoy the seminar and Jogja as well!

Dr. Cuk Tri Noviandi Editor in Chief

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REPORT FROM ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Dear all of the scientists, delegates, participants, ladies and gentlemen, Praise be to The Almighty for His Merciful and Beneficent to raise up this memorable moment for all of the scientists and delegates from all over the world who were interested in Animal Science field to meet up together. On behalf of all the members of Board Committee, it is my great pleasure and honor to welcome all of you and impress thankful, and present a high appreciation for your participation in joining the 6th ISTAP in Yogyakarta, one of the Special Region in Indonesia where culture and tradition live in harmony with the modern nuance and educational spirit makes it a beautiful venue of this seminar. During this event, we have distinguished scientists from all over the world to present plenary papers Livestock Management, Production, and Environment; Feed, Land, and Landscape for Sustainable Animal Production; Livestock Industry and Technology; Economics, Social, and Culture in Livestock Development; and Special issue on Halal Food, Safety and Regulation. It is noted that around 200 scientists as well as livestock producers, companies, graduate and postgraduate students from 15 countries attend the seminar; and more than 160 research papers will be presented. We can see great enthusiasm of all the scientists to solve livestock problems as well as to share valuable information and knowledge for human prosperity all over the world. The 6th ISTAP Program consists of scientific and technical programs as well as social and cultural activities. The scientific and technical programs offer 4 plenary sessions, field trip, and many scientific sessions (both oral and poster presentation). The social and cultural programs of the 6th ISTAP are very important as the scientific and technical programs since the promotion of friendship and future scientific cooperation are also central to this seminar. Opening Ceremony offers you the Seminar Program a glance. Participants will attend a warm invitation from Dean Faculty of Animal Science UGM in a Welcome Dinner that will give you the most memorable moment to attend. Field trip activity offers a wonderful sightseeing to the most spectacular natural landmark in Yogyakarta, Merapi Lava Tour and Ulen Sentalu Museum. We do hope that you will not miss any of these wonderful opportunities. Closing Ceremony will be held on October 22nd, 2015, immediately after the last session of presentation. The 6th ISTAP award will be announced for some participant as an appreciation for their valuable research. Finally, on behalf of 6th ISTAP Committee, I wish all of the participants having a great achievement of success and fulfill the expectation as well as enjoying the interaction with all scientists participating in the seminar. High appreciation I may acknowledge to the Rector of Universitas Gadjah Mada and Dean Faculty of Animal Science UGM, who have concerned to facilitate the seminar site host. Special thank to the Steering Committee, Scientific Committee, Reviewers and Editorial Boards for their great contribution to make the seminar successfully organized. Terima kasih (Thank you). Sincerely Yours, Prof. I Gede Suparta Budisatria, Ph.D Chairman The Organizing Committee of the 6th ISTAP

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WELCOME ADDRESS Selamat pagi (Good morning) Dear Rector of Universitas Gadjah Mada, all of Invited Speakers, honorable guests, all of delegates, participants, distinguished guests, Ladies and Gentlemen Attendants of The 6th ISTAP, It is my great pleasure and honor to extend a warm welcome to all of you at The 6th International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production, which be held on October 20 – 22, 2015 at Auditorium drh. Soepardjo, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta Indonesia. This seminar is proudly organized by Faculty of Animal Science Universitas Gadjah Mada. The contribution of this seminar to the development of national food security is truly significant for introducing of new scientific knowledge and equipments that is much needed in Indonesia to maintain a safe and secure environment and to look at more effective ways to meet future challenges. We can see great enthusiasm of the entire participant to present their latest research as well as to share valuable information and knowledge for human prosperity all over the world. In these 3 days of seminar, we have invited some Plenary Speakers and Invited Papers who are qualified as scientists and bureaucrats in animal science field to share their valuable information and knowledge. Other participants can deliver their precious research through oral and poster presentations. Finally, on behalf of Faculty of Animal Science, we would like to extend our sincere gratitude to the Minister of Rural, Rural Development, and Transmigration, Republic of Indonesia, Mr. Marwan Jafar, for his generosity to be with us here to give Keynote Speech. Then, it is our great honor and pleasure to have qualified scientists and bureaucrats as Plenary Speakers and Invited Papers to share their valuable knowledge during the plenary and concurrent sessions. Moreover, special thank you is for the Steering Committee, Scientific Committee, Reviewers and Editorial Boards for their great contribution to make the seminar a great success. Also, we would like to congratulate and deliver high appreciation to the Organizing Committee as the organizer for their great contribution and generous efforts to make the seminar successfully organized. And to all of the participants, I hope that this seminar will always success and bring some acknowledgement for all of us. Also, I wish all of the participants having a great achievement of success and fulfill the expectation as well as enjoying the interaction with all participants. With all of our hospitality, we will try our best to make your brief visit to our country become a wonderful and memorable moments. We are looking forward to meeting you all in the future event. Wish you all a very pleasant and most enjoyable stay in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, beside you scientific journeys. Terima kasih (Thank you). Sincerely Yours, Prof. Dr. Ali Agus Dean Faculty of Animal Science UGM

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OPENING REMARKS Dear all of Scientists, distinguished guests, delegates, participants, Ladies and Gentlemen, On behalf of Universitas Gadjah Mada, I am happy to welcome you and present a high appreciation for your participation in joining the 6th International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production hosted by the Faculty of Animal Science UGM in Yogyakarta from 20 – 22 October 2015. Under the theme of “Integrated Approaches in Developing Sustainable Tropical Animal Production”, we do hope that this seminar concludes with shared ideas and best practices, technology, and global networks that are required to increase animal production. The increase of animal production as one source of food is crucial to feed the world given that the population is expected to increase from 6 billion to about 8.3 billion in 2030. According to FAO (2008, 2009), the consumption of animal food increased from 10 kg/per annum in 1960, 26 kg/per annum in 200, and it is expected to be 37 kg/per annum. Animal production is an integral part of food production and contributing for the quality of human food supply. Animal and agricultural production is an important component in the integrated farming systems in developing countries as this produces high quality foods, provides job opportunities in rural areas, as well as enriching livelihood. As a tropical country with high animal biodiversity, Indonesia and other tropical countries, have a variety number of indigenous and local animal genetic resources and germ plasm. This variety of animal germ plasm could be explored and developed not only for animal and food production but also for animal conservation. Apart from being exploited as food resources, it is therefore important to consider animal conservation. Conservation will protect the genetic potency of local bred and their family, and the domesticated animal bred, and this would secure our future food resources. In these 3 days of seminar, we believe those aforementioned issues will be discussed, and technical solution as well as recommendation will be provided to solve the existing problems in tropical animal production. Finally, on behalf of Universitas Gadjah Mada, we would like to congratulate and thanks to the Faculty of Animal Science UGM as the organizer for their great efforts to make the seminar successfully organized. To all of participants, I wish all of you have a great discussion and interaction with other scientists participating in the seminar as well as enjoying your time in Yogyakarta. Thank you Prof. Ir. Dwikorita Karnawati, M.Sc., Ph.D. Rector of Universitas Gadjah Mada

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LIST OF CONTENTS PREFACE ....................................................................................................................................iii REPORT FROM ORGANIZING COMMITTEE.....................................................................iv WELCOME ADDRESS.................................................................................................................v OPENING REMARKS ...............................................................................................................vi LIST OF CONTENTS.................................................................................................................vii PLENARY SESSION 1. Strategies to Increase the Domestic Production of Raw Milk in Indonesia and Other South East Asian Countries John Moran and Phillip Morey...............................................................................................1-11 2. Nutritional Challenges of Lactating Dairy Cattle in a Tropical Climate J. K. Bernard...........................................................................................................................12-17 3. Feed, Land, and Landscape for Sustainable Animal Production Shaukat A. Abdulrazak a and Isaac M. Osugab..................................................................18-18 4. Food Safety Regulation and Halal Food Issues in Indonesia Roy Sparringa.........................................................................................................................19-19 5. Extension System for Livestock Development in Developing Countries: Knowledge Management Application Budi Guntoro............................................................................................................................20-27 6. Structural Development of Livestock Farms in a Global Perspective Henning Otte Hansen..............................................................................................................28-50 7. Whole Farm Problems with Heat Stress – It’s Not Just for Lactating Dairy Cows Allen Young..............................................................................................................................51-57 LEAD PAPER 1. Antimicrobial Peptides Expression for Defense System in Chicken Gastrointestinal and Reproductive Organs Yukinori Yoshimura, Bambang Ariyadi, and Naoki Isobe......................................................58-60 2. Improving Technology Adoption and Sustainability of Programs to Increase Bali Cattle Productivity in West Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia Yusuf A. Sutaryono, T. Panjaitan, and Dahlanuddin..........................................................61-66 3. The Role of Family Poultry Systems in Tropical Countries Yusuf L. Henuk, Monchai Duangjinda, and Chris A. Bailey..............................................67-71

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SUPPORTING PAPERS Part I Animal Feed and Nutrition The Marl and Kaolin in Broiler Diet: Effects on the Bone Weight and the 1. NM-03-P Cutting Yield D. Ouachem, A. Meredef, and N. Kaboul.........................................72-75 2. NM-04-P

The Effect of Liquid Nanocapsule Level on Broiler Fat Quality Andri Kusmayadi, Zuprizal, Supadmo, Nanung Danar Dono, Tri Yuwanta, Ari Kusuma Wati, Ronny Martien, Sundari....................76-79

3. NM-05-O Production and Egg Quality of Quail Layer Given Diets Containing Different Levels of Crab (Portunus pelagicus) by-Product Meal K.G. Wiryawan, Syamsuhaidi, D.K. Purnamasari, and T.S. Binetra...................................................................................80-84 4. NM-08-P

A Preliminary Study on the Use of Enzyme and Organic Acids in Rice Bran-containing Diet at Two Levels of Dietary Protein for Rabbit Tuti Haryati and Yono C. Raharjo....................................................85-89

5. NM-09-O Efficacy of Toxin Binder in Reducing Induced Aflatoxin B and Ochratoxin A in Broiler Feed Anjum Khalique, Muhammad Umer Zahid, Jibran Hussain, Zahid Rasool...................................................................................................90-93 Evaluation of Local Feed in Broiler Diets in Small Scale Farm in Palu 6. NM-10-O Central Sulawesi Hafsah, Hidayat, Fatmawati, M. Sagaf, Mappiratu, and T. Sapan........................................................................................94-99 Digestibility and Nutritional Value of Gedi (Abelmoschus manihot 7. NM-11-O (L.) Medik) Leaves Meal in the Diet of Broilers Jet Saartje Mandey, Hendrawan Soetanto, Osfar Sjofjan, Bernat Tulung..................................................................................100-104 8. NM-12-O Utilization of Skipjack Tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis L.) Gill in Diet as a Source of Protein on Carcass Quality of Broiler Chickens Jein Rinny Leke, Jet S. Mandey, Meity Sompie, Fenny R. Wolayan............................................................................................105-109 9. NM-13-O

The Dynamics of Indigenous Probiotics Lactic Acid Bacteria on Growth Performance, Total Adherence Bacteria, and Short-Chain Fatty Acids Production in the Ileum of Male Quail Sri Harimurti, Sri Sudaryati and Bambang Ariyadi...................110-110

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10. NM-14-O Selection of Human-origin Lactobacillus Strains as Probiotics with Capability in Synthesizing Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Alleviating Hyperglycemia in Rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Vivo Widodo, Pradiptya Ayu Harsita, Samuel Aditya, Nosa Septiana Anindita, Tutik Dwi Wahyuningsih and Arief Nurrochmad...........................................................................111-116 11. NM-15-O

Production Performance and Quality of Eggs of Laying Hens Fed Diets Supplemented with Plants Rich in alpha-Linolenic Acid Lilik Retna Kartikasari, Adi Magna Patriadi Nuhriawangsa, Winny Swastike and Bayu Setya Hertanto..................................117-117

12. NM-16-O

Performance of Japanese Quails Fed Different Protein Levels and Supplemented with Betaine Adi Ratriyanto, Rysca Indreswari, Adi Magna Patriadi Nuhriawangsa, Apriliana Endah Haryanti..................................118-122

13.

NM-17-O

The Influence of Vitamin D3 Levels on Diets with Phytase on Production Performance ofLayer Quail (Coturnic coturnic japonica) Adi Magna Patriadi Nuhriawangsa, Adi Ratriyanto, Winny Swastike, Rysca Indreswari, Ahmad Pramono and Try Haryanto.............123-126

14.

NM-20-O



Phytobiotics Habbatus Sauda and Garlic Meal: Are Still Efficacious During the Spread of Marek’s Disease Outbreak? N.D. Dono, E. Indarto, Kustantinah, Zuprizal.............................127-131

15. NM-22-O

The Effect of Dietary Calcium and Phosphorus Level on Serum Mineral Contents of the Bantul Local Duck within a Day H. Sasongko, T. Yuwanta, Zuprizal, Supadmo, and I. Widiyono...............................................................................132-132

16. NR-01-P

Suplementation Local Feed Urea Gula Air Multinutrient Block and Different Levels of Sulphur for Increase Lactation Productivity Doe Also Decrease Kid Mortality Bligon Goat Grazed at Timor Savannah Arnold E. Manu, Yusuf L. Henuk, H.L.L.Belli, M.M. Kleden......133-137

17. NR-02-P Methane Production and Rumen Fermentation Characteristics of Buffalo Ration Containing Sorghum Silage with Rumen Simulation Technique (RUSITEC) Methods Teguh Wahyono, Dewi Apri Astuti, Komang G. Wiryawan, Irawan Sugoro, Suharyono..........................................................................138-142 18. NR-04-O

Body Weight Gain Response of Sumba Ongole Cattle to the Improvement of Feed Quality in East Sumba District, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia Debora Kana Hau and Jacob Nulik...............................................143-146

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19. NR-05-O Daily Body Weight Gain of Bali Cattle Fed with Leucaena Leucocephala as the Main Ration in West Timor, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia Jacob Nulik and Debora Kana Hau...............................................147-150 20 NR-06-O

Tannin Anthelmintic Doses, Metabolizable Energy and Undegraded Protein Contents of Rubber Leaves (Hevea brasiliensis) as Herbal Nutrition for Goats Sri Wigati, Maksudi Maksudi, Abdul Latief and Eko Wiyanto ..151-155

21. NR-07-P

Consumption and Digestibility of Nutrients in Bali Cattle at the Last Period of Pregnancy Kept under Semi Intensive System Supplemented with Nutritive Rich Feed Contained Lemuru Oil and Zinc Erna Hartati, E.D. Sulistijo, A. Saleh............................................156-160

22. NR-08-P

Preliminary Screening for Anthelmintic Potential of Sesbania grandiflora Leaves for Parasitic Infected Goats in Short-Term Trial Mohd Azrul Lokman, Kanokporn Phetdee, Sathaporn Jittapalapong and Somkiert Prasanpanich...........................................................161-165

23. NR-09-O

The Effect of Urea Treated Straws and Urea-Molasses Feed Blocks (UMB) on Reproductive Performance of Libyan Barbary Sheep Mabruk, H.S., H .A. Salim, A. E. Benshaban, A.E. Ahtash, H.E.Daeky and Z.N. Elmeshabic.......................................................................166-172

24. NR-10-O

Effect of the Inclusion of Dried Bovine Ruminal Contents in the Diet of Growing Sheep on Productive Performance and Meat Quality A. Muñoz-Cuautle, M.E. Ortega-Cerrilla, J. Hernández-Bautista, J. Herrera-Haro, C. Gutiérrez-Olvera, J.L. Figueroa-Velasco.......173-176

25. NR-11-O

Chemical Composition, Antioxidant Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity of Ensiled Coffee Pulp G. Munguía-Ameca, M.E. Ortega-Cerrilla, P. Zetina.Córdoba, J. Herrera-Haro, A. Díaz-Cruz, R. Guinzberg-Perrusquía, M. SotoHernández, R. Bárcena-Gama.......................................................177-181

26. NR-12-O

Influence of Starch Type as Substrate Material in Dry Lactic Acid Bacteria Inoculant Preparation on Fermentation Quality and Nutrient Digestibility of King Grass Silage B. Santoso, B. Tj. Hariadi and Jeni...............................................182-186

27. NR-13-O

Responses of Growing-Female Crossbred Ettawa Goats Fed Concentrates Containing by product of Traditional Fried Snack Industry with Different Levels of Urea A R. S. Asih, K G. Wiryawan, I. N. Sadia, and Kertanegara.........187-190

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28. NR-14-O Restriction Feed and Refeeding Evaluation for Consumption, Feed Cost, Income Over Feed Cost, Percentage of Carcass and Meat Quality Kacang Goat Bambang Suwignyo, Miftahush Shirothul Haq, Setiyono, and Edi Suryanto...........................................................................................191-197 29.

NR-15-O

Characteristics of polyunsaturated fatty acids and nutrient digestibility feed cattle of the fermented rumen fluid by one and two stage in vitro Riyanto, J, E. Baliarti, T. Hartatik, D.T. Widayati and L. M. Yusiati.............................................................................198-202

30.

NR-16-P

Performance and Economic Efficiency of young Anglo-Nubian Goat Fed Different Protein and Energy I-G.M.Budiarsana, Supriyati and L. Praharani...........................203-207



31. NR-17-P Effect of Choline Chloride Supplementations on Productive Performance of Ettawa Crossbred Goats Supriyati Kompiang, I Gusti Made Budiarsana, Rantan Krisnan, Lisa Praharani..........................................................................................208-212 32. NR-18-O

Body Weight Gain of Donggala Bull Given Supplement Feed on Basis of Cocoa Pod Husks Fermentation F.F. Munier, Mardiana Dewi, and Soeharsono.............................213-217

33. NR-19-O

Influence of Cellulolytic Bacteria from Rumen Fluid on In Vitro Gas Production of Robusta Coffee Pulp (Coffea canephora Sp.) Fermented Chusnul Hanim, Lies Mira Yusiati, and Fahriza Anjaya Jazim....218-222

Growth and Productivity of Brachiaria brizantha cv MG 5 under the 34. NR-20-P effect of different dose of NPK fertilization Nafiatul Umami, Meita Puspa Dewi , Bambang Suhartanto, Cuk Tri Noviandi, Nilo Suseno, Genki Ishigaki, Ryo Akashi...............................................................................................223-227 35. NR-21-O Indigofera Sp as a Source of Protein in Forages for Kacang Goat in Lactation and Weaning Period A. Nurhayu and Andi Baso Lompengeng Ishak...........................228-232 36. NR-22-O

Supplementing Energy and Protein at Different Degradability to Basal Diet on Total Protozoa and Microbial Biomass Protein Content of Ongole Grades Cattle Dicky Pamungkas, R. Utomo, dan M. Winugroho.........................233-237

37. NR-24-O

Nutritive Evaluation of Pineapple Peel Fermented by Cellulolytic Microbe and Lactic AcidBacteria by In Vitro Gas Production Technique Lies Mira Yusiati, Chusnul Hanim and Caecilia Siska Setyawati..................................................................238-242

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38. NR-25-O

The Supplementation of ZnSO4 and Zn-Cu Isoleusinate in the Local Feed Based at Last Gestation Period on Dry Matter Consumption and Digestibility and Calf Birth Weight of Bali Cattle FMS Telupere, E Hartati, and A. Saleh........................................243-247

NR-26-P 39.

Local Micro Organisms (LOM) as an Activator to Enhance the Quality of Various Plant Waste as Feed Andi Ella, A. Nurhayu and A. B. Lompengeng Ishak....................248-251

40. NR-27-O

Organic Acid and Inhibition of Complete Silage Ration on the Growth of Salmonella enteritidis Allaily, Nahrowi, M. Ridla, M. Aman Yaman...............................252-256

NR-28-O 41.

The utilization of some feed supplement by using or without molasses on local male sheep on fermentation results in rumen liquid, daily live weight gain, production, C/N ratio and water content of feces Suharyono, Teguh Wahyono, C. Ellen. K and Asih Kurniawati..............................................................................257-260

NR-29-O 42.

Evaluation of Albazia chinensis as Tannins Source for in Vitro Methane Production Inhibitor Agents Sheep Rumen Liquor Anas, M. A., Yusiati, L. M., Kurniawati, A., Hanim, C...............261-265

43. NR-30-O

Growth and Productivity of Sorghum Bicolor (L.) Moench in Merapi Eruption Soil with Organic Fertilizer Addition Suwignyo, B, B. Suhartanto, G. Pawening, B.W.Pratomo...........266-270

44. NR-31-P

Quality and Storability of Pelleted Cassava (Manihot utilisima) Leaves var. Bitter Ristianto Utomo, Subur Priyono Sasmito Budhi, Cuk Tri Noviandi, Ali Agus, and Fidrais Hanafi..........................................................271-274

NR-32-O 45.

Biomass Production of Pueraria javanica Using Rhizobium Inoculant and Urine Bali Cattle in East Borneo Ida Ketut Mudhita, Nafiatul Umami, Subur Priyono Sasmito Budhi and Endang Baliarti .......................................................................275-280

NR-33-P 46.

The Effect of Using Different Sources of Carbohydrates to Feed Efficiency on Indigenous Thin Tailed Male Lamb Muktiani, A, A. Purnomoadi, E. Prayitno....................................281-285

47. NR-35-O

Substitution of Concentrate by Protein Source Forage for Growing Heifer of Friesian Holstein (FH) Y. Widiawati and M. Winugroho..................................................286-290

The Use of Tricodherma sp. as a Starter of Fermentation Dry Teak Leaves 48. NR-38-O (Tectona grandis) as Animal Feed Yunianta and Hartatik....................................................................291-295 xii

49. NR-39-P

Nutritive Values of Rice Straw Fermentation Used Carbon Sources on Different Level With Various of Inoculant Levels Aspergillus niger and Lactobacillus plantarum R. Agus Tri Widodo Saputro, Nono Ngadiyono, Lies Mira Yusiati, I Gede Suparta Budisatria...............................................................296-300

50. NR-40-O The Fat Protective Effect of Fish Oil, Sunflower Seed Oil and Corn Oil on Fluid Rumen Fermentation Parameters Agustinah Setyaningrum, Soeparno, Lies Mira Yusiati and Kustantinah......................................................................................301-305 51. NR-41-O

The Effect of Supplementation of Gliricidia or Rice Bran on Liveweight Gain, Feed Intake and Digestibility of Kacang Goat Fed Mulato Grass Marsetyo, Damry and Mustaring..................................................306-310

52. NR-42-P

In Sacco Feeding Value of Multi-Stage Ammoniated Palm Press Fiber Armina Fariani, Arfan Abrar and Gatot Muslim..........................311-311

53. NR-43-O Alternative Rations to Maintain High Growth Rate of Bali Bulls Fattened with Leucaena Based Diet in Sumbawa, Eastern Indonesia T. S. Panjaitan.................................................................................312-315 54. NR-44-O

The Use of Ramie By-Product (Boehmeria nivea) Materials as Complete Feed on the Growth and Hematology of Weaning Ettawa Cross Breed Goat Emmy Susanti, Ali Agus, Y. Y. Suranindyah, and F. M. Suhartati..................................................................................316-320

55. NR-45-O

Study on Complete Feed Fermentation of Agricultural By-Product on Performance Etawah Goat Yusdar Zakaria, Yurliasmi, Cut Intan Novita.............................321-325

56. NR-46-P Carcass Production and Component of Lamb Provided Metanogenic Inhibitor Feed E.H.B. Sondakh, L.M. Yusiati, E. Suryanto, J.A.D. Kalele, F.S. Ratulangi...................................................................................326-330 Small Ruminant, Beef Cattle, Animal Draught and Companion Animal 57.

PPO-01-O

Correlation between the Slaughter Weight, Carcass Weight, with Body Measurements of Cattle in Kebumen, Central Java Setiyono, Suharjono Triatmojo, Trisakti Haryadi, Dino Eka Putra ..........................................................................................................331-334

58. PPO-02-O Production of Stingless Bees (Trigona sp.) Propolis in Various Bee Hives Design Agus salim, Nafiatul Umami, Erwan............................................335-338

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59. PPO-03-P Morphological Characteristics and Performance Boerawa Goat in Tanggamus District Lampung Province Kusuma Adhianto and M. Dima Iqbal Hamdani........................339-342 60. PPO-04-P

Growth, Carcass Production and Meat Quality of Ongole Grade Cattle, Simmental Ongole Crossbred Cattle and Brahman Cross N. Ngadiyono, Soeparno, Panjono, Setiyono and I. Akhmadi...............................................................................343-347

61. PPO-06-O

Growth and Rumen Environment of Pre-weaning Bali Calves Offered Different Forage Based Calf Supplements IGN Jelantik, ML Mullik, TT Nikolaus, T Dami Dato, IG Mahardika, NP Suwiti, C Leo Penu, J. Jeremias, A. Tabun...........................348-352

Waste Utilization to Increase Productivity Growth Bali Cattle and Coffee 62. PPO-07-P Plants I Nyoman Suyasa and IAP.Parwati..............................................353-358 63. PPO-08-O Effect of Different Lands on Heat Tolerance Coefficient and Body Weight Gain of Ram Fat Tailed Sheep Rachmawati, A., H. Nugroho and E. Y. Wanto............................359-359 The Effects of Hair Colors Differences on the Performance of Etawah 64. PPO-09-O Grade Doe I Gede Suparta Budisatria, Panjono, Dyah Maharani...............360-364 65. PPO-10-P

Age and Body Weight at Puberty and Service per Conception of Ongole Crossbred Heifer on Smallholder Farming System Endang Baliarti, Bayu Andri Atmoko, Febri Aryanti, Nono Ngadiyono, I Gede Suparta Budisatria, Panjono, Tri Satya Mastuti Widi, M. Danang Eko Yulianto, Sigit Bintara..............................................365-369

66. PPO-11-O

Performance of Three Breeds of Sudanese Cattle Hassan Ishag Hassan Haren and Hatim Idris..............................370-373

Poultry Science 67. PU-01-P

Biosecurity Measurements in Poultry Farming System in Kuwait A.A.Alsaffar.....................................................................................374-376

68. PU-03-O

Effect of Mating and Polymorphism Insulin Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 Gene on Body Weight and Heritability of Kampung Chicken Sri Sudaryati, J.H.P. Sidadolog, Wihandoyo, W.T. Artama..........377-381

69.

The Residue Profile of Ciprofloxacin in Broiler Muscle and Liver Agustina Dwi Wijayanti, Ambarwati, Wa Ode Sitti Falah Ramli................................................................382-386

PU-05-O

xiv

Selection for 10 Weeks Old Body-Weight on Sentul Chicken Sofjan Iskandar and Tike Sartika..................................................387-390

71. PU-07-O

Analysis of Reproductive Potential and Hatchability of Naked Neck and Normal Hens Jafendi H.P.Sidadolog, Tri Yuwanta, Wihandoyo, Sri Harimurti, Sri Sudaryati, Heru Sasongko and Bambang Ariyadi.........................391-396

72. PU-08-O

Localization and Molecular Size of Mucin2 Glycoproteins Forming theGut Mucosal Barrier in the Indonesian Indigenous Naked Neck and Normal Feathered Chickens B. Ariyadi, J.H.P. Sidadolog, S. Harimurti, S. Sudaryati, and Wihandoyo.......................................................................................397-400



70. PU-06-O

Dairy Science and Industry 73. PPP-01-P

Milk Quality Of Anglo Nubian X Etawah Grade Goats And Saanen X Etawah Grade Goats At First Kidding Period Lisa Praharani, Supryati, and Rantan Krisnan............................401-405

74. PPP-02-O

Performance of Dairy Cattle with Supplementation of Rumensin, Garlic Husk (Allium sativum) and Organic Minerals in Ration Caribu Hadi Prayitno, Suwarno, and Afifah Noor Hidayah........406-409

75. PPP-04-O

Trends of Dairy Population and Milk Production in Boyolali, Central Java, Indonesia N. Hidayah, B.Guntoro, E. Sulastri, Y.Y. Suranindyah................410-414

Changes in Pathogen Number during Preservation of Milk Derived from 76. PPP-05-O Mastitic Dairy Cows N. Isobe, K. Hisaeda, T. Koshiishi, M. Watanabe, H. Miyake, Y. Yoshimura........................................................................................415-417 77. PPP-06-P

Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase1 (DGAT1) Gene Polymorpism in New Zealand Holstein Friesian Cattle under Dairy Breeding Station and Its Correlation with Milk Quality SA. Asmarasari, C. Sumantri, IW Mathius, A. Anggraeni...........418-422



Reaction of Cathelicidin-2 secreted from goats milk leukocytes to 78. PPP-07-O lipopolysaccharide Moemi Nishikawa, Yukinori Yoshimura, and Naoki Isobe..........423-425

xv

PART II Animal Breeding and Reproduction 79. PPE-01-P

Identification of Pure Breed Bali Cattle by Using Molecular Approach Endang Tri Margawati, Indriawati, Slamet Diah Volkandari and Muhammad Ridwan.......................................................................426-431

80. PPE-02-P

Milk Transmitting Ability of Saanen Bucks under Intensive Management Anneke Anggraeni...........................................................................432-436

81. PPE-03-O Genetic Markers of Twinning Births of Local Beef Cattle and Its Crossbreds in Indonesian A. Anggraeni, S. A. Asmarasari, H. Hasinah, C. Talib and B. Tiesnamurti.................................................................................437-441 82. PPE-04-P

Association of Prolactin Gene with Egg Production in PMp Ducks T. Susanti and I. P. Sari..................................................................442-446

83. PPE-05-P

Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity in Pekin, Alabio, and their crossbred duck populations L. Hardi Prasetyo, T. Susanti, T. Purwadaria...............................447-447

84. PPE-08-P

Genotypic Profile of Ettawa Grade Goat with Different Head and Neck Color Based on MC1R Gene Dyah Maharani, I Gede Suparta Budisatria, Panjono, Tety Hartatik and Slamet Diah Volkandari..........................................................448-451

85. PPE-09-O

Polymorphism of Promoter Prolactine Gene and Its Association with Egg Production of Selected Indonesian Kampung Chicken (KUB) Tike Sartika.....................................................................................452-452

86. PPE-10-O

Qualitative And Quantitative Traits of Kokok Balenggek Chicken, the Rare Indigeneous Chicken in West Sumatera Firda Arlina, Hafil Abbas, Sarbaini Anwar, Jamsari..................453-457

87. PPE-11-O

Phenotype Measurements of Bali Cattle Combined with Interviews of Farmers from Multiple Locations in Indonesia as a Resource for Development of Breeding Programs Ann Eriksson, Endang Tri Margawati, Indriawati, Ronny Rachman Noor, Goran Andersson, Emma M Svensson.................................458-462

88. PPE-12-O Investigating the genetic status of Bali cattle in Indonesia using large scale genotyping Emma Svensson, Ann Eriksson, Ida Clemensson Lindell, Endang Tri Margawati, Rere Indriawati, Ronny Rachman Noor and GöranAndersson..............................................................................463-463

xvi

89. PPE-14-P

Genetic Variation and Phylogenetic Tree of Indonesian domestic Goat Tety Hartatik, Kustantinah, Ristianto Utomo and Lies Mira Yusiati.............................................................................464-469

90. PRP-01-O Identification of GH|Alu-I Gene Polymorphisms in Indonesian Simeulue Buffalo Eka Meutia Sari, Mohd. Agus Nashri Abdullah, Mohd. Yunus, Elmy Mariana, Eryk Andreas..................................................................470-474 91. PRP-02-O

Reproduction Performance of Bali Cow at Three Areas of Bali Province Andoyo Supriyantono.....................................................................475-479

92. PRP-03-O Blood Lipid Profile of Hypercholesterolemia Rattus norvegicus L. Fed with Sausages Containing Omega 3 and Omega 6 Fatty Acids Rio Olympias Sujarwanta, Edi Suryanto, Setiyono, Supadmo, Rusman, Jamhari, Yuny Erwanto..................................................................480-484 93. PRP-04-O The Effect of Kayu Akway (Drymis sp) Extract on The Number of Leukocyte of The Male Mice (Mus musculus L) Purwaningsih, Angelina N. Tethool................................................485-488 94. PRP-05-O In Vitro Maturation Rate of Bligon Goat Oocytes Supplemented with Gonadotrophin Diah Tri Widayati and Mulyoto Pangestu....................................489-493 95. PRP-06-P

A Preliminary Study of the Use of Hormones on the Reproductive Performance of some Breeds of Rabbits Bayu D. P. Soewandi and Yono C. Raharjo...................................494-497

96. PRP-08-P

The use of vaginal smear method based on the morphology of the vaginal mucosa epithelial cells for the dairy cows cycle estrus detection Riyanto, J., Sunarto, S. D. Widyawati and Lutojo......................498-501

97. PRP-09-P Optimization of Bovine Sperm Sexing: Modification of Column Length and Separation Time Riasari Gail Sianturi and D.A. Kusumaningrum........................502-506 The Detailed Motility and Velocity Characteristics of Rams Spermatozoa 98. PRP-10-O as Assessed by Computer-Aided Semen Analysis. Ismaya..............................................................................................507-511 99. PRP-11-O

The Effect of Trehalose Level In Tris-based Medium On Sperm Membrane Integrity of Boer Goat Semen After Cooling Nurul Isnaini, Trinil Susilawati and Luqman Hakim.................512-514

xvii

100. PRP-12-O

Reproductive Efficiency Of Filial Ongole (Po), Limousin And Simmental Crossbred Cattle At Situbondo District Kuswati, Doni sonta, Sri Wahyuningsih, Trinil Susilawati and Aulia Puspita Anugra Yekti...........................................................515-520

101. PRP-13-O

Reproductive Performances of Ongole Crossbred Cattle Using Artificial Insemination Sexed Semen with Diferrent Methods Trinil Susilawati, Lieyo Wahyudi, Nurul Isnaini and Aulia.....521-525

102. PRP-14-P

Physiology and Reproduction Responses of Crossing Beef Cows Aryogi and Y. Adinata....................................................................526-531

103. PRP-16-O

Supplementation of Cysteine on Plasma Membrane Integrity of Buck Spermatozoa Sri Wahjuningsih, Nuryadi and Achadiah Rachmawati...........532-535

Estrous Behavior in the Thoroughbred-Indonesian Local Crossbred Mares 104. PRP-17-P Muhammad Danang Eko Yulianto, Bambang Purwantara, Amrozi.............................................................................................536-540 105. PRP-19-O Preservation of Bull Cement Technology Applications without Freezing Proceed and Utilization of Epididymis as A Slaughterhouse as A Waste Product to Optimizalized Bali Cattle Artificial Insemination in Remote Areas Agung B, Mirandy S. Hermilinda P, T. Considus, Gustari S.....541-545 106. PRP-21-P

Sperm Quality of Gembrong Goat In Bali, East Java and North Sumatera After Extended With Citrate-egg Yolk, Tris-egg Yolk and Andromed® Sigit Bintara, Dyah Maharani, I Gede Suparta, Jafendi H, Sumadi, Simon Eleuser, Aron Batubara......................................................546-549

107. PRP-22-P

The Response of Gonadotropin Hormone at Different Dosage on Time of Oestrus, The Profile of Progesterone, Estrogen and Corpus Luteum of Ongole Crossed Cows Lukman Affandhy, D.M. Dikman, Y. Widyaningrum.................550-553

108. PRP-23-O Reproductive performance of Ekor Tipis and Garut ewes raised in the same condition Panjono, E. Baliarti, N. Ngadiyono, I. G. S. Budisatria, T. S. M. Widi, M. D. E. Yulianto and Sigit Bintara................................................554-556 109. PRP-24-P

Effect of Doe Blood Serum Supplementation to Buck Semen on the Head to Head Agglutination Test Hassan Ishag Haren, Mohamed Abd Elmoneim Salih, Abdel Aziz Makkawi and Hatim Idris.............................................................557-561

xviii

Agribusiness and Livestock Socioeconomics 110. SA-01-P Determinant of Intangible Benefit and Cost in Integrated Biosystem Cattle In Yogyakarta T.A Kusumastuti, S. Nurtini , R. Widiati , S.P. Syahlani, and M.A.U. Muzayyanah...............................................................562-565 111. SA-02-P

The Sustainability of Community Development in Area Pig Farming with Serasah System Based on Spiritual and Cultural Aspect Suci Paramitasari Syahlani, F. Trisakti Haryadi, and Yans Pangerungan...................................................................................566-570

112. SA-03-O

Exploration of Potential Regional Resources for Beef Cattle Farming Development in Java, Indonesia Rini Widiati, Tri Anggraeni Kusumastuti, Mujtahidah Anggriani Ummul Muzayanah........................................................................571-576

113. SA-04-O

Technical, Economic and Social Feasibilities of Beef Cattle Development in Bintuni Papua Barat Indonesia T.W. Widayati, B. Santoso, J. Woran, I.U. Warsono and J.A. Palulungan..............................................................................577-581

114. SA-05-P

Economic Analysis and the Impact of Technology IB Livestock Buffalo of Income Farmer Rusdiana S. and L. Praharani.......................................................582-585

115. SA-06-P

Economic Analysis of the Effects of Conservation Land to Provide Feed in Dry Land Farming on the Island East Helena Dasilva and Sophia Ratnawaty........................................586-595

116. SA-08-O Analysis of Champion of Milk Cluster Industry in The Province of Central Java-Indonesia Tridjoko W. Murti, Adiarto, Soedjatmogo , B. Purbaya and R. Kawuri........................................................................................596-600 117. SA-10-O

Small Scale Livestock Farmers’ Disincentives for Animal Disease Prevention and How Incentives Can Be Improved: A Case of Uganda Juliet Biira.......................................................................................601-605

118. SA-11-O Production Cost Evaluation and Effect of Lactic Acid Bacteria (Lactobacillus Plantarum) as Starter with Different Molasses Addition Zaenal Bachruddin, Mujtahidah Anggriani and Afif Fakhruddin..............................................................................606-609 119. SA-12-P

Livestock Commodities Income Contribution of Farming in the Village of Catur, Kintamani, Bangli Ida Ayu Putu Parvati and Nyoman Suyasa...................................610-614

xix

120. SA-13-O

Assessment of the Calorie-Protein Consumption Pattern among Rural and Low-Income Urban Households in Indonesia Mujtahidah Anggriani Ummul Muzayyanah, Sudi Nurtini, Suci Paramitasari Syahlani....................................................................615-618

121. SA-14-O Constraints of Value Chain in Dairy Industry in Central Java Budi Guntoro, Rochijan, Budi Prasetyo Widyobroto, Indratiningsih, Nafiatul Umami, Sudi Nurtini, and Ambar Pertiwiningrum...........................................................619-623 122. SK-02-O

The Agricultural Technology Transfer Agencies Role on Transferring the Biogas Technology to Farmers: A Study Case of Dairy Farmer’s Network Analysis in Umbulharjo Village, Yogyakarta Province, Indonesia R. Ahmad Romadhoni Surya Putra..............................................624-628

123. SK-03-O

Combined Effect of Message Framing and Endorser Credibility to Buying Interest of Yoghurt Product Tian Jihadhan, Suci Paramitasari Syahlani, F. Trisakti H..........629-633

124. SK-04-O

The Alternative Livestock and Sustainability of Farmers in Mexico Ricardo E. Caicedo Rivas, A. Moreno Oceguera, A. de M. Parra Gallegos and M. Paz Calderón Nieto.............................................634-637

125. SK-05-P Farmers’ Perception of Etawah Grade Goat Productivity Based on the Hair Color Differences I Gede Suparta Budisatria, Panjono, Dyah Maharani................638-642 126. SK-06-O Regional Development for Beef Cattle Farming based on Agricultural by Product in Serdang Bedagai District, North Sumatra Province, Indonesia Tri Hesti Wahyuni, Sya’ad Afifuddin, Ma’ruf Tafsin and Rahmanta Ginting.............................................................................................643-650 127. SK-07-O Farmers Motivation in Exerting Dairy Goats at the Slope Area of Merapi Volcano Trisakti Haryadi F., Kustantinah, Tommy Andjar C.K...............651-654 128. SK-08-O Enhancing Farmer’s Creativity in Dairy Goat Farming (A Case Study in Banyumas District) Moch. Sugiarto................................................................................655-658 129. SK-10-O

Utilization of Communication Media in the Process of Extension to Develop Farm Business at Minahasa District North Sulawesi Province Anneke K. Rintjap, Jolanda K.J. Kalangi, Maasye T. Massie.....659-663

130. SK-11-O

The Influence of Dairy Farming Motivation on Dairy Cows Productivity in Different Disaster Prone Areas of Merapi Volcano S. Andarwati, F. Trisakti Haryadi, B. Guntoro, E. Sulastri.......664-667

xx

131. SK-12-P

Potential and Opportunities of Livestock Development in 24 Locations PSDSK Assistance of BPTP Support for Food Security Titim Rahmawati and Yoshi Tri Sulistyaningsih.........................668-672

Cattle Farmer’s Characteristics In West Timor (Case Study on Nekmese 132. SK-13-O Farmers Group, Usapinonot, North Central Timor, Nusa Tenggara Timur) Paulus Klau Tahuk., Endang Baliarti., Subur Priyono Sasmito Budhi and Panjono......................................................................................673-677 133. SK-15-P

Estimation of the Peranakan Ongole Cattle Output in Klirong, Kebumen, Central of Java Sumadi, N. Ngadiyono, C. T. Noviandi, D. T. Widayati................678-682

Animal Products Technology 134. TD-01-O

Effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa and Schleichera oleosa Liquid Smoke on Lipid Content, Lipid Oxidation and Residual Nitrite in Se’i (Rotenese Smoked Beef) Gemini E.M. Malelak, I.G.N. Jelantik, Maria R. Denoratu, Geertruida M Sipahelut, I.G.N. Jelantik.......................................683-687

135. TD-02-O Chemical Composition and Antioxidative Potential of Chicken Sausage with Substitution of Tempe Jamhari, Yuny Erwanto, Listia Kusumasari Nurhanifah............688-692 In Vitro Antioxidant Activity of Beef Lung Protein Hydrolysates 136. TD-04-O Khothibul Umam Al Awwaly, Suharjono Triatmojo, Wayan T. Artama, Yuny Erwanto..................................................................................693-693



137. TD-05-O

Carcass Production and Chevon Quality of Kacang Buck Reared Traditionally in Grobogan, Central Java, Indonesia Retno Adiwinarti, I Gede Suparta Budisatria, Kustantinah, Rusman............................................................................................694-698

138. TD-06-O

Fraud Identification in Meatballs Product Using Porcine Detection KIT and Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Methods Tridjoko Murti, Christina Admantin, Umar Santoso, Dyah Widiasih, Aris Haryanto..................................................................................699-703

139. TD-07-O

Identification of Dog Meat Species by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Dyah Ayu Widiasih, Cynthia Debbi Ratnasari, Yatri Drastini, Tridjoko Wisnu Murti........................................................................... 704-708





140. TD-08-O

Study on the Physico-Chemical Characteristics and Microstructure of Meat from Goat Given Ration Papaya Leaves (Carica papaya L.) Muh. Ichsan Haris, Soeparno, Umar Santoso, Rusman........... 709-713

xxi

141. TD-09-O

The Effect of Acetic Acid Concentration and Curing Time on the Characteristics of Native Chicken Legs Skin Gelatin Meity Sompie, S. E. Siswosubroto and J. H. W Pontoh............714-718

142. TST-02-O

Antibacterial Activity of Fermented Milk Cultured with Yeast-LAB and Added Sweet Corn Against Pathogenic Bacteria Yurliasni, Yusdar Zakaria, Zuraida Hanum and Sitti Wajizah......719-723

143. TST-03-P Effect of Storage Period Eggs on Egg Quality Characteristics Naked Neck Chicken Tatan Kostaman and Soni Sopiyana.............................................724-728 144. TST-04-O Study The Quality of Multi Probiotic Fermented Milk Made from Cow’s Milk and Goat’s Milk Eni Robiyati, Tridjoko Wisnu Murti, Harisuddin Lutfan Jundi, Fajar Ramadhan........................................................................................729-732 145. TST-05-O Development of Halal Goat Cheese using Rennet Like from Vegetable Source as Replace to Those of Commercial Rennet Source Widitya Tri Nugraha, Tridjoko Wisnu Murti, Irma Sri Novitasari, Tri Kartika Sari , Gangga Murcita, Gregorius Riswan Timur Wijakangka.....................................................................................733-737 146. TST-06-O The Characteristics of Salted Chicken and Duck Egg by using Traditional Roasting Nurliyani, Anggi Hartawan, Yulianto Adi Nugroho, Indratiningsih..................................................................................738-742 147. TST-07-O

Capability of Isolates Probiotic Bacteria, Isolated From Spontaneous Fermented goat Milk as Starter In milk Fermentation Afriza Yelnetty, Purwadi, Arie Mirah........................................... 743-743

148. TST-09-O Changes in physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of concentrated yogurt made from goat milk during storage Juni Sumarmono, Mardiati Sulistyowati, and Triana................744-748 Waste and Environmental Issues Development of New Biostarter Medium Using Local Raw Materials for 149. TLL-01-O Composting of Elephant Feces Nanung Agus Fitriyanto, Suharjono Triatmojo, Tri Sunu Dane Wibawa............................................................................................749-753 150. TLL-02-P

Implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices System in Halal Certified Chicken Slaughterhouses in Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta Edi Suryanto, Tridjoko Wisnu Murti, Yatri Drastini, Rusman, Bastoni, Umar Al Faruqi and Ismatullah Salim..........................................754-760

xxii

151. TLL-03-O The Influence of Tanning Material Difference on the Physical Quality of the Skin of Puffer Fish (Arothon reticularis) RLM. Satrio Ari Wibowo, Titik Anggraini, Ambar Pertiwininggrum...............................................................................761-765 152. TLL-04-P

The Effect of Composting Liquid Organic Fertilizer Processing Residues on Compost Quality Eulis Tanti Marlina, Yuli Astuti Hidayati, Tb. Benito A. Kurnani....................................................................766-769

Utilization of Bee Nest Waste as a Natural Disinfectant on Hatching Eggs 153. TLL-05-P Poultry Ellin Harlia, Andriyanto, Eulis Tanti Marlina, Denny Suryanto...............................................................................770-773 154. TLL-06-P Quality Vermicompost (Content N, P, K) From Beef Cattle Waste Treatment Through Integrated Yuli Astuti Hidayati, Sudiarto, and Wowon Juanda.....................774-777 155. TLL-08-O The Application of Secang Natural Dye on Sheep Leather Crust Suede Using Ikat Jumputan Method Entin Darmawati, Suharjono Triatmojo and Diana Ross Arief......................................................................778-784 156. TLL-09-O New Technique to Detect Pig Hair by Immunochromatographic Rapid Test Yatri Drastini, Sumantri, Christina Yuni Admantin, Tridjoko Wisnu Murti.....................................................................785-788 157. TLL-10-O Isoptericola sp. A10-1, Chitinase Producing Actinobacterium Isolated from Indonesian Tropical Shrimp Pond Waste Water Amrih Prasetyo, Lies Mira Yusiati, Yuny Erwanto, Wihandoyo, Nanung Agus Fitriyanto, Tomoyuki Nakagawa and Takashi Hayakawa.........................................................................................789-792 Production and Application of Keratinase Enzyme of Bacillus spp. Isolate 158. TLL-11-O by Using Raw Feather as Substrate Theresia Galuh Wandita, Nanung Agus Fitriyanto, Suharjono Triatmojo.........................................................................................793-797 159. TLL-12-O Different Effect on the Quality of Organic Fertilizer Fermentor of Ongole Crossbred Cattle’s Feces Dedes Amertaningtyas, Trinil Susilawati and Lilik Eka Radiati.............................................................................798-802 160.

TLL-13-P

Implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices System in Halal Certified Cattle Slaughterhouses in Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta Bastoni, Nasrul Hidayat, Edi Suryanto, Rusman, Tridjoko Wisnu Murti, Yatri Drastini ...................................................................... 803-809 xxiii

The 6th International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production Integrated Approach in Developing Sustainable Tropical Animal Production October 20-22, 2015, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

The Use of Ramie By-Product (Boehmeria nivea) Materials as Complete Feed on the Growth and Hematology of Weaning Ettawa Cross Breed Goat Emmy Susanti*, Ali Agus, Y. Y. Suranindyah, and F. M. Suhartati *Faculty of Animal Science, Jenderal Soedirman University, Purwokerto, 53123 *E-mail: [email protected] ABSTRACT: This study aims to determine the effect of complete feed using ramie with or without ensilage and vegetable or animal sources of protein towards the growth and blood hematology of weaning Ettawa cross breed goat. The study used a 2X2 factorial design and 6 (six) replicates. The complete feed treatment using ramie by-product without ensilage showed that almost all parameters of growth was higher than the ensilaged one (P<0.05) except height. Complete feed treatment using ramie by-product with an additional source of animal protein indicates the final weight and daily weight gain (PBBH) was higher (P<0.01). The interaction of both treatments was proved the final weight, daily weight gain, and chest circumference. The complete feed treatment using ramie without and with ensilage, the addition of a source of protein and the interaction of both treatments had no effect on the blood hematology. The study could be concluded the weaning Ettawa cross breed goat that received complete feed using ramie waste without ensilage showed higher growth while the addition of animal protein sources are higher. Keywords: Blood hematology, Ensilage, Growth, Protein Source, Ramie. INTRODUCTION Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L Goud) is a shrub that produces fibers in the bark. Its fiber production is approximately 3 to 5% of forage production and the rest is forage by product. Ramie leaves can be used as a substitute for forage legume since its rude protein content was 22% (Saroso, 2000). It was reported that it has shortage of amino acids methionine, mineral phosphor (P) and cuprum (Cu) (Duarte et al., 1997). Methionine is an essential amino acid, while mineral P plays a role in energy metabolism and Cu is a micro mineral in the transport of oxygen. The straw from decortications residue which has crude fiber (CF) as high as 37.81% can be used as a source of fiber (energy) for ruminant. Production and nutritional feed quality of ramie by product was maximized as complete feed constituent and being formulated with vegetable or animal sources of protein, a source of energy, vitamins and mineral. Complete feeds with different protein sources experiencing ensilage that those without ensilage. Ensilage in complete feed is the simplest method of improving its quality for long-term storage (Wongnen et al., 2009), and increase the digestibility of dry matter (DM), organic matter (BO), crude fiber (CF) as well as non-structural carbohydrate (Vasupen et al., 2005; 2006) due to the growth of lactic acid bacteria. Complete feed was given to after weaning Ettawa cross breed goat in order to identify its influence as animal feed by measuring growth and blood hematology. MATERIAL AND METHODS Complete feed consists of ramie by-product (stalks and leaves), dried cassava, cassava, rice bran, pollard, crushed soybeans, soybean meal, fish meal, molasses, urea, salt, calcium, and mineral mix. Ration composition and nutrient are presented in Table 1. Twenty after weaning Ettawa cross breed goats (age 3 to 4 months) and 24 units of individual housing are equipped with eat and drink container. The chemicals and analysis was equipment BK, BO, CP, NDF, and ADF. Weighing capacity of 200 g and 20 kg. The method used was experimental in vivo, the basic design of completely randomized design (CRD) 2X2 factorial and 6 (six) replicates (Steel and Torrie, 316

The 6th International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production Integrated Approach in Developing Sustainable Tropical Animal Production October 20-22, 2015, Yogyakarta, Indonesia 1993) The first factor is a complete feed without ensilage (CF0) or with ensilage (CF1), while the second factor is a source of vegetable protein (N) or animal (H). The four kinds of treatment are: 1) CF0N is complete feed without ensilage and source of vegetable protein, 2) CF0H is complete feed without ensilage and sources of animal protein, 3) CF1N is complete feed with ensilage and source of vegetable protein, 4) CF1H is complete feed with ensilage and diverse sources of animal protein. Difference analysis was following the procedure of general linear models (GLM) in the SAS program version 6.12 (SAS, 1996) and a further test of Honestly Significant Different (Gill, 1978). Growth parameters variables measured were as follows: final body weight, daily weight gain (PBBH), height, body length, chest circumference, and the circumference of the pelvis (Hardjosubroto and Astuti, 1993) and hematological blood (glucose, erythrocytes, leukocytes, hemoglobin, and PCV). Table 1. Complete feed formulation and nutrient composition Ingredient

CF0N 13.5 16.5 10 10 9.4 9 10.5 8.8 10 0.3 0.5 0.5 1 100

Proportion (%) CF1N CF0H 13.5 13.5 16.5 16.5 10 10 10 10 9.4 14.95 9 9 10.5 8.8 13.75 10 10 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 1 100 100

CF1H 13.5 16.5 10 10 14.95 9 13.75 10 0.3 0.5 0.5 1 100

Ramie leaves Ramie stalk Dried cassava Cassava Rice bran Pollard Soybean meal Crushed soybeans Fish meal Molases Urea Salt Calcium Mineral+Vitamin Total Chemical composition* Ash ( % BK) 10.42 9.50 13.53 11.25 Extract ether ( % BK) 1.93 2.51 3.31 3.42 Crude fiber ( % BK) 19.59 13.46 19.91 15.65 BETN ( % BK) 48.18 52.99 41.12 49.62 1 Crude protein ( % BK) 19.88 21.54 22.13 20.07 1 TDN ( % BK) 70.01 70.01 65.74 65.74 * ) Calculation based on table (Hartadi et al., 2005) and analysis result of Animal Feed Laboratory, 1 ) Nutrition need of after weaning Ettawa cross breed goat is PK 12.70% and TDN 64.81% (Ranjhan, 1981). Sequences of Work 1. Prepare 24 after weaning Ettawa cross breed goat and weighing and worm medication and vitamins. Goats are placed in individual cages. 317

The 6th International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production Integrated Approach in Developing Sustainable Tropical Animal Production October 20-22, 2015, Yogyakarta, Indonesia 2. Raising begins with a stage adaptation for 14 days and feeding as much as 3.5% of its weight at 06.30 pm and 15.00 pm and drinking water and labium. Raising is carried out for four months. 3. Complete feed using ramie by-product with ensilage (Table 1) then conduct the ensilage process an-aerobically for 21 days at room temperature. Complete feeds using ramie by-product without ensilage was prepared every day with the composition as in Table 1 with the leaves and stems of ramie was in the form of air-dried. 4. Individual weighing was conducted every two weeks (after the preliminary stage) and measured the size of the body to determine the weight and daily weight gain before feeding in the morning. Blood sampling was conducted for hematology test. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION The treatment using a complete feed of ramie by-product with and without ensilage and source of vegetable and animal protein on the growth of after weaning Ettawa cross breed goat is presented in Table 2. 1ed using ramie without by-product and with ensilage and vegetable and animal protein sources Parameter Final body weight (kg BB 0.75)

Protein source CF0 CF1 Interaction ac bc N 9.51±0.68 8.66±0.20 s ad bd H 10.19±0.23 8.72±0.33 Daily weight gain (g/kg BB0.75) 77.97±11.89ac 42.37±3.22bc N s ad bd 108.66±22.06 51.02±4.86 H Height (cm) 62.80±1.60 63.00±3.29 N ns 62.80±2.93 61.00±1.90 H a Body length (cm) 55.78±1.37 51.40±3.20b N ns 56.00±1.09a 51.83±1.72b H Chest circumference (cm) 61.00±1.55a 60.20±2.31b N s a b 63.00±1.67 58.20±2.99 H a Pelvis Circumference (cm) 62.00±1.67 58.60±3.98b N ns a b 66.40±2.15 59.00±4.43 H ab Description: : different superscript in the same row/column showed significant differences (P<0.05). cd: different superscript in the same row/column showed highly significant differences (P<0.01). CF0: complete feed ramie by-product e without ensilage; CF1: complete feed using ramie byproduct with ensilage N: source of vegetable protein; H: source of animal protein. Final Weight and Daily Weight Gain (PBBH) After weaning Ettawa cross breed goat who get complete feed using ramie by-product without ensilage showed final body weight of 9.76±0.55 kg BW0.75 (20.87±0.45 kg; CF0N) and 9.93±1.73 kg BW0.75 (21.50±2.08 kg; CF0H) higher than the complete feed with ensilage of 9.93±1.73 kg BW0.75 (18.30±2.08 kg; CF1N) and 8.76±0.59 kg BW0.75 (18.07±0.49 kg; CF1H) (P<0.05). Final weight of after weaning Ettawa cross breed goat achieved as a result of weight gain daily (PBBH) with a positive average value 77.97 g/kg BB0.75/day (CF0N) dan108.66 g/kg BW0.75/day (CF0H). 42.37 g/kg BB0.75/day (147.71 g/day) (CF1N) and 51.02 g/kg BW0.75/ day (189.23 g/day) (CF1H) (P<0.05). Weight gain was consistent with the consumption of BK. OM and NDF and were higher in animals that received complete feed without ensilage (P<0.01) (Susanti and Suhartati, 2015). It shows the total consumption intake to supports livestock growth and productivity. Final body weight in this study was higher than the study results of Musnandar 318

The 6th International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production Integrated Approach in Developing Sustainable Tropical Animal Production October 20-22, 2015, Yogyakarta, Indonesia et al. (2011). The goat who received rations of grass substitution with fermented palm bunches of 0%, 50% and 100% produced the final weight of 16.68 kg; 18.07 kg and 18.5 kg). Achievement of the final weight of the treatment showed that complete feed can provide energy and protein for the after weaning Ettawa cross breed goat and indicated real interaction of both treatments. Growth period is the period that require nutrient intake of energy and protein sources in sufficient amounts as provided in the rations, larger than the recommended requirements of Ranjahn et al. (1981) for after weaning Ettawa cross breed goat. Height, Body Length. Chest Circumference, and Pelvis Circumference After weaning Ettawa cross breed goat who received complete feed using ramie by-product without and with ensilage showed no significant difference of body length of 62.80±1.60 cm on CF0N; 62.80±2.93 cm on CF0H; 63.00±3.29 cm in CF1N, and 61.00±1.90 cm on CF1H. The average size of goat body length who received complete feed using ramie by-product without ensilage was 55.78±1.37 cm (CF0N) and 56.00±1.10 cm (CF0H), longer than those who got complete feed with ensilage of 51.40±3.20 cm (CF1N) and 51.83±1.72 cm (CF1H) (P<0.01). After weaning Ettawa cross breed goats’ body length (less than one year) was 49.4±7.8 cm (Kurnianto et al., 2013). Body weight is a reflection of livestock (Cam et al., 2010). The size of chest circumference of after weaning Ettawa cross breed goat who got complete feed using ramie by-product without ensilage was 61.00±1.55cm (CF0N) and 63.00±1.67 cm (CF0H), greater than those who received complete feed with ensilage of 60.20±2.31 cm (CF1N) and 58.20±2.99 cm (CF1H) (P<0.01). The development of chest circumference size was according to goat consumption that received complete feed of ramie by-product of BK. BO and NDF that were respectively higher than complete feed without ensilage. Treatment of different protein sources showed the same response in body length and chest circumference. The effect of complete feed using ramie by product without ensilage on the size of the pelvis circumference was 62.00±1.67 cm (CF0N) and 66.40±2.15 cm (CF0H), higher than those who received complete feed silage of 58.60±3.98 cm (CF1N) and 59.00±4.43 cm (CF1H) (P<0.01). Blood Hematology The distribution of complete feed using ramie by-product with and without ensilage and the use of vegetable and animal protein source at weaning goat against hematological blood condition is presented in Table 3. Table 3. Condition blood hematology of after weaning Ettawa cross breed goat who received complete feed of ramie by-product with and without ensilage and different protein sources Parameter Glucose

Protein source CF0 CF1 Interaction 46.67±8.07 46.17±4.83 N ns 46.83±10.68 45.67±7.92 H Erythrocytes (X106/uL) 2.39±0.34 2.07±0.51 N ns 2.15±0.34 1.94±0.39 H Leukocytes (X103/uL) 19.82±5.39 19.48±3.28 N ns 21.15±3.65 17.02±3.34 H Hemoglobyn (g/dL) 9.77±0.64 9.15±1.29 N ns 9.38±0.95 8.80±1.34 H PCV (%) 26.00±5.19 23.63±6.11 N ns 23.37±4.55 21.90±6.10 H Description: CF0: complete feed using ramie by-product without ensilage; CF1: complete feed using ramie by-product with ensilage N: complete feed using ramie by-product with vegetable protein sources; H: complete feed using ramie by product with the source of animal protein. 319

The 6th International Seminar on Tropical Animal Production Integrated Approach in Developing Sustainable Tropical Animal Production October 20-22, 2015, Yogyakarta, Indonesia Complete feeds using ramie by-product with and without ensilage had no effect on blood hematology of blood glucose; erythrocytes; leukocytes; hemoglobin and PCV. Barbari goat that got the complete feed block consisted of grass hay: concentrate of 60:40 (T1). While mustard cake in concentrate amounted to 15% (T2) and 30% (T3) that was replaced with leucaena leaves flour showed the blood glucose concentration of 53.59±0.85 mg/dl; 53.67±1.05 mg/dl and 53.80±0.95 mg/dl (P>0.05) (Samanta et al., 2003). Kramer (2000) reported the condition of normal blood hematology of goats was: erythrocytes 6 to 19 X106/uL; leukocyte 4 to 13X103/uL; hemoglobin 8 to 12 g/dL; and PCV 22 to 38%. The number of erythrocytes of weaning Ettawa cross breed goats who received complete feed using ramie by-product with both treatments was lower than Kramer guidance (2000). It was suspected that weaning Ettawa cross breed goats showed symptoms of anemia. Leukocyte counted higher than the Kramers’ recommendation (2000). They were showing infection. Nutrition in complete feed using ramie by-product with vegetable or animal protein source is also had no real effect on blood hematology. Interaction of the two treatments on after weaning Ettawa cross breed goats hematological blood is not significantly different. CONCLUSION The weaning Ettawa cross breed goats that received complete feed using ramie by-product with ensilage shows lower growth, while complete feed using ramie by-product with source of vegetable protein has low nutrition than animal protein source. REFERENCES Duarte, A.D., V.C. Sgarberi and R.B. Junior. 1997. Composition and Nutritive Value of Ramie Leaf Flour for Monogastric Animals. Reviata PAB: 32 (12). http://webnotes.sct. embrapa.br/pab/pab.nsf/1369aa7a4f8bbb9d03256508004f4e1d/d59fc 8d31a8cf5dc032565730060cd62/$FILE/Pab05296.doc. Diunduh tanggal 10/1/2010. Gill, J.L. 1978. Design and Analysis Experiment in the Animals and Medical Sciences. Vol. 2. The Iowa State University of Florida, USA. Hartadi, H., S. Reksohadiprodjo dan A.D. Tillman. 2005. Tabel Komposisi Pakan untuk Indonesia. Gajah Mada University Press. Yogyakarta. Ranjhan, S.K. 1981. Animal Nutrition in the Tropics. 2nd Revised Edition. Vikas Publishing House PVT. LTD. New Delhi. SAS. 1996. SAS/STAT user’s guide (Release 6.12). SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC. Steel, R.G.D. dan J.H. Torrie. 1993. Principles and Procedures of Statistics. Mc Graw-Hill Book Co. Inc. Pub. Ltd. London. Susanti, E. dan F.M. Suhartati. 2015. Pemanfaatan Limbah Rami (Boehmeria nivea) sebagai Bahan Complete Feed terhadap Konsumsi dan Kecernaan in Vivo pada Kambing PE Lepas Sapih. Buletin Peternakan. In Press. Van Soest, P.J. 1982. Nutritional Ecology of the Ruminant. O and B. Book Inc. Corvallis Oregon. USA. Vasupen, K., C. Yuangklang, S. Witayakun and Srinanuan. 2005. Effect of Difference Moisture on Quality of Fermented Total Mixed Ration. In: Proceeding of the Technical Conference of 43th Kasetsart University, Bangkok. Vasupen, K., C. Yuangklang, C. Sarnklong, S. Wongsuthavas, J. Matchaothai and P. Srenanul. 2006. Effects of total mixed ration and fermented total mixed ration on voluntary feed intake, digestion nutrition digestibility and milk production in lactating dairy cows. In: Proceedings of the Technical Conference of 44th. KasetsartUniversity, Bangkok. Wongnen, C., C. Wachirapakorn, C. Patipan, D. Panpong, K. Kongweha, N. Namsaen, P. Gunun and C. Yuangklang. 2009. Effects of Fermented Total Mixed Rration and Cracked Cottonseed on Milk Yield and Milk Composition in Dairy Cows. Asian-Aust. J. Anim. Sci. 22: 16251632.

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Emmy Susanti ORAL PRESENTER