Japanese Language Japanese I

Japanese Language Japanese I ... at least 100 kanji plus ... compositions whilst analyzing their structures and also writing compositions using around...

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Japanese Language

Japanese I Spring and Fall

8 Credits each

Winter Interim

2 Credits

Aimed at beginner level students with some previous experience studying Japanese language. Knowledge of at least 100 kanji plus hiragana and katakana is required. Students will become able to have basic everyday conversations as well as read and write using approximately 300 kanji. Grammar, conversation, listening and writing classes will use the textbook “Dekiru Nihongo”, reading classes will use “Tanoshii Yomimono 55” and kanji classes will use “Basic Kanji 500”. The objectives of Japanese Ⅰ are to: a) Be able to speak about and comprehend basic everyday topics concerning you. b) Be able to read about things you are interested in and information relevant to you. c) Be able to write about yourself and your opinions using simple words. d) Be able to read and write using 300 basic kanji. Classes: Classes will cover Grammar, Conversation, Listening, Reading, Writing and Kanji (a total of 8 classes per week) The examples of the class content: ・Practice being able to using new expression in conversations. ・Listen to the CDs and speak to classmates. ・Do activities using what you have learned from each chapter.(For instance, invite Japanese students and talk with them. Introduce your home town to them.) Textbooks: Dekiru Nihongo. Beginner, ALC 2011 Tanoshii Yomimono 55. Beginner and Pre-Intermediate, ALC 2013 New edition Basic Kanji 500 Vol. 1. Bonjinsha, 2015

Japanese II Spring and Fall

8 Credits each

Winter Interim

2 Credits

Aimed at students falling between beginner and intermediate levels of Japanese proficiency. The textbooks used, credits offered and contents covered are similar to those of Japanese Ⅰ, however the course is taught at an accelerated pace. In particular, students will study how to write in a style used by the general public and speak using polite Japanese. The objectives Japanese Ⅱ are to: a) Be able to speak about and comprehend everyday topics of conversation. b) Be able to read about things you are interested in and information relevant to you. c) Be able to write about yourself and your opinions. d) Be able to read and write using 500 basic kanji. Classes: Classes will cover Grammar, Conversation, Listening, Reading, Writing and Kanji (a total of 8 classes per week) The examples of the class content: ・Practice being able to using new expression in conversations. ・Listen to the CDs and speak to classmates. ・Do activities using what you have learned from each chapter.(For instance, invite Japanese students, bookshops

or convenience stores’ clerks as guests and interview them. Present your home country’s festivals.) Textbooks: Dekiru Nihongo Pre-Intermediate, ALC, 2012 Tanoshii Yomimono 55 Beginner and Pre-Intermediate, ALC, 2013 New Edition Basic Kanji 500 Vol. 2. Bonjinsha, 2015

Japanese III Spring and Fall

8 Credits each

Winter Interim

2 Credits

Aimed at students with an intermediate to advanced level of Japanese language proficiency. Students will become able to carry on natural conversations utilizing long sentences, honorific expressions (keigo) and complicated sentence structures. Students will practice reading long compositions whilst analyzing their structures and also writing compositions using around 1000 kanji. The objectives of Japanese Ⅲ are to: a) Be able to speak about and comprehend a wide range of topics. b) Be able to have coherent conversations at a close to native speed. c) Be able to read articles from newspapers and magazines covering a wide range of topics and summarize the contents. d) Be able to write about everyday topics and to write short essays about common issues. Classes ( number of frames) Listening(1)

Speaking a(1)

Speaking b(1)

Reading(1)

Writing(1) Grammar(2) Kanji & Vocabulary(1)

Class content(※other materials will occasionally be handled) ・Recognize necessary information from listening to simple daily news or an explanation. ・Through listening to conversations of daily life or college life, understand the outline of the conversations and being able to anticipate the course of the conversation. ・Present your opinions or thoughts properly.(speech, presentation) ・On the common topics, point out the advantages and disadvantages explaining the pro and con reasons. Listening to classmates’ remarks, present your opinion explaining the reasons. (discussion, debate) ・Practice speaking about school life or daily life.(request, solicitation, apology) ・Speak about your experiences and stories. ・Speak about familiar topics in your field of interest. ・Pick up the significant points from the articles on familiar subjects on newspapers or information magazines. ・Extract key points from long texts. ・Reading through short novels, understand the story, the plot and the motives of the characters’ acts. ・Learn the style and the expression of the written word. ・Write personal e-mails containing your personal experiences, feelings and events. Write an e-mail to the teacher to make an appointment. ・Write the details of your opinions or explanations in your field of interest. ・Learn Japanese grammar and expressions on the intermediate level to achieve the tasks. ・Learn kanji and vocabulary at the intermediate level.

Textbooks: Selected by each class instructor. The following have been used in the past. Challenge in Japanese! Speech & Discussion – Intermediate, Bonjinsha, 2012(Speaking) Japanese Live Broadcast – Pre- Intermediate Edition 1, Kuroshio, 2006(Listening) Japanese Writing for Higher Proficiency, Bonjinsha, 2012(Writing)

Japanese IV Spring and Fall

6 Credits each

Winter Interim

2 Credits

Aimed at students with an advanced level of Japanese language proficiency. Students will become able to have natural conversations whilst freely using complex sentence structures. With knowledge of about 1500 kanji, students will practice reading newspaper and magazine articles as well as essays. In writing class students will practice expressing their own opinions using appropriate expressions. Using movies, newspapers and other native materials students will practice Japanese at an advanced level The objectives of Japanese Ⅳ are to: a) Be able to listen to and comprehend conversations and news reports spoken at a native speed, as well as grasp the essential points. b) Be able to have coherent conversations at a close to native speed about a wide range of topics. c) Be able to read articles from newspapers and magazines covering a wide range of topics and to comprehend their structure and contents. d) Be able to write compositions at a university student level and to write short essays about common issues. Classes ( number of frames) Listening(1)

Speaking(1)

Reading(1)

Writing(1)

Integrated Study (2)

Class content(※other materials will occasionally be handled) ・Through listening to the lectures, discussions or debates, understand the content. ・Listening to live or a broadcast in standard Japanese, understand the topics commonly met in the personal, social, academic or vocational fields. ・Make a PPT on a chosen theme, and explain in detail showing the data. Answer the questions. (presentation, question and answer) ・Take an active part in discussions, make comments and form the hypotheses. (discussion, exchange opinions) ・Participate in interviews as either an interviewer or an interviewee. ・Read the various texts, such as paperback pocket books, newspapers, novels, and editorials, and understand the content. Furthermore, interpret them critically. ・Read and understand the long and complicated texts. ・Read with changing reading speed and being able to adapt to the reading speed appropriate for any particular text. ・Write essays and reports, explaining the reasons and the points systematically. ・Write letters, contributions, application motives and self-advertisement letters in appropriate style, right structure and development, keeping the audience in mind. ・After viewing the news, documentaries and interviews on the various topics including the current problems, discuss them. ・Write essays and reports in a clear structure, understanding relatively long and complicated texts, and putting necessary information in order.

Textbooks: Selected by each class instructor. The following have been used in the past. Reading Power pre-Advanced, Kuroshio, 2013(Reading) Academic Japanese for International Students Listening Pre-Advanced, 3A Network, 2014(Listening) 12 Steps for Essay Writing, 3A Network, 2009(Writing) Japanese Practice by Topic Advanced (Revised Edition), 3A Network, 2010(Integrated Study)

Japanese V Spring, Fall and Winter Interim 2 Credits each Aimed at students that have passed level N1 of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test and students with an equivalent level of Japanese. In class students will practice giving oral presentations and having debates. Also through freely using movies, TV dramas, newspapers, magazines and essays in class students will develop an upper advanced level of listening and reading comprehension skills. Students will also be trained in how to write articles and reports. The objectives of Japanese Ⅴ are to: a) Through listening to conversations, news reports and lectures covering a wide range of topics, be able to understand the contents logically and the relationships between the actors. b) Be able to speak about a wide range of topics logically, whilst properly explaining the foundation behind your statements. Be able to answer questions when giving presentations. c) Be able to read articles from newspapers and magazines covering a wide range of topics and to comprehend their structure and contents. d) Be able to produce reports at a university student level. Be able to write articles using a logical structure and proper foundation. Classes ( number of frames)

Class content(※other materials will occasionally be handled)

Integrated Study (2)

・After viewing the news, documentaries and interviews on the various topics including the current problems, discuss them. ・Write essays and reports in a clear structure, understanding relatively long and complicated texts, and putting necessary information in order.

Textbooks: Selected by each class instructor. The following have been used in the past. Listening/Presentation workbook Academic Skills Attainment, 3A Network, 2007 Read about Japanese Culture – Teaching materials for Advanced Students, ALC, 2008 Japanese Advanced Study (Revised Edition), Kenkyusha, 2006

Japanese Linguistics Ⅰ・Ⅱ Spring and Fall

2 Credits each

IMANI Ikumi

In this course, some linguistic aspects of Japanese will be discussed. The main purpose of this course is to develop the skill to analyze various aspects of natural languages through the study of Japanese. Students are required to participate actively in the class. In the spring term, the Japanese language in the ancient and medieval periods will be surveyed. Kanji and various characters / letters in the world also will be studied. In the fall term, the sounds of the medieval Japanese and the mechanisms of the modern Japanese will be studied. In the end of the spring / fall term, IJS students will be requested to give their presentations on specific issues of Japanese linguistics. When the IJS students collect Japanese data and make PowerPoint files for their presentations, non-IJS students will assist them. Contents: (Spring) 1. Ancient Japanese language: its early period and the background 2. Languages of the World 3. Japanese in the medieval period (Fall) 1. Japanese in the medieval period 2. Modern Japanese 3. Current issues in the Japanese linguistic study Textbooks: No textbook will be used. Language of Instruction: Japanese Grading: participation 40%, oral exam 60%

Japanese Speaking Spring and Fall

1 Credit each

IMANI Ikumi/ KUNISAWA Satomi/KONDO Yukihito

In this course, students are expected to enhance their skills of speaking Japanese. The course is for students at level I and II (once a week, 10 (or 9) weeks in total, 45 minutes practice). Each student will have two Japanese students as his/her partners (his/her partner will change after 5 weeks). The 80% attendance policy will be followed in this course. The grading will be based on attendance and classroom participation.



Japanese Area Studies

Japanese History Fall

2 Credits

KAGE Toshio

In this course, we learn the Japanese history as a subject in Atsuta, Nagoya, Owari, Aichi, and Tokai area where this school is located. Not only learn in a classroom, but also we take a walk through Atsuta and carry out an investigation into history Museum of the neighborhood. We investigate remains and ancient documents left in the field, and consider a local history image. [Contents] 1. Outline of Japanese history 2. The history of the Atsuta area 3. A plateau and old burial mound group of Atsuta 4. Nagoya of the ancient times and the middle ages 5. The history of Atsuta-jingu Shrine (Atsuta-jingu Shrine treasure building) 6. Three geniuses of Aichi 7. The Owari Tokugawas (The Tokugawa Art Museum) 8. Early modern Owari 9. Ukiyoe print of the Edo era (Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts) 10. The history of Tokaido 11. The history of Nagoya-shi (Nagoya City Museum) 12. The modernization of Nagoya [Textbook] Distribute it appropriately [Reference materials] "名古屋并熱田全図" Meiji 11(1878) year [Language of Instruction] Japanese [Grading] Attendance 80%, Report 20%

Japanese Literature Spring

2 Credits

FUJIMORI Hidemi

Japanese literature has over 1,000 years long history, and has been loved by a lot of people. Genji-Monogatari or The Tale of Genji is known as one of the oldest Japanese novels. Japanese people have been enjoying literature through not only reading but also by creating by themselves. Man’yoshu or The Anthology of Myriad Leaves contains the works created by the people of the various classes from ordinary to noble. In this course, we will read the Japanese literature works in various genres. Although the necessary grammatical guidance and words explanation will be provided, the aim of this course is rather to enjoy the works themselves than to learn these things. The goals of the course : 1. To be able to read the Japanese literature from various genres in the original wording. 2. To be able to express your own comments and discuss your impression of the works. The subject of the class : 1. The novel 1 “Midoriiro-no-Kedamono or The Little Green Monster 1” 2. The novel 2 “Midoriiro-no-Kedamono or The Little Green Monster 2” 3. The novel 3 “Midoriiro-no-Kedamono or The Little Green Monster 3” 4. The novel 4 “Midoriiro-no-Kedamono or The Little Green Monster 4” 5. The Haiku 1 What are the haikus? 6. The Haiku 2 Enjoy the fine haiku works.(Matsuo Basho, Yosa Buson, Kobayashi Issa) 7. The Haiku 3 Make Haikus. 8. The Essays 9. The Tanka 1 What are the tankas? 10. The Tanka 2 Enjoy the Kyoko Kuriki’s works. 11. The Tnaka 3 Enjoy the young poets works. Make tankas. 12. The Poem “Ikiru or To be alive” 13. Exam Grading Criteria 25% Attendance and Participation to the class. 25% Report on the subject 50% Exam Text Book : Printed materials will be provided. Language of Instruction : Japanese Note : This course is for the Class Ⅲ and upper. Enough Japanese ability needed to read Japanese works in their original wording.

Japanese Literature Fall

2 Credits

KATO Rie

In this course, the students will read Japanese classics (essays), haiku, and modern/contemporary novels. The main purpose of this course is to enjoy reading. Explanation of words and grammar will be provided, when it is necessary. Because materials intended for native readers will be used, this course is intended for Class Ⅲ and Class Ⅳ.

Contents:

1. Classics (Essays: Makurano Soshi, etc.) 2. Haiku works of early modern ~ contemporary period 3. Modern/contemporary novels(Haruki Murakami, etc.)

Japanese Economy Spring and Fall

2 Credits each

ABE Taro

Japanese economy has accomplished a dramatic recovery and joined in OECD countries from the defeat in 1945. But it has suffered from stagnation for a long time since the collapse of the Bubble economy in the early 1990s. What is worse, it was hit by the global monetary shock in 2008 and the Tohoku Earthquake in 2011. Now we Japanese are urged to overcome them. In this course we will learn the rough picture of the history and the present situation. We will also study the introduction to macroeconomics occasionally because it is necessary to understand this class.*There is a possibility the contents of this class will change. Contents: 1~2 Introduction 3~4 Recovery Era 5~6 High Speed Growth Era 7~8 Stable Growth Era 9~10 After the Collapse of Bubble Economy 11~12 The Present Situation Textbooks: Handouts and PowerPoint slides are distributed to participants as necessary. References: Tsuru, S. Japan’s Capitalism, Cambridge University Press, 1993 Language of instruction: Basically English Grading: Class participation (attendance and class discussion) 60% Term Paper or presentation on Japanese economy and society 40%

Japanese Business Management Spring 2 Credits NAKAMURA Yoshihisa The aim of this course is to make foreign students understand the characteristics of “traditional Japanese business management (nihon-teki keiei)” that laid the major foundations of economic growth of Japan after the Second World War. It is also included in this course how this “traditional management” has changed during the protracted recession following the collapse of the Bubble Economy, in parallel with rapid social developments caused by the low birth rate, the aging society, information technology, and so on. We also discuss some “new” styles of Japanese Management in the days of international society. Contents: 1. Japanese business system 1) fund raising and stockholding 2) employment 3) inter-company transaction 4) government and business 5) labor-management relations 2. Japanese business behavior 1) decision making 2) management philosophy and objectives 3) management strategy 3. Structural changes of business environment and Japanese management Textbooks: Printed materials will be distributed. Suggested Readings: Cheng, J.L.C.; Peterson, R.B. (eds.) Advances in international comparative Management, JAI Press Inc, 13 vols. 1984-2000. Language of Instruction: Japanese Grading: A term-paper

Japanese Business Management Fall

2 Credits

OKAMOTO Jun

The objective of this course is to introduce the characteristics of Japanese business and various aspects of Japanese management, which had achieved an incredible socio-economic success within very short period of time. The focus of the course will be on the uniqueness of Japanese management such as corporate strategy, organizational structure and process, human resource, distribution system and production system. These factors will be taught in comparison with the Western management style. Contents: 1. Introduction 2. Strategic management difference between Japanese and Western companies 3. The Organization of Japanese Company (organizational structure and process) 4. Human resource policy and management 5. Japanese Company group 6. Japanese Management today (Distribution system and Production system) 7. Japanese Management today (Supply chain management) 8. Japanese Management today (Internationalization) 9. Japanese Management today (Marketing and Innovation) 10. Japanese Management today (CSR) 11. New Japanese management (21’st Centuries) 12. Case Study and Presentation Textbooks: Printed materials will be distributed Reference: James C. Abbeglen, “21st Century Japanese Management”, Palgrave Macmillan, 2006 ISBN-10: 1403998760, ISBN-13: 978-1403998767 ジェームス・C・アベグレン, 山岡 洋一 (翻訳)、『新・日本の経営』日本経済新聞社 2004 ISBN-13: 978-4532311889 Language of Instruction: J/E Grading: Class participation (attendance and class discussion) 40% Term Paper 60%

Japanese society Fall 2 Credits KIMURA Koshin + NAGATA Kozue This course aims at understanding of Japanese society in general, through review and analysis of (i) its historical and cultural backgrounds, (ii) human behaviors, and (iii) socio-political and economic trends and outlooks. Students are expected to look into a series of contemporary and emerging social issues of Japan; including, among others, environmental sustainability, pollution and Japanese responses to environmental challenges, energy and natural resources, approach to social welfare and social services, emerging demographic trends and ageing, and gender/changing status and roles of Japanese women, Furthermore, the course will briefly touch upon a few basic issues of Japanese religions, UNESCO world heritage sites, and Japanese diplomacy in the globalized world. Objectives : 1.Understanding historical backgrounds of Japanese society 2.Learning and experiencing Japanese daily life and life style 3.Reviewing and understanding the contemporary and emerging social challenges and opportunities in Japan Lessons : 1.Introduction to nature and society in Japan 2.Characteristics of natural environment 1 – from the geographical perspective 3.Characteristics of natural environment 2 – from the perspective of natural structure, four seasons and Japanese esthetic sense of beauty 4.Urban cities and rural communities in Japan

5.Japanese industries, natural resources and energy 6.Considering Japanese life styles 7.Basics of Japanese society, popular culture and politics 8.Religions in Japan, linguistic diversity, and issues related to minorities (e.g. Ainu and Okinawa) 9.Japanese architecture and UNESCO world heritage sites 10. Gender issues and dynamism in the roles of Japanese women 11. Japanese diplomacy and contribution to the United Nations 12.Demographic challenges: ageing population and social welfare/social services + individual presentation Evaluation and grading : Performance will be evaluated, and the final grade will be marked, in the following manner. 1.Participation in the first half of the course 10% 2. Report (writing assignment) for the first half of the course 40% 3. Participation in the second half of the course 10% 4. Individual project and presentation for the second half of the course 40% Language of delivery : English and Japanese Text, references, resources and other materials : A power-point presentation and/or a hand out will be prepared for each session, as appropriate and as needed.

Tourism in Japan Spring and Fall

2 Credits each

MURATA Kumiko

The number of foreign visitors to Japan has been increasing significantly in the recent years. In this class, we will focus on inbound tourism in central japan region. During the course, we will have an opportunity to invite a personnel of Tourism section at Aichi Prefecture to learn about the highlights of Aichi. We also plan to invite an owner of sake brewery in Nagoya to find about sake making. During these classes with guest speakers, we will have discussions how we can promote tourism in Japan. According to the Japan National Tourism Organization, JNTO, the number of tourists visiting Japan in 2015 was 19.737milion. This is the first time that the number of foreign visitors to Japan exceeded that of Japanese tourists going abroad. A 47.1 % jump from the previous year. The Japanese government has set tourism as one of the pillars of its growth strategy. It would be a good opportunity for international students to learn about the status of Japanese tourism. In this course, the lectures are given by a Japan’s Certified Tour guide instructor. The aim of this course is for students to acquire basic knowledge on major sightseeing spots in Chubu area. It will include interactive discussions among students and instructor/guest speakers. The course is designed for students with Japanese level III or above, as the language of the instruction will be in Japanese in Spring term. The lectures will be fully given in English in the fall term, so the Japanese level will not be considered for the fall term. Evaluation: Class attendance Oral Presentation/Final examination Assignments Course Description In this introductory seminar, students will learn the basic skills and knowledge to guide at popular Japanese sightseeing spots specially in Chubu region. This course will introduce Japanese tourist destinations so that students can guide their friends and families at major sightseeing sites as a first step in their development. The first half of the seminar will focus on major tourism spots in Central Japan. We plan to invite speakers in one of two days during the latter half of the course. A mini test of 47 prefectures, is given in each class in order to help students learn basic names and locations of Japanese prefectures. Course Schedule 1. Introduction : Manjor sightseeing spots in Japan /Current status of Inbound tourism in Japan 2. Major tourist spots in Nagoya and One day trip destinations . 3. Nagoya Castle 4. Takayama & Shirakawago Village, the World Heritage site

5. Field Trip destination 6. Ise Shrine and Iga Ueno 7. Guest talk: Charms of Aichi by Aichi Prefectural government staff 8. Guest talk : Japanese sake by sake brewery owner in Nagoya 9. Oral Presentations about to promote tourism in Aichi/Japan 10.Final Examination While this is the general plan for the course, changes may be made to this schedule as needed.

Japanese Culture Spring and Fall 2 Credits each MASUDA Yoshiharu In this course, kinematics, vocalization, dialogue and traditional music (Shamisen) of Kabuki will be elaborated to study Japanese culture. “Ma”, one of the vital factors of Japanese culture will be examined by video and sound analysis. Students are invited to watch “Sukeroku”, the most famous Edo Kabuki to learn Japanese culture inductively. Active discussions based on assigned readings and video material are essential. Schedule 1. Introduction to the course 2. What is “Kabuki”? (http://iis-db.stanford.edu/docs/140/kabuki.pdf) 3. Japanese gait analysis: (http://www.bartleby.com/186/1.html) “An introduction to the Study of Speech” chapter 1, Introductory: Language defined, first paragraph of Language: by Edward Sapir, 1921 4. Japanese brain: esthetics & Shamisen music: (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Znm06U_7WEk ) http://www2s.biglobe.ne.jp/nippon/file/jog240e.html 5. Kabuki study 1. Sukeroku (gait analysis of Agemaki) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkbrsR855T4 6. Kabuki study 2. Sukeroku (gait analysis of Sukeroku) 7. Integration of Kabuki & Bach (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9FhJb-O7jc ) 8. Kabuki study 3: Sukeroku (speech analysis of Agemaki) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B6tcDGDTMU 9. Kabuki study 4: Sukeroku (speech analysis of Sukeroku) 10. Kabuki study 5: Sukeroku part 5 (pause analysis) 11. Students’ presentation on Kabuki and Japanese Culture 12. Tora-san series 1 gait analysis of Tora san 13. Tora-san series 2 speech analysis of Tora san 14. Summary

International Relation in Japan Fall

2 Credits

Japan in Asia-History of Japan/China Relations

NAKATA Shoichi

What had some years ago been a partnership of friendship between China and Japan has become a relationship based on hostility and mutual hatred creating a very dangerous global state of affairs. Yet, in light of this fact, Japan and China are two of the world’s largest economic trading partners so neither can afford to view the other as an enemy. Therefore, in order to construct a plan for healthy Japanese/Chinese relations calm arguments must be sought. This is especially true concerning damage created by differing historical accounts between Japan and China. In this course we will examine the historical relationship between Japan and China as well as discussing possible solutions for rectifying the problems caused by these historical discrepancies.

Course Description: 1. Historical East Asia 2. Japanese envoys to China and the Japanese State 3. The Mongolian invasion and Japanese society 4. The change of viewpoints after the Meiji Restoration 5. Westernization and the Meiji Restoration 6. The Sino-Japanese War 7. The First World War and Japanese/Chinese Relations 8. The Manchuria Incident 9. The development of Zaikabo 10. The Japanese/Chinese War 11. Post war Japan/China Relations 12. The present state of those retuning to Japan Textbooks: Rekishi Kyoikusha Kyogikai. Higashi azia sekai to nihon. Aokishoten, 2004 Ogata, I. Chugoku no Rekishi 12 Nihon ni totte chugoku to wa nanika. Kodansha, 2005 Language of Instruction : Japanese Grading: Attendance and Class participation 80%, Report 20%

Seminar on Japanese Studies 1 : Japanese Culture and Art Ⅰ Spring and Fall 2 Credits each

TAGUCHI Tomohiro

Spring COURSE DESCRIPTION Japan located east of the Asian continent has formed the culture and art by absorbing a variety of continental cultural influence. Moreover, Japan worked on the intake of the Western civilization with passion in recent times, and suiting it into the society Japan achieved the modernization of the society in a short term. In addition, various popular cultures and arts effloresced on the base of such a modernization in postwar Japan. This course seeks historically the culture and art of traditional Japan which was formed by the exchange with the Asian continent COURSE GOALS The goal of this course is the multi-faceted understanding of Japan by seeking the achieved points of the Japanese culture and art from a historical angle. For that purpose this course will survey historically the culture and art of the traditional Japan from the prehistoric age to the Edo period. Spotlighting the activity of Imperial court nobles, aristocrats, priests, samurai warriors, merchants, townsfolk and some westerners this course discusses how they created their culture and art, and how they refined their esthetic sense. Students will understand domestic and international factors that prompted the development of art and culture of Japan Students will broaden their view of Japanese culture and art by getting to know representative objects of each period of time. These will include pottery, painting, Buddhist art, craft work, architecture, Noh, Kabuki, literature and others. Students will understand the traditional esthetic senses which still have an influence upon modern Japan Students will come to know the background of historical cities such as Kyoto, Nara, Tokyo and Kamakura. Contents: 1. Start of the cultural formation of the prehistoric age (Jomon Culture) The feature of Japanese cultural formation and the development of the prehistoric age and its esthetic sense 2. Cultural formation of the prehistoric age (Yayoi culture and Kofun culture) The development of culture and art from the Yayoi period to the Kofun period 3. Dawning of Buddhism and the period of imitative learning (Asuka, Hakuho and Tempyo culture) Buddhism’s impact and its expansion, three-staged development of Buddhist art style, and the prevalence of the

Chinese character. 4. Development of Buddhist Art The development of painting, sculpture, architecture and craft art under Buddhism 5. Development of the aristocrats’ culture in the Heian period The development of the Tang style culture, the impact of the esoteric Buddhism and the expanse of Jodo belief, and kokufu culture 6. Art and esthetic sense of the aristocrats The refinement of the esthetic sense of the aristocrats and the development of their art style focusing on the painting scrolls and other art works 7. Development of samurai culture How samurai warriors had come in to power and how they created their style in the culture and art field 8. Development of Zen culture The development of the Zen culture and esthetic sense under the influence of Zen Buddhism 9. Noh play How the Noh play was accomplished and analysis of its special feature, referring to some Noh program 10. Momoyama culture and the esthetic sense, wabi The esthetic sense that was developed under the new political leaders, focusing on “tea ceremony” and the trend of art field 11. Culture of Edo period and the esthetic sense of iki How the culture was developed in the Kamikata region and Edo city, focusing on the esthetic sense of the townspeople 12. Bunraku and Kabuki How bunraku and kabuki were developed and how the audience enjoyed these theaters Language of Instruction: English Teaching Materials: Handouts, Catalog books, videotapes, and slide films, etc Grading: Attendance 30%; Home work and Presentation 30%; Final paper (ca. 2.000 words) 40% [Students are required to read at least one book to write the final paper].

Fall COURSE DESCRIPTION Japan located east of the Asian continent has formed the culture and the art by absorbing a variety of continental cultural influence. Moreover, Japan worked on the intake of the Western civilization with passion in recent times, and suiting it into the society Japan achieved the modernization of the society in a short term. In addition, various popular cultures and arts effloresced on the base of such a modernization in postwar Japan. This course seeks the cultural and artistic result accomplished through the interaction with Western civilization in modern Japan, and the development and current situation of popular culture that became active in postwar Japan. COURSE GOALS The goal of this course is the multi-faceted understanding of Japan’s modernization by seeking the attained points of the culture and art fields from paintings to video games. Students will understand how Japan had modernized in the fields of culture and art in order to meet the global and Western standard. Students will understand remarkable factors which have raised global awareness of Japanese media such as manga, anime, jidaigeki movie, video game, etc. Contents: 1. Modernizing Japan How Japanese modernization began and the process of the cultural development until recent days. 2. Attendance at world expositions and Japonism How Japanese culture and art debuted on the world stage through the attendance at the world expositions. 3. The start of modernization in arts How Japanese artists began the modernization of their artworks.

4. The Geisha and their culture in modern Japan The active roles of Geisha for the modernization and women’s social activity in the Meiji period. 5. The tradition of Ainu and modernization Ainu history and culture and the reverse side of Japan’s modernization. 6. Natsume Soseki and the modernization How the modernization of literature began and how the people faced the modernization -referring to several works by Natsume Soseki and Mori Ogai. 7. The history of the cinema in Japan How the movie had developed from the beginning of its history in Japan. 8. A special-effects movie and Tsuburaya Eiji How Japanese special-effects movie began and the war experience of the Japanese as seen through the special-effects movies directed by Tsuburaya Eiji. 9. The cinema and culture during the war and post-war Japan The achievements of several directors who were active from the war to the post-war period, focusing on Yamanaka Sadao, Kurosawa Akira, Mizoguchi Kenji, Ozu Yasujiro, Naruse Mikio and Gosyo Heinosuke. 10. The history of manga and Tezuka Osamu The history of manga and how Osamu Tezuka developed manga as an influential medium. 11. The development of animation and Hayao Miyazaki The development of ‘anime,’ focusing mainly on Miyazaki Hayao’s works. 12. Game industries and the creators of gaming The development of the video game industry from a historical view point, focusing on several Japanese video game creators. Language of Instruction: English Teaching Materials: Handouts, Catalog books, videotapes and slide films, etc Grading: Attendance 30%; Home work and Presentation 30%; Final paper (ca. 2.000 words) 40% [Students are required to read at least one book to write the final paper].

Intercultural Communication Spring and Fall

2 Credits each

YOSHINO Isao

In our modern age, we are beginning to lose the walls and borders of the boundaries of countries; bringing more and more varying peoples and cultures together. Because of this, learning intercultural communication is becoming increasingly important. When people interact with people from different cultures, it sometimes happens that words of good will can be taken as an insult. This is one of the pitfalls that you least expect to encounter within your own culture. However, misinterpretation and miscommunication are a reality of cross-cultural communication. This comes from the fact that each culture has their own way of thinking and their own unique set of values, which differ from one culture to the next. In order to help students understand the unique ways of Japanese custom, thinking and values, this course will introduce several examples of intercultural conflicts which have occurred during actual business ventures. Contents 1. What is “Intercultural Communication”? 2. Characteristics of Japanese Business Style & Japanese Business People 3. Work Ethics of Japanese Business People 4. Case 1) The Way Toyota People Do Business 5. Case 2) Japan-US Trade Friction (automobile field) 6. Case 3) Opening of a Joint Venture Between Toyota and GM (NUMMI) 7. Case 4) Basic Philosophy of NUMMI 8. Case 5) Changes That Happened to NUMMI Employees 9. Intercultural Conflicts at Business Fields (1) 10. Intercultural Conflicts at Business Fields (2)

11. Intercultural Conflicts at Business Fields (3) 12. Lessons Learned from Intercultural Conflict Experiences Textbooks: Handouts will be distributed. Language of Instruction: English Grading: Class Participation 60%, Term Paper 40%

Sport 1

-Spring: Tennis, Fall: Badminton-

Spring & Fall 2 Credits each SHIRAI Toru The growth and development of both the mind and body is indispensable for a healthy university experience. Therefore sports are an important component of student life. Tennis and Badminton is sports which can be done with friends and family throughout one’s whole life. Please seize the opportunity to learn this wonderful games. [Class Purpose] The purpose of this class is summarized by the following three points. (1) Developing harmony of the mind and body through the practice of tennis and badminton. (2) Learn fair play through competition and collaboration with others. (3) Have fun through practice and participation in tennis and badminton. [Points of Concern] Students who find exercising together with other students physically difficult should consult with the teacher in charge.

[Spring term] TENNIS 1) Racket work (How do you use) 2) Forehand stroke 3) Backhand stroke 4) Stroke, service 5) Volley service 6) Service, rally 7) Double formation (1) 8) Double formation (2) 9) Double formation (3) 10) Double game 11) Double game 12) Double game 13) Test 14) Term-end examination period 15) Term-end examination period Textbooks: Printed materials will be distributed. Language of Instruction: English Grading: Class participation and report

[Fall term] BADMINTON 1) Explanation and basic motion (about grip flight) 2) High clear, a drive, clear practice

3) Drive, a smash, practice of hairpin 4) High clear, a smash, practice of a drop shot 5) Check of 5 basic techniques, and half court practice 6) Footwork (a drop shot, net flight combination, and smash net flight clear combination) 7) About a serve, receipt, and a headwork 8) Explanation of a doubles game 9) About doubles game 10) Doubles game tactics (side by side) 11) Doubles game tactics (top and back) 12) Doubles game tactics (diagonal) 13) Test 14) Term-end examination period 15) Term-end examination period Textbooks: Printed materials will be distributed. Language of Instruction: English Grading: Class participation and report

Sport 2 (Karate Ⅰ) ・

Sport 3 (Karate Ⅱ)

Spring and Fall 2 Credits each IDEGUCHI Zenji The nature of this course is to introduce you to Karate-do which is a part of traditional Japanese culture. Karate-do, introduced to Okinawa from China, is an empty hand form of self defense which uses the hands and feet to punch, strike, block and kick. This course is designed for the beginning student and will be conducted in an enjoyable atmosphere. During class you will be taught basics, forms, prearranged sparring techniques, free sparring, self defense techniques, and the manners, respect, discipline, and etiquette of martial arts. Attendance is mandatory, and you will be expected to participate in class as well as practice and review the course material on your own. By the end of the course you may test for an advanced rank if you like, and perhaps you’ll be able to experience Kobudo and Iaido, ancient weaponry and swordsmanship. Hopefully, you’ll be able to return to your country with a better concept of self defense. Contents: 1-2. Learning of manners, respect, and the proper mental attitude. Practice elementary movements and demonstration. 3-4. Basic technique training (striking, punching, kicking, blocking, body positioning) 5. Basic kata 6. Basic bunkai (application of the kata) 7-8. Kumite (practice with partners) 9-10. Self defense techniques 11. Review of the class 12. Review of the class and demonstration 13. Practical exam Text book: Language: Attire: Grading:

Handout materials will be given during the class Conducted in Japanese Comfortable, loose clothing Attendance 80%, practical exam 20

Internship After Winter Interim

2 Credits

IJS has internship programs offering supervised practical work experiences in Japanese business, education, public service, and art center. An internship includes lectures, sightseeing, and meeting with Japanese workers. Participants are required to be proficient in Japanese conversation. This two-week program will be offered in February. Applicants must be able to satisfy the essential demands of the jobs.

Studies in Japanese Area 1 - 5 Spring and Fall

2 Credits each

NGU undergraduate division courses (Subjects in Social Science) are transferable to “Studies in Japanese Area 1-5”. Only students who are taking or have taken Japanese Ⅳ or Ⅴ are allowed to take this course after obtaining permission from the instructor.