Introduction to Fuzzy Logic

• In 1974 Mamdani and Assilian used fuzzy logic to ... Fuzzy set represents the “ambient” temperature and A B ˜ A˜ Fuzzy set the “near optimum” pressu...

3 downloads 177 Views 1MB Size
Introduction to Fuzzy Logic Introduction to Fuzzy Logic

Motivation • The The term  term “fuzzy fuzzy logic logic” refers to a logic of  refers to a logic of approximation.  g y • Boolean logic assumes that every fact is either  entirely true or false.  y g y g g • Fuzzy logic allows for varying degrees of truth.  • Computers can apply this logic to represent vague  and imprecise ideas, such as “hot”, “tall” or “old”.

Conception of Fuzzy Logic Conception of Fuzzy Logic • Many Many decision decision‐making making and problem and problem‐solving solving  tasks are too complex to be defined precisely • however, people succeed by using imprecise  knowledge • Fuzzy Fuzzy logic resembles human reasoning in its  logic resembles human reasoning in its use of approximate information and  uncertainty to generate decisions. uncertainty to generate decisions. 



Full glass Full glass 

• Empty glass Empty glass

• Almost full glass Almost full glass

• Almost empty glass Almost empty glass

Spot the old person(s) on this slide Spot the old person(s) on this slide

Fuzzy Logic Fuzzy Logic • An An approach to uncertainty that combines real  approach to uncertainty that combines real values [0…1] and logic operations • Fuzzy logic is based on the ideas of fuzzy set  theory and fuzzy set membership often found  h df b hi f f d in natural (e.g., spoken) language.

Fuzzy Variable:  Old

1

0

40

60

80

90

Age Every person is given a degree of membership between 0 and 1 to  p indicate how OLD the person is.

History • Plato Plato laid a foundation for what would become fuzzy  laid a foundation for what would become fuzzy logic, indicating that there was a third region  (beyond True and False) where these opposites  “tumbled about.” • The modern philosophers, Hegel, Marx, and Engels,  echoed this sentiment.

History • In In the early 1900 the early 1900’s, s, Lukasiewicz Lukasiewicz described a three described a three‐ valued logic. The third value can be translated as the  term “possible,” and he assigned it a numeric value  between True and False.  • Later, he explored four‐valued logics, five‐valued  logics, and declared that in principle there was  nothing to prevent the derivation of an infinite‐ h h d f f valued logic. 

History • Lotfi Zadeh, at the University of California at Berkeley,  , y y, first presented fuzzy logic in the mid‐1960's.  • Zadeh developed fuzzy logic as a way of processing data.  Instead of requiring a data element to be either a Instead of requiring a data element to be either a  member or non‐member of a set, he introduced the idea  of partial set membership.  • In 1974 Mamdani and Assilian used fuzzy logic to  regulate a steam engine.  • In 1985 researchers at Bell laboratories developed the  In 1985 researchers at Bell laboratories developed the first fuzzy logic chip. 

History • Lotfi Zadeh, at the University of California at Berkeley,  , y y, first presented fuzzy logic in the mid‐1960's.  • Zadeh developed fuzzy logic as a way of processing data.  Instead of requiring a data element to be either a Instead of requiring a data element to be either a  member or non‐member of a set, he introduced the idea  of partial set membership.  • In 1974 Mamdani and Assilian used fuzzy logic to  regulate a steam engine.  • In 1985 researchers at Bell laboratories developed the  In 1985 researchers at Bell laboratories developed the first fuzzy logic chip. 

Precision and Significance Precision and Significance

Eliminate the Vague? Eliminate the Vague? • It might be argued that vagueness is an obstacle to clarity  g g g y of meaning. • But there does seem to be a loss of expressiveness when  statements like “Dan statements like,  Dan is balding is balding” are eliminated from the  are eliminated from the language. • This is what happens when natural language is translated  into classic logic. The loss is not severe for accounting  programs or computational mathematics programs, but  will appear when the programming task turns to issues of will appear when the programming task turns to issues of  queries and knowledge.

Experts are Vague Experts are Vague • To design an expert system a major task is to codify the  o des g a e pe sys e a ajo as s o cod y e expert’s decision‐making process.  • In a domain there may be precise, scientific tests and  measurements that are used in a “fuzzy”, intuitive  manner to evaluate results, symptoms, relationships,  causes or remedies causes, or remedies. • While some of the decisions and calculations could be  done using traditional logic, fuzzy systems afford a  g g , y y broader, richer field of data and manipulations than do  more traditional methods.

Introduce Fuzziness Introduce Fuzziness • Fuzzy logic extends Boolean logic to handle the  y g g expression of vague concepts. • To express imprecision quantitatively, a set membership  function maps elements to real values between zero and function maps elements to real values between zero and  one (inclusive). The value indicates the “degree” to which  an element belongs to a set.  • A fuzzy logic representation for the “hotness” of a room,  would assign100°F a membership value of one and  25°FF a membership value of zero. 75 25 a membership value of zero 75°FF would have a  would have a membership value between zero and one.

Bivalence and Fuzz Bivalence and Fuzz

Fuzzy Is Not Probability Fuzzy Is Not Probability • Fuzzy Fuzzy systems and probability operate over the same  systems and probability operate over the same numeric range.  • The probabilistic approach yields the natural‐ p pp y language statement, “There is an 80% chance that  Dan is balding.” • The fuzzy terminology corresponds to “Dan's degree  of membership within the set of balding people is  0.80.”

Fuzzy Is Not Probability Fuzzy Is Not Probability • The probability view assumes that Dan is or is not  p y balding (the Law of the Excluded Middle) and that  we only have an 80% chance of knowing which set  he is in he is in.  • Fuzzy supposes that Dan is “more or less” balding,  corresponding to the value of 0.80. corresponding to the value of 0.80.  • Confidence factors also assume that Dan is or is not  balding. The confidence factor simply indicates how  confident, how sure, one is that he is in one or the  other group.

Introduction • Application areas Application areas – Fuzzy Control • • • • • •

Subway trains Subway trains Cement kilns Washing Machines g Fridges Cameras Boiler control

22

Sets and Fuzzy Sets Sets and Fuzzy Sets Fuzzy sets Fuzzy sets – admits gradation such as all tones between  admits gradation such as all tones between black and white.  A fuzzy set has a graphical description  that expresses how the transition from one to another  takes place.  This graphical description is called a  membership function.

Fuzzy Sets (figure from Klir &Yuan) Fuzzy Sets  (figure from Klir &Yuan)

Membership functions  (figure from Klir &Yuan)

Fuzzy set (figure from Earl Cox) Fuzzy set  (figure from Earl Cox)

Crisp Logic vs Fuzzy Logic

• Crisp logic needs hard decisions • Fuzzy Logic deals with “membership in group” functions

Example: Fuzzy Short Example: Fuzzy Short • Short(x) = {0 if x >= 1.9m ,  Short(x) = {0 if x >= 1 9m – 1 if x <= 1.7m  – else ( 1.9 ‐ l ( 1 9 x ) / 0.2 }  )/02}

28

Membership function • Crisp set representation •

Characteristic function

f A ( x ) : X → 0,1

⎧1, if x ∈ A f A ( x) = ⎨ ⎩0 if x ∉ A

• Fuzzy set representation • Membership function M b hi f ti •

μ A ( x) = 1 if x is totally in A μ A ( x) = 0 if x is not in A 0 < μ A ( x) < 1If x is partly in A           

Fuzzy Set Operators Fuzzy Set Operators • Fuzzy Set: Fuzzy Set: – Union – Intersection – Complement

• Many possible definitions – we introduce one possibility

30

Fuzzy Set Union Fuzzy Set Union • Union ( f Union ( fA(x) and f (x) and fB(x) ) =  (x) ) = – max (fA(x) , fB(x) ) 

• Union ( Tall(x) and Short(x) ) U i ( ll( ) d Sh ( ) )

31

Fuzzy Set Intersection Fuzzy Set Intersection • Intersection ( f Intersection ( fA(x) and f (x) and fB(x) ) =  (x) ) = – min (fA(x) , fB(x) ) 

• Intersection ( Tall(x) and Short(x) ) I i ( ll( ) d Sh ( ) )

32

Fuzzy Set Complement Fuzzy Set Complement • Complement( f Complement( fA(x) ) = 1  (x) ) = 1 ‐ fA(x) • Not ( Tall(x) ) 

33

Fuzzy Logic Operators Fuzzy Logic Operators • Fuzzy Logic: Fuzzy Logic: – NOT (A) = 1 ‐ A – A AND B = min( A, B) A AND B = min( A B) – A OR B = max( A, B)

34

Fuzzy Logic NOT Fuzzy Logic NOT

35

Fuzzy Logic AND Fuzzy Logic AND

36

Fuzzy Logic OR Fuzzy Logic OR

37

Fuzzy Inference Systems • • • • • •

Fuzzy logical operations Fuzzy rules Fuzzification p Implication Aggregation Defuzzification Fuzzifier

Inference Engine Inference Engine

De‐fuzzification output

input

Fuzzy Knowledge base

Fuzzy rule as a relation • if x is A then y is B “xx is A is A”, “yy is B is B” – fuzzy predicates A(x), B(y) fuzzy predicates A(x) B(y) • if A(x) then B(y) can be represented as a relation can be represented as a relation   R(x,y): A(x) ® B(y) where R(x,y) can be considered a fuzzy set with 2‐dimentional  membership function

μR ( x, y) = f (μ A ( x), ) μB ( y)) where f is fuzzy implication function where f is fuzzy implication function

Fuzzifier • Converts the crisp input p p to a linguistic variable g using the  g membership functions stored in the fuzzy knowledge base.

Example for Fuzzy rules Example for Fuzzy rules • For For a washing machine, the speed of rotation  a washing machine the speed of rotation should be based on  • the quantity of clothes and  the quantity of clothes and • the softness of the clothes

Washing Machine INPUTS:   Laundry Quantity (Fuzzy) Laundry softness (Fuzzy) Laundry softness (Fuzzy) OUTPUT: Washing cycle types (Fuzzy) We need rules connecting these  variables

Washing Machine ‐ rule 1 Washing Machine  rule 1 If Laundry quantity is large (Fuzzy) then wash cycle is strong (Fuzzy) Washing machine needs a NON‐fuzzy information. .

Small

Medium

Large

Light

Normal

1 0.6 0.3

0 Laundry Quantity

Wash Cycle

Strong

Step 4: Defuzzification Step 4: Defuzzification Step 4:  The last step in the fuzzy inference process is  The last step in the fuzzy inference process is defuzzification defuzzification.   .   Fuzziness helps us to evaluate the rules, but the final output of a  Fuzziness helps us to evaluate the rules, but the final output of a  fuzzy system has to be a crisp number.   y y p The input for the defuzzification The input for the  defuzzification process is the aggregate output  fuzzy fuzzy set and the output is a single number. set and the output is a single number

„ „ „

There are several defuzzification methods, but probably the  There are several defuzzification most popular one is the  most popular one is the centroid t l i th centroid t id technique t h i technique.   .   It finds the point where a vertical line would slice the aggregate  It  finds the point where a vertical line would slice the aggregate  set set into two equal masses.   to t o equa asses Mathematically this  Mathematically  this centre of gravity (COG) centre of gravity (COG) can be expressed as:

b

COG =

d ∫ μ A ( x ) x dx a b

∫ μ A ( x ) dx a

Washing Machine 2 rules Washing Machine – 2 rules Rule 1: If Laundry quantity is LARGE and Laundry softness is HARD then wash  cycle is strong. Rule 2: If Laundry quantity is MEDIUM and Laundry softness is NOT SO HARD then wash cycle is normal.

Laundry Softness Laundry Softness Hard

1

N.H

N.S

Laundry Quantity Laundry Quantity Soft

Small

1

.75

0.6

02 0.2

0.3

0

0

Medium

Large

Wash Cycle Wash Cycle Light

Normal

Strong

Inference Engine Inference Engine • Using If‐Then type fuzzy rules g yp y converts the fuzzy input to the  y p fuzzy output.

Fuzzy Relations Fuzzy Relations

Fuzzy Relations Fuzzy Relations • Generalizes classical relation into one that  allows partial membership – Describes a relationship that holds between  two or more objects • Example: a fuzzy relation “Friend” describe the  degree of friendship between two person (in  contrast to either being friend or not being friend in  classical relation!)

Fuzzy Logic:Intelligence, Control, and Information, J. Yen and R. Langari, PrenticeHall 

Fuzzy Relations Fuzzy Relations •



A fuzzy relation        is a mapping from the  R˜ Cartesian space X x Y to the interval [0,1], where  the strength of the mapping is expressed by the the strength of the mapping is expressed by the  membership function of the relation μ (x,y) The “strength” of the relation between ordered  pairs of the two universes is measured with a pairs of the two universes is measured with a  membership function expressing various “degree”  R˜ of strength [0,1]

Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications: Timothy J. Ross, McGraw‐Hill

Fuzzy Cartesian Product Fuzzy Cartesian Product Let

A˜ be a fuzzy set on universe X, and  b f i h B˜ be a fuzzy set on universe Y, then

A˜ × B˜ = R˜ ⊂ X × Y Where the fuzzy relation R has membership function

μR˜ ((x,, y) = μ A˜ xB˜ ((x,, y) = min((μ A˜ ((x), ), μ B˜ (y))

Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications: Timothy J. Ross, McGraw‐Hill

Fuzzy Cartesian Product: Example Fuzzy Cartesian Product: Example Let

A˜ B˜

defined on a universe of three discrete temperatures, X = {x1,x2,x3}, and

defined on a universe of two discrete pressures, Y = {y1,y2} Fuzzy set        represents the “ambient” temperature and y p A˜ p Fuzzy set        the “near optimum” pressure for a certain heat exchanger , and  B˜ the Cartesian product might represent the conditions (temperature‐pressure  pairs) of the exchanger that are associated with “efficient” operations.    For  example, let

0.2 0.5 1 A˜ = + + x1 x 2 x3 and

0.3 0.9 B˜ = + y1 y2

}

y1 x1 ⎡ 0.2 A˜ × B˜ = R˜ = x 2 ⎢ 0.3 x 3 ⎢⎣ 0.3

Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications: Timothy J. Ross, McGraw‐Hill

y2 0.2⎤ 0.5⎥ 0.9⎥⎦

Fuzzy Composition Fuzzy Composition Suppose R˜ is a fuzzy relation on the Cartesian space X x Y, S˜ is a fuzzy relation on the Cartesian space Y x Z, and is a fuzzy relation on the Cartesian space X x Z; then fuzzy max‐ T˜ is a fuzzy relation on the Cartesian space X x Z;  then fuzzy max min and fuzzy max‐product composition are defined as

T˜ = R˜ o S˜ max − min

μT˜ (x,z) = ∨ (μ R˜ (x,y) ∧ μS˜ (y,z)) y ∈Y

max − product μT˜ (x,z) = ∨ (μ R˜ (x,y) • μS˜ (y, z)) y ∈Y

Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications: Timothy J. Ross, McGraw‐Hill

F Fuzzy Composition: C ii

Example (max min) Example (max‐min)

{ 1 ,z2 , z3 } X = {x { 1 , x2 }, } Y = {y { 1 , y2 }, } andd Z = {z Consider the following fuzzy relations:

y1 y2 ˜R = x1 ⎡ 0.7 0.5⎤ x 2 ⎢⎣ 0.8 0.4⎥⎦

and

z1 z2 z3 y1 ⎡0.9 0.6 0.5⎤ ˜ S= ⎢ y2 ⎣ 0.1 0.7 0.5⎥⎦

Using max‐min composition,

μT˜ (x1 ,z1 ) = ∨ ( μ R˜ (x1 ,y) ∧ μS˜ (y,z1 )) y∈Y

= max[min(0.7,0.9),min(0.5, 0.1)] = 0.7

Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications: Timothy J. Ross, McGraw‐Hill

}

z1 z2 z3 x1 ⎡ 0.7 0 7 0.6 0 6 0.5 0 5⎤ ˜ T= ⎢ x 2 ⎣ 0.8 0.6 0.4⎥⎦

F Fuzzy Composition: C ii

Example (max Prod) Example (max‐Prod)

{ 1 ,z2 , z3 } X = {x { 1 , x2 }, } Y = {y { 1 , y2 }, } andd Z = {z Consider the following fuzzy relations:

y1 y2 ˜R = x1 ⎡ 0.7 0.5⎤ x 2 ⎢⎣ 0.8 0.4⎥⎦

and

z1 z2 z3 y1 ⎡0.9 0.6 0.5⎤ ˜ S= ⎢ y2 ⎣ 0.1 0.7 0.5⎥⎦

Using max‐product composition,

μT˜ (x 2 , z2 ) = ∨ (μ R˜ (x2 , y) • μS˜ (y, z2 )) y ∈Y

= max[(0.8,0.6),(0.4, 0.7)] = 0.48 Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications: Timothy J. Ross, McGraw‐Hill

}

z1 z2 z3 x1 ⎡.63 63 .42 42 .25 25⎤ ˜ T= ⎢ x 2 ⎣.72 .48 .20⎥⎦

Application: Computer Engineering Application:  C E i i Problem: In computer engineering, different logic families are often  compared on the basis of their power‐delay product.  Consider the fuzzy  ~ ~ set F of logic families, the fuzzy set D of delay times(ns), and the fuzzy set  ~ P of power dissipations (mw) P of power dissipations (mw). ~ If F = {NMOS,CMOS,TTL,ECL,JJ}, ~ D = {0.1,1,10,100}, ~ P = {0.01,0.1,1,10,100} ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Suppose R1 = D x F  and R2 = F x P .01 .1 1 10 100 N 0.1 ⎡ 0 1 ⎢0 R˜1 = 10 ⎢ .4 100 ⎢⎣ 1

C 0 .1 1 .2

T 0 .5 1 0

E .6 1 0 0

J 1⎤ 0⎥ and 0⎥ 0⎥⎦

N C R˜2 = T E J

Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications: Timothy J. Ross, McGraw‐Hill

4 1 ⎡ 0 .4 ⎢.2 1 0 ⎢ 0 0 .7 ⎢0 0 0 ⎢ 1 .1 0 ⎣

.33 0 1 1 0

0⎤ 0⎥ 0⎥ .5⎥ 0 ⎥⎦

Application: Computer Engineering (Cont) Application:  C E i i (C ) We can use max‐min composition to obtain a relation between delay times  We can use max min composition to obtain a relation between delay times and power dissipation: i.e., we can compute                    or  R˜3 = R˜1 o R˜2

.01 ⎡ 01 1 0.1 ⎢ 1 ⎢.1 ˜ R3 = 10 ⎢.2 2 100 ⎢.2 ⎣

μR˜ = ∨(μ R˜ ∧ μ R˜ ) 3

1

2

.1 1 10 100 ⎤ .1 1 0 .6 6 .5 5 ⎥ .1 .5 1 .5⎥ 1 .7 7 1 0⎥ .4 1 .3 0 ⎥ ⎦

Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications: Timothy J. Ross, McGraw‐Hill

Application:   Fuzzy Relation: Petite

Application: Fuzzy Relation Petite Application:  F R l ti P tit Fuzzy Relation Petite defines the degree by which a person with  Fuzzy Relation Petite defines the degree by which a person with a specific height and weight is considered petite.   Suppose the range of the height and the weight of interest to us  are

{5’, 5 {5 5’1” 1 , 5 5’2” 2 , 5 5’3” 3 , 5 5’4” 4 ,5 5’5” 5 ,5 5’6”} 6 },  and 

{90, 95,100, 105, 110, 115, 120, 125} (in lb).  

Fuzzy Logic:Intelligence, Control, and Information, J. Yen and R. Langari, PrenticeHall

Application: Fuzzy Relation Petite Application:  F R l ti P tit We can express the fuzzy relation in a matrix form as shown  We can express the fuzzy relation in a matrix form as shown below: 90 95 100 105 110 115 120 125

5' ⎡ 1 1 1 1 1 1 5'1" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 1 .9 5' 2 5 2" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 1 .7 7 P˜ = 5' 3" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 .5 .3 5' 4" ⎢.8 .6 .4 .2 0 0 ⎢ 5' 5" .6 .4 .2 0 0 0 ⎢ 5' 6" ⎣ 0 0 0 0 0 0

.5 .2 ⎤ .3 .1⎥ .1 1 0⎥ 0 0⎥ 0 0⎥ ⎥ 0 0 ⎥ 0 0⎦

Fuzzy Logic:Intelligence, Control, and Information, J. Yen and R. Langari, PrenticeHall

Application: Fuzzy Relation Petite Application:  F R l ti P tit 90 95 100 105 110 115 120 125

5' ⎡ 1 1 1 1 1 5'1" 5 1 ⎢1 1 1 1 1 5' 2" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 1 P˜ = 5' 3" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 .5 5' 4" ⎢.8 .6 .4 .2 0 ⎢ 5' 5" .6 .4 .2 0 0 ⎢ 5' 6" ⎣ 0 0 0 0 0

1 .5 .2 ⎤ .9 .3 .1⎥ .7 .1 0 ⎥ .3 0 0 ⎥ 0 0 0⎥ ⎥ 0 0 0 ⎥ 0 0 0⎦

Once we define the petite fuzzy relation, we can answer two kinds of  Once we define the petite fuzzy relation we can answer two kinds of questions: • What is the degree that a female with a specific height and a specific weight  is considered to be petite? • What is the possibility that a petite person has a specific pair of height and  weight measures? (fuzzy relation becomes a possibility distribution)

Fuzzy Logic:Intelligence, Control, and Information, J. Yen and R. Langari, PrenticeHall

Application: Fuzzy Relation Petite Application:  F R l ti P tit Given a two‐dimensional fuzzy relation and the possible values of  Given a two‐dimensional fuzzy relation and the possible values of one variable, infer the possible values of the other variable using  similar fuzzy composition as described earlier. Definition: Let X and Y be the universes of discourse for variables x  and y, respectively, and xi and yj be elements of X and Y.  Let R be a fuzzy relation that maps X x Y to [0,1]  and the possibility distribution of X is known to be Πx(xi).  

Fuzzy Logic:Intelligence, Control, and Information, J. Yen and R. Langari, PrenticeHall

Application: Fuzzy Relation Petite Application:  F R l ti P tit The compositional rule of inference infers the possibility distribution of  Y as follows:

( j ) = max(min(Π ( i ( X (x ( i ),Π ) R (x ( i , y j ))) max‐min composition: Π Y (y xi max‐product composition:

Π Y (y ( j ) = max(Π X (x ( i ) × Π R (x ( i , y j )) xi

Fuzzy Logic:Intelligence, Control, and Information, J. Yen and R. Langari, PrenticeHall

Application: Fuzzy Relation Petite Application:  F R l ti P tit Problem: We may wish to know the possible weight of a petite female  who is 5’4”. h i 5’4” Using max‐min compositional, we can find the weight possibility  distribution of a petite person 5’4” distribution of a petite person 5 4  tall: tall: 90 95 100 105 110 115 120 125

5' ⎡ 1 1 1 1 1 1 .5 .2 ⎤ 5'1" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 1 .9 .3 .1⎥ 5' 2" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 1 .7 .1 0 ⎥ P˜ = 5' 3" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 .5 .3 0 0 ⎥ 5' 4" ⎢.8 .6 .4 .2 0 0 0 0 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ 5' 5" .6 .4 .2 0 0 0 0 0 ⎢ ⎥ 5' 6" ⎣ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ⎦

Fuzzy Logic:Intelligence, Control, and Information, J. Yen and R. Langari, PrenticeHall

Application: Fuzzy Relation Petite Application:  F R l ti P tit Problem: We may wish to know the possible weight of a petite female  who is about 5’4”. h i b 5’4” Assume About 5’4” is defined as  About 5’4” About‐5 4  = {0/5 = {0/5’, 0/5 0/5’1” 1 , 0.4/5 0 4/5’2” 2 , 0.8/5 0 8/5’3” 3 , 1/5 1/5’4” 4 , 0.8/5 0 8/5’5” 5 , 0.4/5 0 4/5’6”} 6 } Using max‐min compositional, we can find the weight possibility  distribution of a petite person about 5’4” tall: 90 95 100 105 110 115 120 125

5' ⎡ 1 1 1 1 1 1 .5 .2 ⎤ 5'1" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 1 .9 .3 .1⎥ 5' 2" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 1 .7 .1 0 ⎥ P˜ = 5' 3" ⎢ 1 1 1 1 .5 .3 0 0 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ 5' 4" .8 .6 .4 .2 0 0 0 0 ⎢ ⎥ 5' 5" .6 .4 .2 0 0 0 0 0 ⎢ ⎥ 5' 6" ⎣ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ⎦

Π weight (90) = (0 ∧1) ∨ (0 ∧1) ∨ (.4 ∧ 1) ∨ (.8 ∧1) ∨ (1 ∧ .8) ∨ (.8 ∧ .6) ∨ (.4 ∧ 0) = 0.8

Similarly, we can compute the possibility degree for  other weights The final result is other weights.  The final result is Π weight = {0.8 / 90,0.8 / 95,0.8 /100,0.8/ 105,0.5 /110,0.4 /115, 0.1/ 120,0 /125}

Fuzzy Logic:Intelligence, Control, and Information, J. Yen and R. Langari, PrenticeHall