Natural Sciences

We educate our students to analyze natural phenomena with ... helps us learn how to solve our everyday problems more creatively and rationally. ... Ph...

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College of

Natural Sciences A Creative Approach to Science In 1984, the Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry departments were separated from the College of Liberal Arts to form the College of Natural Sciences. The Department of Statistics was added in 1988. In 2001, the Bioinformatics and Life Science program was launched, making the College of Natural Sciences what it is today. We educate our students to analyze natural phenomena with methodologies that are mathematical and logical. We also instruct them to resolve problems with creativity and reason. Our ultimate aim is to train young scholars with the requisite capability and willingness to serve the nation and humanity through their academic pursuits.

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Mathematics Mathematics, with its emphasis on numbers, quantity, form, and relations, is a field of study which requires careful analysis and clear reasoning. It is, therefore, one of the most useful divisions of human knowledge, and the knowledge and skills obtained from mathematics play an essential role in the development of technology-the tools, materials, techniques, and sources of power that make our lives easier and our nation more advanced. Mathematical training also helps us learn how to solve our everyday problems more creatively and rationally. Phone: 02 820 0410; [email protected]; office hours: Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. 1 p.m 5: 30 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. 12 p.m. Year

Classification

General required course

1st Semester Course Titles Chapel The Bible for Modern People Freshman Communicative English I Computer Practice I-Excel Course

Hours Points 3

2

3 1

1 1

Level

Notes Classification

General required course

1

2

General elective course

(Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses)

Major compulsory course

Calculus Ⅰ Physics and Lab Computer Programming and Practices

General required course General elective course Major required course

Chapel Practical Reading & Writing (Selection out of 8 Fields of General

Major elective course

3

General required course Major required course Major elective course

4

3 3

4

3

3

2 2-4

Elective Courses) 3

3

Set Theory Linear Algebra I

3

3

3 3

3 3

Chapel

Major compulsory course General required course General elective course Major Intermediate Minor required course Intermediate Major elective Intermediate course Intermediate General required Intermediate course Major Intermediate Minor required course

Modern Algebra I

3

3

General Topology I Complex Analysis I Geometry

3

3 Intermediate

3 3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate 3 Advanced

3 3 3

3 3 3

3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Advanced Calculus Applied Linear Algebra Major elective course

3 4

Mathematical Analysis I

Differential Equations

General elective course

4-6

Topics in Topology Topics in Algebra Numerical Analysis Financial Mathematics



Advanced Advanced Advanced

Major elective course

Major elective course

2nd Semester Course Titles Chapel Reading & Writing Freshman Communicative English II Computer Practice II-PowerPoint Course

Hours Points 3

3

3 1

1 1

Level

Notes

Servant Leader ship (32) 1 (Selection out of 8 Fields of General 4-6 Elective Courses) Calculus II Chemistry and Lab

3 4

3 3

Statistics Chapel TOEIC 800

3

3

3

(Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses)

2 2-4

Mathematical Analysis II

3

3 Intermediate Minor

Linear Algebra II

3

3 Intermediate

Number Theory Discrete Mathematics

3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Chapel

Intermediate

Modern Algebra II

3

3 Intermediate Minor

General Topology II

3

3 Intermediate

Complex Analysis II Differential Geometry Mathematical Statistics

3 3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate 3 Advanced

Topics in Analysis Cryptology History of Mathematics

3 3 3

3 Advanced 3 Advanced 3 Intermediate

Topics in Applied Mathematics

3

3

Advanced

Notes: 1) General elective courses should be completed over 15 credits, whose areas should spread over more than five areas including the foreign languages area out of eight areas. 2) A candidate for a double major in Mathematics is required to obtain at least 36 credits of major courses, including major compulsory courses. 3) A minor candidate must complete at least 21 credits of major courses, including nine credits of required courses for a minor, as listed in the chart above.

130 Soongsil University Catalog

Faculty Members and Areas of Research College of Natural Sciences

Yie, Sang-Suk, Professor, Topology, (Ph.D., SNU, 1987) Kim, Yeon-Ok, Professor, Algebra, (Ph.D., Korea Univ, 1988) Jeong, Kwang-Sik, Professor, Topology, (Ph.D., SNU, 1989) Park, Eun-Soon, Professor, Algebra, (Ph.D., Kansas State Univ. 1989) Hwang, Sun-Wook, Professor, Analysis & Math education, (Ph.D., Univ. of Connecticut, 1990) Jeong, Dal-Young, Professor, Applied Mathematics, (Ph.D., City Univ. of New York, 1992) Kim, Pil-Ho, Associate Professor, Analysis, (Ph.D., SNU, 1988) Lee, Eui-Woo, Associate Professor, Applied Mathematics, (Ph.D., Ohio State Univ. 1993) Kim, Jeong-Heon, Associate Professor, Complex Analysis, (Ph.D., Univ. of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, 1994)

Calculus I, 3-3 This is a first course in calculus. Topics include basic concepts and techniques of differentiation and integration for elementary functions including transcendental functions, antidifferentation, fundamental theorems of calculus, the Riemann integral, and the polar coordinate system. Physics and Lab, 4-3 The same as the Physics and Lab course in the Physics Department. Computer Programming and Practices, 4-3 The same as Computer Programming and Practice course in the Statistics Department. Calculus II, 3-3 This is a second course in calculus including vector analysis. Topics include sequences, infinite series, power series, inner products, cross products, vectors in Euclidean space, multiple integrals, and surface integrals.

Mathematics

Chemistry and Lab, 4-3 The same as Chemistry and Lab course in the Chemistry Department. Statistics, 3-3 The same as Statistics course in the Statistics Department. Mathematical Analysis I, II, 3-3 This course involves the careful treatment of the theoretical aspects of the calculus of the functions of a real variable. Topics include sequences, series, the limit and continuity of functions, differentiation, Riemann integrals, sequences and series of functions, and uniform convergence. Set Theory, 3-3 This is a basic course of the foundations of mathematics. Topics include classes and sets, functions, relations, partially ordered classes, the axiom of choice, Zorn's lemma, and the arithmetic of cardinal and ordinal numbers. Linear Algebra I, II, 3-3 This is an introductory course emphasizing the techniques of linear algebra. Topics include matrix operations, determinants, the system of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and applications to differential equations.

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Differential Equations, 3-3 This is a basic course emphasizing the techniques of ordinary differential equations. Topics include the existence and uniqueness of solutions and the general theory of differential equations-first order differential equations, higher-order differential equations, and systems of differential equations, series solutions, and Laplace transformations. Number Theory, 3-3 This course is an elementary introduction to number theory. Topics include divisors, prime numbers, congruences, primitive roots, continued fractions, and algebraic numbers. Discrete Mathematics, 3-3 This course is designed to serve as an introduction to the concepts of finite mathematics. Topics include sets and mathematical logic, counting, graph theory, Boolean algebra, basic probability, linear systems, matrices, linear programming, and applications. Modern Algebra I, II, 3-3 This course is designed to serve as an introduction to the concepts of abstract algebra. Topics include groups, subgroups, homomorphism, isomorphism, free groups, rings, commutative rings, ideals, modules, and fields. General Topology I, II, 3-3 This course is a study of topological spaces and maps. Topics include metric spaces, topological spaces, continuous functions, product spaces, separable spaces, countability, connected sets, compactness, Tychonoff theorem, metrizability, and paracompactness. Complex Analysis I, II, 3-3 This course is for students who desire a rigorous introduction to the theory of functions of a complex variable. Topics include the complex number system, analytic functions, Cauchy's theorem, the maximum modulus theorem, series expansion, the argument principle, and the residue theorem. Geometry, 3-3 This course is a study of the central aspects of two-dimensional Euclidean geometry. Topics include Euclid's postulates, parallel postulates, projective geometry, hyperbolic geometry, and geometric transformations. Advanced Calculus, 3-3 This course includes a study of the careful development of elementary real analysis including such topics as the functions of several variables, differentiation and integral of vector-valued functions, Jacobian, the inverse function theorem, the implicit function theorem, and change of variables in integration. Differential Geometry, 3-3 This course involves the application of calculus to the study of the shape and curvature of curves and surfaces. Topics include an introduction to vector fields, differential forms on Euclidean spaces, Frenet's formulas, geodesics, the mappings of surfaces, and Riemann geometry. Mathematical Statistics, 3-3 This course introduces students to the useful and interesting ideas of the mathematical theory of probability and to a number of applications of probability. Topics include probability, random variables, probability distribution functions, confidence interval, and the testing of hypotheses.

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College of Natural Sciences

Applied Linear Algebra, 3-3 This course involves the study of the careful development of linear algebra including such topics as the diagonalization of matrices, orthogonalization, primary decomposition, numerical linear algebra, and linear differential equations. Topics in Topology, 3-3 This course includes a basic introduction to the study of algebraic topology. Topics include homotopy, fundamental groups, covering spaces, simplicial complexes, and homology. Topics in Algebra, 3-3 This course is a study of field theory. Topics include the structures of finite groups, Galois Theory, homology, and categories. Numerical Analysis, 3-3 This course is designed for students who want to learn basic numerical methods and programming skills. Topics include the Gaussian elimination method for solving linear systems, bisection and Newton's method, numerical differentiation and integration, interpolation and polynomial approximation, numerical methods for ordinary differential equations, numerical methods for approximating eigenvalues, and error analysis. Financial Mathematics, 3-3 This course is an introduction to mathematical topics and problem solving technique used in finance and economics. Topics include probability, partial differential equations, and numerical analysis.

Mathematics

Topics in Analysis, 3-3 This course is a basic introduction to the study of measure theory and partial differential equations. Topics include the real number system, measures, Lebesque integrals, convergence theorems of integrals, measures and derivatives, first order partial differential equations, and elementary second-order partial differential equations (such as Laplace equations, wave equations, heat equations). Cryptology, 3-3 The course covers encryption and decryption in secure codes. Topics include classical cryptosystems and their cryptanalysis, the Data Encryption Standard, Euclidean algorithms, the Chinese remainder theorem, RSA cryptosystem, primality testing, factoring algorithms, EIGamal cryptosystem, the discrete log problem, other public key cryptosystems, signature schemes, hash functions, key distribution, and key agreement. History of Mathematics, 3-3 This course is designed to introduce students to the development of mathematical thinking from ancient to modern times. It also covers some important mathematical results and their inference processes. Topics in Applied Mathematics, 3-3 This course is designed to cover advanced theories of applied mathematics and to introduce students to recent topics on applied mathematics.

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Physics The objectives of education in the Department of Physics are to provide a student with an environment that supports his or her endeavor to become a worthy contributor to the welfare of mankind through studies of naturally occurring, fundamental phenomena, and the search of applications to promote the quality of life based on the knowledge acquired. In pursuit of these objectives, the Department of Physics expects of its students to strive for: 1. A profound understanding of the fundamental phenomena of nature 2. The advancement of analytical skills 3. A search for worthy applications of their knowledge and skills acquired through a physics education Phone: 02-820-0420; [email protected]; office hours: Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 12 p.m., 1 p.m - 5: 30 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Year

Classification

General required course

1st Semester Course Titles Chapel The Bible for Modern People Freshman Communicative English I Computer Practice I-Excel Course

Hours Points 3

3

3 1

1 1

Level

Notes Classification

General required course

1

2

General elective course

Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses

Major compulsory course

Calculus 1 Physics 1 and Lab Chemistry I and Lab

3 4 4

Physics 2

2

Major required course General required course General elective course

Major elective course

3

General required course Major required course Major elective course

4

Major elective course

Chapel Practical Reading & Writing Selection out of 8 Fields of General

3

Elective Courses Mechanics 1

3

Modern Physics Modern Physics Lab Mathematical Physics1

3 4 3

Wave Phenomena Future Plans

3 1

Hours Points 3

Level

2

General elective course

Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses

3 3 3

Major compulsory course

Calculus 2 Physics 3 and Lab Chemistry 2 and Lab

3 4 4

3 3 3

Physics 4

2

2 Intermediate

Chapel TOEIC 800 Selection out of 8 Fields of General

3

2

Major required course General required 2 course General 2-4 elective course 3 Intermediate Minor Major required 3 Intermediate course Major 2 Intermediate elective course 3 Intermediate 2 Intermediate

3 Intermediate 1 Intermediate General required course

Quantum Mechanics 1

3

3 Intermediate Minor

Statistical Physics 1 Electricity and Magnetism 2

3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Electromagnetism Lab Application Programming Solid State Physics

4 3 3

2 Intermediate 3 Intermediate 3 Advanced

Nuclear and Particle Physics Advanced Lab Current Topics in Physics

3 4 3

3 2 3

Advanced Advanced Advanced

Thesis Research in Physics 1

2

1

Advanced

Major elective course

Major elective course

Notes

Freshman Communicative English II 3 1 Computer Practice II-PowerPoint Course 1 1 (32) 1 Servant Leadership

4-6

Chapel

134 Soongsil University Catalog

2nd Semester Course Titles Chapel Reading & Writing

4-6

2-4

Elective Courses Electricity and Magnetism 1

3

3 Intermediate Minor

Mechanics 2 Mathematical Physics 2

3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Electronics Electronics Lab

3 4

3 Intermediate 2 Intermediate

Chapel Quantum Mechanics 2

3

3 Intermediate

Statistical Physics 2 Optics

3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Advanced

Optics Lab Computer Simulation Semiconductor Physics

4 3 3

2 3 3

New Material Physics Relativity and Cosmology Thesis Research in Physics 2

3 3 2

3 Advanced 3 Advanced 1 Intermediate

Advanced Advanced Advanced

※ Notes: College of Natural Sciences

1) General elective courses should be completed over 15 credits, whose areas should spread over more than five areas including the foreign languages area out of eight areas. 2) A candidate for a double major in Physics is required to obtain at least 36 credits of major courses, including major compulsory courses. 3) A minor candidate must complete at least 21 credits of major courses, including nine credits of required courses for a minor, as listed in the chart above. 4) To pursue a double major in Mathematics, students in Humanities, Law, Social Sciences and Business & Economics must take two courses from Physics I and Lab, Physics II, Physics III and Lab, Physics IV, Mechanics I, Mathematical Physics I, Electricity and Magnetism I, Quantum Mechanics I, Statistical Physics I and Application Programming. For students in Natural Science, Engineering and Information Technology, two courses from Physics II, Physics IV, Mechanics I, Mathematical Physics I, Electricity and Magnetism I, Quantum Mechanics I, Statistical Physics I and Application Programming. 5) All students must take at least one laboratory course from Modern Physics Laboratory, Electronics Lab, Electromagnetism Lab, Optics Lab and Advanced Lab.

Faculty Members and Areas of Research Koh, Jae-Gui, Professor, Physics of Magnetism, (Ph.D,. Soongsil Univ. 1984) Lee, Tae-Hoon, Professor, Quantum Field Theory, (Ph.D,. SNU, 1988) Kim, Chang-Bae, Professor, Plasma Physics, (Ph.D., Princeton Univ. 1989) Kim, Jin-Min, Associate Professor, Statistical Physics, (Ph.D., Brown Univ, 1989) Kim, Hee-Sang, Associate Professor, Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, (Ph.D., Purdue Univ. 1994) Chung, Jin-Seok, Associate Professor, Solid State Physics Experiment, (Ph.D,. Purdue Univ., 1996) Yi, Hang-Mo, Assistant Professor, Condensed Matter Physics Theory, (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1996) Lee, Yun-Sang, Full-time lecturer, Solid State Spectroscopy, (Ph.D.. Seoul National Univ. 2001) Cheoun, Myung-Ki, Full-time lecturer, Theoretical Nuclear Physics, (Ph.D.. Tohoku [東北] University, Japan, 1991)

Calculus I, 3-3 This is a first course in calculus. Topics include basic concepts and techniques of differentiation and integration for elementary functions including transcendental functions, antidifferentation, fundamental theorems of calculus, the Riemann integral, and the polar coordinate system.

Physics

Physics I and Lab, 4 3 The basic laws of classical physics such as Newton's laws, the conservation of energy and momentum are taught in this course. Various experiments will provide a way for the students to understand the profound concepts behind these basic physical laws. Chemistry I and Lab, 4-3 This course introduces basic principles in chemistry about the structures of atoms and molecules, chemical reactions and reaction equations, gas laws, thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, and molecular orbital theory. The Chemistry Lab has a program to help students experience basic chemistry theories through simple experiments. Physics II, 2 2 Such physical concepts as equilibrium and elasticity, fluid dynamics, oscillations and waves, and thermodynamics are taught in this course with an emphasis on the application of these abstract concepts to everyday life. Calculus II, 3-3 This is a second course in calculus including vector analysis. Topics include sequences, infinite series, power series, inner products, cross products, vectors in Euclidean space, multiple integrals, and surface integrals. Physics III and Lab, 4-3 Basic laws of electricity and magnetism are taught, such as Coulomb's law, Gauss's law, Ohm's law, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, and Maxwell's equations. The lectures accompany experiments which promote empirical understanding

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of the laws. Chemistry II and Lab, 4-3 This course follows that of Chemistry I, and introduces the phases of matter, the chemical properties of solutions, acid bases, oxidation-reduction, equilibriums, and electrochemistry. The Chemistry Lab has a program introducing the basic experiments learned during lectures. Physics IV, 2-2 In this course wave equations of electromagnetic waves are derived from Maxwell's equations. Concepts in geometrical and wave optics are also taught. Mechanics I, 3-3 This course is for students familiar with calculus. Topics include elements of vector algebra, with an emphasis on point mass mechanics. Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, Free, driven, and damped harmonic motion, the noninertial reference system, gravitation and the central force problem, and the scattering problem are also taught. Modern Physics, 3-3 This course includes the following topics: the Michelson-Morley Experiment, Einstein's Postulates, the Lorentz Transformation, relativistic momentum and energy, Blackbody Radiation, the photoelectric effect, Compton Scattering, the Bohr Model, electron waves and Quantum Theory, the Electron Wave Function, the Uncertainty Principle, the Schrödinger Equation, a Particle in a Square Well, Quantum Theory of the Hydrogen Atom, Magnetic Moments and Electron Spin, the Spin-Orbit Effect, the Periodic Table, molecular bonding, energy levels and the Spectra of Diatomic Molecular, the structure of solids, Fermi Electron Gas, the Quantum Theory of Electrical Conduction, the Band Theory of Solids, Impurity Semiconductors, the properties of Nuclei, radioactivity, nuclear reactions, fission, fusion, the interaction of particles with matter, and elementary particles. Modern Physics Laboratory, 4-2 In this experimental course, students familiarize themselves with experimental techniques for studying the physical phenomena commonly observed at the atomic level and learn to analyze the results of experiments based on atomic physics theory. Millikan's oil drop experiment, the diffraction of electron beams, the measurement of Plank's constant, the Zeeman Effect, and ESR are a few examples among many experiments that constitute this course. Mathematical Physics I, 3-3 This course is the first half of the mathematical physics course that introduces basic mathematical techniques including power series, complex numbers, vector analysis, Fourier analysis, differential equations, etc., with an emphasis on their application in physics. Wave Phenomena, 3-3 Wave phenomena can be seen in a variety of natural phenomena like water waves, sounds, light, FM waves, earthquake waves, De Broglie waves, etc. The goal of this course is to obtain knowledge about wave phenomena and its application by studying interesting examples on basic concepts of waves and their relations. Topics include harmonic oscillations, normal modes from coupled harmonic oscillations, traveling waves, waves in a string, forced vibrations and resonance, reflection, interference, and the diffraction of waves. Future Plans, 1-1 In this course students are guided in conceptualizing and planning for their long-term career goals after their college

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College of Natural Sciences

education. Various resources will be provided such as presentations by Physics faculty members on topics ranging from their research interests to current science and technology trends and by alumni on their professional achievements after graduation and their current careers. Students are expected to make fairly well-defined career goals by successfully completing this course. Electricity and Magnetism I, 3-3 The topics covered in this course include the following: vector analysis, curvilinear coordinates, electrostatics, solutions of Laplace's equations in spherical and cylindrical coordinates, electrostatic energy, conductors, macroscopic and microscopic theory of dielectrics, and magnetostatics. Mechanics II, 3-3 This course is a continuation of Mechanics. Topics include: the many particle system, collisions, rigid body, impulse and collisions involving rigid bodies, principle axes, Eulers angles, precession, Gyroscope, Gyrocompass, Newtonian, Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian mechanics, coupled systems, the general theory of small oscillations, and vibrating strings. Mathematical Physics II, 3-3 This course is the second half of Mathematical Physics 1, and covers the calculus of variations, tensor analysis, special functions, complex functions, integral transformations, and so on. Electronics, 3-3 This course is designed to give students a fundamental knowledge of electronic properties in terms of direct current circuits, alternating currents, AC-circuit analysis, diode circuits, and semiconductor devices. Electronics Lab, 4-2 This course is designed to help students gain experience in electronic properties in terms of diodes, transistor, rectifiers, amplication, thyristors, and MOSFETS.

Physics

Quantum Mechanics I, 3-3 This course is an introduction to non-relativistic quantum mechanics, and provides students with the following: a historical review, quantum hypothesis, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, the Bohr atom, postulates, the eigenvalue and eigen function of operator, expectation value, commutator, the Schroedinger equation, the development of quantum theory, and applications. Statistical Physics I, 3-3 The course is designed to help students understand macroscopic quantities such as pressure, specific heat, and temperature starting from statistical viewpoints. The laws of thermodynamics and heat transfer, atomic interpretation in terms of kinetic theory, ideal gases, the Carnot cycle, refrigerators, heat engines, statistical and thermal definition of entropy, compressibility thermal expansion, Boltzmann statistics, Canonical Ensemble, etc., and the application to physical problems are also topics that are covered. Electricity and Magnetism II, 3 3 This course is a continuation of electricity and magnetism 1, and includes the following topoics: magnetostatics, magnetization, linear and nonlinear media, electrodynamics, Maxwell's equations, the applications of Maxwell's equations to ac circuits, filters, transmission lines, waveguides, and antennae, electromagnetic radiation, Lienard Wiechert potentials, and relativistic electrodynamics.

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Electromagnetism Lab, 4-2 This course is designed to help students gain experience in modern electromagnetic properties in terms of electrical and magnetic phenomena such as differential amplifiers, large signal amplifiers, hysteresis loop of soft and hard magnetic materials, and the magnetizing of magnetic material. Application Programming, 3-3 Students will learn in this course C-programming language, Mathematica, or Mathlab. Programming skills will be used to understand and solve physical problems, covering roots of equations, differentiations, integrations, etc. Quantum Mechanics II, 3-3 This course studies the further development of quantum theory and applications, angular momentum operators, energy levels of hydrogen atoms, spin operators, time-independent perturbation theory, the Zeeman effect, helium atoms, the time-dependent perturbation theory, and scattering theory. Statistical Physics II, 3-3 This course covers equi-partition theorem, micro canonical ensembles and grand canonical ensembles, quantum statistics (Fermi Dirac distribution and Bose-Einstein distribution), black body radiation, Debye approximation, phase transition, Clapeyron equation, Vander Waals equation, critical points, and so on. Optics, 3-3 This course studies physical optics that covers the basic properties of light like polarization, interference, and diffraction. Optics Lab, 4-2 This course includes experiments based on the basic properties of light and applications such as refraction, interference, polarization, and so on. Computer Simulation, 3-3 This course is for students who completed the Application Programming course or those who are familiar with computer programming languages. Topics include the least square fitting, extrapolations, differential equations, matrices, generating random numbers, and so on. Solid State Physics, 3-3 The aims of this course are to describe the structure of solids and to develop a variety of models with which to explain some of their properties. Electrical, thermal, and magnetic topics covered are periodic lattices and crystal structure, x ray diffraction of crystals, lattice vibration and thermal properties of crystals, the free electron model, and energy bands. Nuclear and Particle Physics, 3-3 In this combined course of Nuclear and Particle Physics, the electromagnetic interactions among fundamental particles such as electrons and protons and the weak interactions of beta decay are studied. The neutrino, frequently observed in weak interactions, and the symmetries of nature broken by the weak interactions, in addition to spatial, time reflections, and matter antimatter are topics that are studied in this course. The Weinberg-Salam model which unifies the electromagnetic and the weak interactions is introduced. Yukawa's theory of the strong interaction and the family of quarks which are the building blocks of nuclear particles are introduced. Grand Unification Theories (GUT) for understanding the four fundamental forces of nature-gravity, electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions-will be discussed.

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College of Natural Sciences

Advanced Lab, 4-2 This class will focus on experiments introducing measurement and fabrication skills for advanced physics experiments. Topics include the evaporation of thin film in vacuums, nitrogen lasers, the Faraday effect, and so on. Current Topics in Physics, 3-3 This course will include interesting special topics such as phase transitions, surface sciences, biophysics, fractals, chaos, and so on. Thesis Research in Physics I, 2-1 In this course the student chooses a topic of interest and carries out the research guided by a faculty advisor. Semiconductor Physics, 3-3 This course requires prior understanding of concepts in solid state physics such as the electron band theory. Covered topics include the effective mass of semiconductors, characteristics of silicon and germanium, the impurity effect, p-n junction, rectifier circuits, solar cells, photovoltage detectors, Schottky barriers, diodes and transistors, quantum wells and quantum dots, and current topics regarding semiconductors. New Material Physics, 3-3 Physical principles of the various types of advanced materials are taught in this course. The students are assumed to have a basic understanding of solid state physics such as the electron band theory. Covered topics include paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, Curie temperature, magnons, diamagnetism, Neel temperature, superconductivity, the Meissner effect, thermodynamic and optical properties of superconductivities, the isotope effect, Ginzburg-Landau theory, BCS theory, newly developed superconductors, ferroelectric materials, carbon nanotubes, and current topics in advanced materials.

Physics

Relativity and Cosmology, 3-3 This course is an introduction to the theory of relativity and cosmology, the special theory of relativity, tensor algebra, tensor calculus, 4-vector in Minkowski spacetime and curved space, the Maxwell tensor, energy-momentum tensor, curvature tensor, Einstein's equation for gravitation, black holes, perfect fluid, the cosmological principle, and the expanding universe. Thesis Research in Physics Ⅱ, 2-1 This course is a continuation of Thesis Research in Physics 1. Students are expected to prepare a poster summarizing their thesis research and make a public presentation.

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Chemistry Chemistry is the science of studying the transformation of atoms and molecules that are the elementary composition and materials of the universe. It also concerns the structures, status, and reactions of atoms and molecules. The scope of chemistry is so wide that it encloses both theoretical and experimental research and its applications. Chemistry can be divided into physical chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, analytical chemistry, and biochemistry according to the interests of each subject. The purpose of education in this department is to train students to acquire a solid knowledge of and experience in chemistry and devote themselves to the application fields of the environment, drug development, life sciences, materials, nano-techniques, superconductors, and so on. Phone: 02-820-0430; [email protected]; office hours: Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 12 p.m., 1 p.m - 5: 30 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. - 12 p.m Year

Classification

General required course

1st Semester Course Titles Chapel The Bible for Modern People Freshman Communicative English I Computer Practice I-Excel Course

Hours Points 3

3

3 1

1 1

Level

Notes Classification

General required course

1 General elective course Major compulsory course General required course General elective course 2

Major required course Major elective course

3

General required course Major required course Major elective course

4

Major elective course

(Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses) Calculus I Chemistry I and Lab Physics I and Lab Chapel Practical Reading & Writing

General elective course

4-6 3 4

3 3

4

3

3

(Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses)

2 2-4

Major compulsory course General required course General elective course Major Double Intermediate Major, required Minor course Intermediate Double Major

Physical Chemistry I

3

3

Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

4

2

Analytical Chemistry I Organic Chemistry I

3 3

3 Intermediate Minor 3 Intermediate Minor

Freshman Communicative English II Computer Practice II-PowerPoint Course

Hours Points 3

2

3 1

1 1

Level

Notes

Servant Leadership (32) 1 (Selection out of 8 Fields of General 4-6 Elective Courses) Calculus II Chemistry II and Lab

3 4

3 3

Physics II and Lab Chapel TOEIC 800

4

3

3

(Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses)

2 2-4

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

4

2 Intermediate Double Major

Organic Chemistry II

3

3 Intermediate

Organic Chemistry Laboratory II Analytical Chemistry II

4 3

2 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Physical Chemistry II

3

3 Intermediate Double major

Quantum Chemistry Solid & Surface Chemistry Physical Chemistry Laboratory II

3 3 4

3 Intermediate 3 Advanced 2 Intermediate

3 Intermediate

Molecular Structure Analysis Biochemistry II

3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Inorganic Chemistry II Modern Physical Chemistry Applied Inorganic Chemistry

3 3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Advanced 3 Advanced

Environmental Chemistry Special Topics of Chemistry II

3 3

3 3

Graduation Thesis II

1

1 Intermediate

Major elective course General required course

Chapel Double

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory Physical Chemistry Laboratory I Organic Synthesis

4 4 3

Biochemistry I Inorganic Chemistry I

3 3

Physical Chemistry III Spectroscopy Instrumental Analysis

3 3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Advanced 3 Advanced

Physical Organic Chemistry Special Topics of Chemistry I

3 3

3 3

Graduation Thesis I

1

1 Intermediate



2nd Semester Course Titles Chapel Reading & Writing

2 Intermediate Major Double 2 Intermediate Major Major 3 Intermediate elective course 3 Intermediate

Advanced Advanced

Major elective course

Chapel

Advanced Advanced

Notes: 1) General elective courses should be completed over 15 credits, whose areas should spread over more than five areas including the foreign languages area out of eight areas. 2) A candidate for a double major in Chemistry is required to obtain at least 36 credits of major courses, including 14 credits of required courses for

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a double major, as listed in the chart above. Students also must complete a minimum of nine credits of advanced major coursework. 3) A minor candidate must complete at least 21 credits of major courses, including nine credits of required courses for a minor, as listed in the chart above. 4) Students majoring in Chemistry only must obtain at least 54 credits of major courses, including a minimum of 15 credits of advanced major courses. (The credits of major compulsory courses are not included in the credits of major courses.)

Faculty Members and Areas of Research Nam, Jeong-E, Professor, Organic Chemistry, (Ph.D., McGill Univ. 1978) Paek, Kyung-Soo, Professor, Organic Chemistry, (Ph.D.,Univ. of California at L.A. 1988) Shin, Kuan-Soo, Professor, Physical Chemistry, (Ph.D., Univ. of Texas at Austin, 1990) Chun, Keun-Ho, Professor, Organic Chemistry, (Ph.D., Univ. of California at L.A. 1992) Kang, Wee-Kyung, Associate Professor, Physical Chemistry, (Ph.D., KAIST, 1994) Joo, Sang-Woo, Assistant Professor, Material, Sensor, (Ph.D., Chicago Univ. 1996) Kim, Ja-Heon, Assistant Professor, Inorganic Chemistry, (Ph.D., Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, 1996)

Calculus I, 3-3 This is a first course in calculus. Topics include basic concepts and techniques of differentiation and integration for elementary functions including transcendental functions, antidifferentation, fundamental theorems of calculus, the Riemann integral, and the polar coordinate system. Chemistry I and Lab, 4-3 This course introduces basic principles in chemistry about the structures of atoms and molecules, chemical reactions and reaction equations, gas laws, thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, and molecular orbital theory. The Chemistry Lab has a program to help students experience basic chemistry theories through simple experiments.

Chemistry

Physics I and Lab, 4-3 The basic laws of classical physics such as Newton's laws, the conservation of energy and momentum are taught in this course. Various experiments will provide a way for the students to understand the profound concepts behind these basic physical laws. Calculus II, 3-3 This is a second course in calculus including vector analysis. Topics include sequences, infinite series, power series, inner products, cross products, vectors in Euclidean space, multiple integrals, and surface integrals. Chemistry II and Lab, 4-3 This course follows that of Chemistry I, and introduces the phases of matter, the chemical properties of solutions, acid bases, oxidation-reduction, equilibriums, and electrochemistry. The Chemistry Lab has a program introducing the basic experiments learned during lectures. Physics II and Lab, 4-3 Basic laws of electricity and magnetism are taught, such as Coulomb's law, Gauss's law, Ohm's law, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, and Maxwell's equations. The lectures accompany experiments which promote empirical understanding of the laws. Physical Chemistry I, 3-3 This course is an introduction to the thermodynamic 1st, 2nd, and 3rd laws on heat transformation to help students understand the theoretical concepts of chemical change.

141

Organic Chemistry Laboratory I, 4-2 In this course the methods for separation, purification, and analysis of organic compounds will be introduced. Some basic and simple organic reactions will also be carried out during this course. The knowledge and techniques will be practiced for the identification of natural compounds and synthetic products. Analytical Chemistry I, 3-3 This course covers the basic principles of wet chemistry related to the quantitative and qualitative analysis of inorganic compounds. Organic Chemistry I, 3-3 This course deals with nomenclature, chemical bonding, isomerism, and the stereochemistry of organic compounds which determine the chemical reactivities and physical properties of organic compounds. Organic reactions are explained on the basis of their reaction mechanisms for better understanding by students. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, 4-2 This is a one-term course in analytical chemistry laboratory techniques emphasizing the fundamental quantitative and physical principles of analytical chemistry together with data analysis. Organic Chemistry II, 3-3 The knowledge and understanding provided in Organic Chemistry 1 is a prerequisite for this course. The reactions of carbonyl compounds, the reactions and synthesis of acid derivatives, and carbon nucleophiles (enolates) will be studied. The formation of large molecules through carbon-carbon bond formation, photochemistry (radicals), and pericyclic reactions will also be included in this course. Organic Chemistry Laboratory II, 4-2 More complicated organic reactions and multi-step syntheses will be carried out in this course. The methods and techniques acquired during the preceding course (Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1) will be applied. Analytical Chemistry II, 3-3 This course involves the second stage of learning the basic principles in wet chemistry related to the quantitative and qualitative analysis of inorganic compounds. Physical Chemistry II, 3-3 This course is a continuation of Physical Chemistry 1, focusing on chemical equilibrium and chemical kinetics. Students will examine the fundamental concepts and the applications of chemical equilibrium, equilibrium electrochemistry, molecules in motion, the rates of chemical reactions, and the kinetics of complex reactions. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, 4-2 This course involves the study of the syntheses and characterizations of various inorganic compounds or materials. Physical Chemistry Laboratory I, 4-2 This laboratory course features experiments concerning the fundamental physical nature of chemical phenomena. Typical experiments include heat of combustion, viscosity, ionic strength, surface tension, phase rule, conductivity, refractivity, and chemical kinetics.

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Organic Synthesis, 3-3 This course provides students with an introduction to fundamental concepts such as chemical bonding, redox states, acid and base, the organic reaction mechanism, and stereochemistry. This will be followed by an intensive focus on functional group synthesis, carbon-carbon bond formations, free radical reactions, and the retrosynthetic strategy for organic synthesis. Biochemistry I, 3-3 As one part of life science, biochemistry has tried to understand bio-phenomena at the molecular level. In this course, structures and chemical or bio properties of the major biomolecules (protein, nucleotide, carbohydrate, and lipid) are introduced. Inorganic Chemistry I, 3-3 This course promotes the understanding of the properties of inorganic materials, atomic and molecular structures, the nature of chemical bonds, molecular orbital theory, and crystal and ligand field theory. Physical Chemistry III, 3-3 This course is a continuation of Physical Chemistry 1 and 2, focusing on the microscopic properties and statistical thermodynamics. Students will examine the basic principles of quantum theory, the atomic and molecular structures, and spectra. The concepts and machinery of statistical thermodynamics will also be discussed. Quantum Chemistry, 3-3 This course will cover the historical background of quantum theory, Bohr's model of hydrogen atom, the interpretation of atomic spectra, Schrödinger's equation, the uncertainty principle, a solution to the Schrödinger equation in a simple system, hydrogen atomic orbitals, chemical bonds, and molecular orbitals.

Chemistry

Solid & Surface Chemistry, 3-3 The forces of attraction between matter will be explained in this course. Surface and physicochemical property changes at interfaces will be focused on in particular. The classification of solid matter based on modern technological innovations and an understanding of the physicochemical properties and surface phenomena of solids will also be discussed in this course. Physical Chemistry Laboratory II, 4-2 This is a laboratory course featuring advanced experiments concerning the fundamental physical nature of chemical phenomena. This course is a continuation of Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1. Molecular Structure Analysis, 3-3 The fundamental concepts of spectroscopic analytical methods such as 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MASS, FT-IR, and UV VIS spectroscopies will be introduced in this course as tools for molecular structure and conformation analyses. Especially the techniques for the purification of organic compounds, the spectroscopic characteristics of functional groups and stereochemistry, and the identification of carbon-carbon connectivity will be introduced. Finally, the practice of the structural identification of unknown organic compound will be discussed. Biochemistry II, 3-3 This course follows Biochemistry I, and introduces the mechanisms and regulations of DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Also metabolism, genetic engineering, and special topics in current research are also discussed.

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Inorganic Chemistry II, 3-3 This course follows Inorganic Chemistry 1, and covers topics on the structures, properties, and reactions of transition metal complexes and various metal and non-metal compounds. Spectroscopy, 3-3 The motions of electron and nuclei will be described in this course on the basis of classical mechanics and quantum chemistry. In particular, molecular motions and physicochemical properties resulting from structural analysis will be studied. The principles and apparatus of various spectroscopic instruments such as NMR, UV, Raman, and microwave will be introduced. Instrumental Analysis, 3-3 This course will study the principles and applications of chromatography, electrochemical analysis, and spectroscopic methods to chemical problems concerning structures and reactions. Physical Organic Chemistry, 3-3 Covalent bonds, hybridization, bond energy, resonance phenomena, stereochemistry, and organic compounds will be examined in this course in relation to their reactivities, reaction mechanisms, and prospective products. Reaction intermediates and transition states will also be discussed. Special Topics of Chemistry I, 3-3 Rapidly changing and developing modern chemistry will be studied. Topics not available in the text will be introduced and state-of-art techniques will be introduced during the lectures. Graduation Thesis I, 1-1 Students in this course are supposed to choose their thesis subjects. For the determination of the contents and target of the thesis work, they are required to search pertinent research articles and to understand the research trends. Especially, students are expected to learn the basic theories and experimental methods for the completion of their thesis. Modern Physical Chemistry, 3-3 This lecture is designed to give seniors a unified treatment of physical chemistry on an advanced level. Topics include molecular spectroscopy, computational chemistry, statistical mechanics, nano materials, and environmental chemistry. Applied Inorganic Chemistry, 3-3 This course focuses on the important compounds that are being studied by current research works. The related fields that will be studied are the electronic spectra of coordination compounds, organometallic chemistry, catalysis, solid state chemistry, and bioinorganic chemistry. Environmental Chemistry, 3-3 Pollutions in the atmosphere, water, and earth as well as pollution originating from organic compounds (pesticides, detergents, and plastics), metals, and radioactive compounds will be examined in this course. Pollution history, chemistry, and the recognition of their effects on human health and well being in the short and long term will be studied. The use of chemicals will be evaluated in their achievements in improving the quality of life as well as contaminating the environment. Contaminants, the appropriate usage of chemicals, and methods for the removal of residual contaminants will also be studied.

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College of Natural Sciences

Special Topics of Chemistry II, 3-3 Insufficient materials covered in the previous texts from all areas of chemistry including physical, organic, inorganic, analytical, life science, and polymer chemistry will be selected in this course. Advanced chemistry topics will also be introduced during the lectures. Graduation Thesis II, 1-1 This course is a continuation of Graduation Thesis 1. Students will do their own research under the direction of supervising professors. The thesis is to be finished and evaluated by a committee, the members of which are the professors in the Chemistry Department.

Chemistry 145

Statistics and Actuarial Science Statistics is the comprehensive solution of collecting, summarizing and analyzing information to increase the competitive advantage of making better decisions. And the actuarial science deals with the mathematical and statistical aspects of insurance as a special application of statistics. Phone: 02-820-0440; [email protected]; office hours: Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 12 p.m., 1 p.m. - 6 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Year

Classification

General required course

1st Semester Course Titles Chapel The Bible for Modern People Freshman Communicative English I Computer Practice I-Excel Course

Hours Points 3 3 1

Level

3 1 1

Notes Classification

General required course

1 General elective course Major compulsory course

2

General required course General elective course Major required course Major elective course General required course

3

4

Major elective course

Major elective course

General elective course

(Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses) Statistics Calculus1

3 3

3 3

Computer Programming and Practices Chapel

4

3

Practical Reading & Writing (Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses)

3

2

Mathematical Statistics 1

3

3

Regression Analysis 1 Numerical Analysis Financial Mathematics

3 3 3

3 3 3

Major compulsory course General required course General elective course Major Intermediate Double required course Intermediate Double Minor Major Intermediate elective course Intermediate General required course

Chapel Statistical Inference Experimental Design

3 3

3 3 Intermediate

Sampling Computing 2 Statistical Computing 2

3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Advanced

Life Actuarial Mathematics 2 Principles of Insurance 2 Analysis of Categorical Data

3 3 3

3 Advanced 3 Intermediate 3 Advanced

Time Series Analysis Quality Control Non-life Actuarial Mathematics 2

3 3 3

3 Advanced 3 Intermediate 3 Advanced

Seminar in Actuarial Science 2

1

1

Major elective course

Major elective course

2nd Semester Course Titles Chapel

Hours Points

Level

Notes

3 2 Reading & Writing (32) 1 Servant Leadership 1 Freshman Communicative English II 3 1

1

3 3

3 3

Mathematics for Statistics Chapel

3

3

TOEIC 800 (Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses)

3

2

Mathematical Statistics 2

3

3 Intermediate

Regression Analysis 2 Statistical Computing 1 Principle of Insurance 1

3 3 3

3 Intermediate Double Minor 3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Life Actuarial Mathematics 1

3

3 Intermediate

Multivariate Analysis Simulation

3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Advanced

Operations Research Non-life Actuarial Mathematics 1

3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Seminar in Actuarial Science 1

1

1 Intermediate

Stochastic Processes

3

3

Advanced

Decision Analysis Data Mining Special Topics in Actuarial Science

3 3 3

3 3 3

Advanced Advanced Advanced

Computer Practice II-PowerPoint Course (Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses) Statistical Methods Calculus 2

Chapel

Advanced

※Notes: 1) General division elective courses should be completed over 15 credits, whose areas should spread over more than five areas including the foreign languages area out of eight areas. 2) A candidate for a double major in Statistics & Actuarial Science is required to obtain at least 36 credits of major courses (all major compulsory courses must be taken), including nine credits of required courses for a double major, as listed in the chart above. 3) A minor candidate must complete at least 21 credits of major courses, including nine credits of required courses for a minor, as listed in the chart above.

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Faculty Members and Areas of Research College of Natural Sciences

Lee, Yoon-Oh, Professor, Experimental Design, (Ph.D., SNU, 1984) Lee, Jung-Jin, Professor, Time Series Analysis, Multivariate Analysis, Operations Research, (Ph.D., Case Western Reserve Univ., 1986) Kang, Gunseog, Professor, Statistical Computing, Nonlinear Model, (Ph.D., Univ. of Wisconsin/Madison, 1988) Kim, Ji-Hyun, Professor, Survival Analysis, (Ph.D., Florida State Univ., 1990) Kim, Sung-Chul, Professor, Decision Analysis, Bayesian Analysis, (Ph.D., Univ. of California, Berkeley, 1988) Lee, Chang-Soo, Professor, Actuarial Science, Time Series Analysis, (Ph.D., Univ. of Iowa 1991) Lee Hangsuck, Assistant Professor, Actuarial Science, Financial Engineering, (Ph.D., Univ. of Iowa, 2002)

Statistics, 3-3 This course is a foundation course and introduces descriptive statistics, probability, inference and testing, regression, experimental designs and categorical data analysis. Calculus I, 3-3 This course is the first part of the mathematical foundation for the program. Topics include limits and derivatives of functions, integrals and methods of integration, polar coordinates, and various functional forms. Computer Programming and Practices, 4-3 In this course students will study programming languages such as C and VBA for computer programming. Practice is emphasized to solve problems.

Statistics and Actuarial Science

Statistical Methods, 3-3 This is the follow-up course of Statistics. Various methods of statistics are applied and more applications such as non parametric methods, quality control, and decision analysis are introduced. Calculus II, 3-3 This course is the second part of the mathematical foundation for the program. Topics include sequences and series, power series, vectors, analytic geometry, and multiple integration. Mathematics for Statistics, 3-3 Topics regarding linear algebra such as vector space, matrices, matrix inverse, characteristic equations, the system of linear equations and matrix algebra will be studied in this course. The other mathematical foundation for statistics will also be covered in this course. Mathematical Statistics I, 3-3 The purpose of this course is to give students theoretical backgrounds that underlie much of statistical methodologies. This is the first part of a three-course series. Topics include combinatorial analysis, conditional probability, independence, random variable, expectation, variance, covariance, special discrete and continuous distributions, and joint, marginal, and conditional distributions. Regression Analysis I, 3-3 In this course regression analysis is covered as a flexible statistical problem-solving methodology. The focus is on observational data. Topics include simple linear regression, matrix review, multiple linear regression, variable selection, prediction, multicollinearity, and model diagnostics. Emphasis is also on the use of computers.

147

Numerical Analysis, 3-3 In this course, computational algorithms for solving various mathematical and statistical problems are covered. Topics include interpolation by polynomial, determinants, the solution of nonlinear/linear equations, approximation, differentiation and integration, and the solution of differential equations. Financial Mathematics, 3-3 In this course theories and methodologies in actuarial mathematics are covered. Topics included are interest theory, survival distribution models, experienced life tables, the calculation of premiums, pension mathematics, the construction of rating structures, experience rating, loss reserving, reinsurance mathematics, and risk theory. Mathematical Statistics II, 3-3 As the second course of mathematical statistics, this course covers the distributions of the functions of random variables, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem, as well as likelihood functions and sufficiency. Estimation theory including unbiasedness, complete sufficient statistics, Lehmann-Scheffe and Rao Blackwell theorems and various types of estimators are also introduced. Regression Analysis II, 3-3 This course is a follow-up of Regression Analysis 1. Emphasis is on the extension of multiple regression, variable selection, the design of experiments, the use of regression packages, and the response surface method. Statistical Computing I, 3-3 In this course selected topics in statistical computing including basic numerical aspects, iterative statistical methods, principles of graphical analysis, simulation and Monte Carlo methods, the generation of random variables, stochastic modeling, importance sampling, numerical and Monte Carlo integration are covered. Also discussed are numerical linear algebra (linear solvers, matrix factorizations, and eigenvalue problems) and computing methods for regression analysis and optimization problems. Principles of Insurance I, 3-3 In this course the following topics are covered: evaluation of life, health, retirement, property, and liability exposures to loss and the analysis of the methods for managing these risks. Risk management and insurance techniques for dealing with potential losses to individuals and organizations, along with the operations of insurance companies are other topics that are covered. Life Actuarial Mathematics I, 3-3 This course is an introduction to life insurance mathematics based on a probabilistic approach. Major topics include life insurance, annuities, benefit premiums, and reserves. This is a course for all students pursuing an actuarial career. A basic knowledge of the theory of interest is assumed. Statistical Inference, 3-3 As the last course of mathematical statistics, this course covers testing statistical hypotheses, Bayesian approaches to point estimation, and important applications, including the analysis of variance and regression. In this course the theory of hypothesis testing is studied, which includes tests significance levels, power, the Neyman-Pearson lemma, uniformly most powerful unbiased tests, likelihood ratio tests, and the associated large sample theory, goodness of fit tests, and tests in contingency tables. Experimental Design, 3-3 In this course, experimental design as a method for finding the optimal conditions of an experiment is investigated. Topics include completely randomized, randomized block, factorial, nested, Latin squares, split-plot, and incomplete block designs. Fractional factorial design and response surface procedure are also introduced.

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Sampling Theory, 3-3 Design principles pertaining to the planning and execution of a sample survey are discussed in this course. Other topics discussed: sampling error and nonsampling error, simple random, stratified random, systematic, and one-and two-stage cluster sampling designs. Emphasis in this course will be placed on statistical considerations in the analysis of sample survey data. A class project on the design and execution of an actual sample survey will be carried out. Statistical Computing II, 3-3 Statistical analysis methods are practiced in this course with a statistical package such as R. Whiling learning data analysis techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the graphical representation of statistical information and programming using the computer language of the statistical package. Also simulation problems are covered in depth. Life Actuarial Mathematics II, 3-3 This course is a continuation of Life Actuarial Mathematics I. Development is based on a probabilistic approach to life insurance models. Major topics in this course include benefit premiums, reserves, insurance models including expenses, and multi-life / multiple-decrement models. This is a course for all students pursuing an actuarial career. Principles of Insurance II, 3-3 In this course topics in Insurance law are covered. Special emphasis is given to preparation for the actuarial examination.

Statistics and Actuarial Science

Multivariate Analysis, 3-3 The extension of univariate statistical techniques to multivariate analysis is discussed in this course. Multivariate normal distribution, Hotelling's T-square distribution, Wishart distribution and its application to test the hypothesis in mean vectors and covariance matrix will be introduced in this course. Principal component analysis, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, and cluster analysis are also discussed. Simulation, 3-3 Computer simulation techniques to solve complicated real world problems are introduced in this course. Monte Carlo simulation and system simulation techniques are studied by using simulation packages. Operations Research, 3-3 This course deals with the mathematical aspects of management and focuses on mathematical modeling and the analyses of management science. The first part of the course is Linear Programming. Modeling, Simplex algorithms, duality and the sensitivity of LP are also studied. The second part involves selected topics of mathematical programming and the probabilistic modeling of management problems. Topics include nonlinear programming, dynamic programming, game theory, inventory management, Markov chains, and Monte Carlo methods. Non-Life Actuarial Mathematics I, 3-3 In this course the following topics are covered: models for loss severity, parametric models, the effect of policy modifications, and tail behavior. Also covered: models for loss frequency (a, b, 0) models, (a, b, 1) models, mixed Poisson models, and compound Poisson models, aggregate claims models, risk theory, and statistical inference for loss models. Seminar in Actuarial Science I, 1-1 This course is designed to aid students pursuing an actuarial career. Current actuarial issues will be presented and discussed. In addition, this course is useful in their preparation for domestic or international actuarial exams. Analysis of Categorical Data, 3-3 Analysis of categorical data which are often used in social science and medical science are discussed in this course. Topics include the analysis of cross tables, logistic regression, the log linear model, and the generalized linear model.

149

Time Series Analysis, 3-3 Topics in stationary time series models and non-stationary time series models will be discussed in this course. The identification of a model by autocorrelation analysis, the estimation of AR, MA, ARMA, and ARIMA models and the checking validation of models are also discussed. Quality Control, 3-3 Statistical techniques to improve the quality of products are discussed in this course. Topics include statistical process control, control charts for variables and attributes, CUSUM and EWMA, multivariate quality control, process capability, specifications and tolerances, gage capability studies, and acceptance sampling by attributes and variables. Non-Life Actuarial Mathematics II, 3-3 In this course part of following topics will be covered: basics of property/casualty insurance, ratemaking in property/casualty insurance, loss reserving, risk classification, individual risk rating, credibility theory, reinsurance, and expense issues. Seminar in Actuarial Science II, 1-1 This course is designed to aid students pursuing an actuarial career. Current actuarial issues will be presented and discussed. In addition, this course is useful in their preparation for domestic or international actuarial exams. Stochastic Processes, 3-3 Topics in Bernoulli process, Poisson process, random walk, Markov chain, and queuing theory will be introduced in this class. Decision Analysis, 3-3 Various types of decision making processes will be studied in this course. Decision tables, decision trees, influence diagrams, and utility functions are also discussed. Bayesian decision theory and analytic hierarchy processes are also introduced. Data Mining, 3-3 Data mining is the science of extracting useful information from large data sets or databases. Using E-Miner of SAS or Clementine of SPSS, various techniques of data mining are practiced in this course with real data sets. Methods covered are logistic regression, classification and regression trees, the association rule, cluster analysis, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. Methods for data exploration and modification, and model assessment methods are also discussed. Special Topics in Actuarial Science, 3-3 This course covers special topics in actuarial science. Special topics may cover pension mathematics or graduation theory, Asset/Liability management, reinsurance, and underwriting risks. ※

Courses for Interdisciplinary Program

Mathematical Foundation for Finance This course presents some basics of calculus, matrix algebra, probability, numerical analysis, and optimization techniques in the context of financial world applications. Basic computing with Mathematic or Excel/VBA is integrated into the development, and students use such tools to work on their projects. There are no computing prerequisites for this course. Students learn computing as the course goes on.

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College of Natural Sciences

Bioinformatics and Life Science Bioinformatics is a field of science which began to handle the vast amount of information from genomics, proteomics, and related biological sciences. It is a typical interdisciplinary science of biotechnology and information technology, requiring the knowledge of bioscience, computational science, and statistics. In the Department of Bioinformatics and Life Science, the students will learn the principles and experimental techniques of bioscience, analytical techniques, and the utilization of biological information using computation and statistics, the construction of databases, and new drug designs. The educational goal is to foster talented men and women who will contribute to national prosperity and human welfare through the acquired knowledge. Phone: 02-820-0450; [email protected]; office hours: Monday - Friday 9 a.m. - 12 p.m., 1 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. Year

Classification

General required course

1st Semester Course Titles Chapel

Hours Points

The Bible for Modern People Freshman Communicative English I

3 3

3 1

Computer Practice I-Excel Course

1

1

Level

Notes Classification

General required course

1 General elective course

2

General required course General elective course Major required course Major elective course General required course Major required course

3 Major elective course

4

Major elective course

Elective Courses) Calculus I

3

3

General Biology I and Lab Chemistry and Lab Chapel

4 4

3 3

Practical Reading & Writing (Selection out of 8 Fields of General

3

2

Microbiology and Lab

4

3

Introduction to Bioinformatics Organic Chemistry and Lab

3 4

3 3

Computer Programming and Lab I

4

3

Elective Courses)

Major compulsory course General required course General elective course Major Intermediate Minor required course Intermediate Double Minor Major Intermediate elective course Intermediate

Chapel Molecular Biology Lab

4

2 Intermediate

Introduction to Cheminformatics Biostatistics I Structural Biology

3 3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Biochemistry II Molecular Biology

3 3

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Undergraduate Thesis I Programming in Bioinformatics Pharmacology

4 3 3

2 3 3

Advanced Advanced Advanced

Database Design Molecular Genetics

3 3

3 3

Advanced Advanced

General required course Major required course Major elective course

Major elective course

Reading & Writing Freshman Communicative English II

Hours Points 3 3

Level

Notes

2 1

Computer Practice II-PowerPoint Course 1 1 (32) 1 Servant Leadership (Selection out of 8 Fields of General Elective Courses) Calculus II

3

3

General Biology II and Lab Physics and Lab Chapel

4 4

3 3

TOEIC 800 (Selection out of 8 Fields of General

3

2

Biochemistry Lab

4

2 Intermediate

Biochemistry I Physical Chemistry and Lab

3 4

3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Computer Programming and Lab II Discrete Mathematics

4

3 Intermediate

Bioinformatics and Life Science

Major compulsory course

General elective course

(Selection out of 8 Fields of General

2nd Semester Course Titles Chapel

Elective Courses)

Chapel Instrumental Analysis Lab

4

2 Intermediate

Computational Molecular Biology and Lab Cell Biology Biostatistics II

4 3 3

3 Advanced Minor 3 Intermediate 3 Intermediate

Biophysics

3

3 Intermediate

Undergraduate Thesis II Cheminformatics and Lab Functional Genomics

4 4 3

2 3 3

Advanced Advanced Advanced

Special Topics in Bioinformatics

3

3

Advanced

※ Notes: 1) General elective courses should be completed over 15 credits, whose areas should spread over more than five areas including the foreign languages area out of eight areas. 2) A candidate for a double major in Bioinformatics & Life Science is required to obtain at least 36 credits of major courses (all major compulsory courses must be taken). 3) A minor candidate must complete at least 21 credits of major courses, including nine credits of required courses for a minor, as listed in the chart above.

151

Faculty Members and Areas of Research Lim, Dongbin, Professor, Molecular Genetics, (Ph.D., New York Univ., 1989) Shin, Hang-Cheol, Associate Professor, Protein Biochemistry, (Ph.D., Univ. of Sydney, 1991) Lee, Julian, Assistant Professor, Biophysics, Bioinformatics, (Ph.D., Brown Univ., 1994) Cho, Kwang-Hwi, Assistant Professor, Cheminformatics, (Ph.D., Cornell Univ., 2001) Kim, Sangsoo, Assistant Professor, Genome Informatics, (Ph.D., Iowa State Univ., 1986) Bahn, Yong-Sun, Full-time lecturer, Cell Biology, (PhD., Ohio State Univ., 2003)

Calculus I, 3-3 This is the first course in calculus. Topics include basic concepts and techniques of differentiation and integration for elementary functions including transcendental functions, antidifferentation, fundamental theorems of calculus, the Riemann integral, and the polar coordinate system. General Biology I and Lab, 4-3 Basic principles of biology are introduced in this course. The topics include the chemical basis of life, cellular components, the structure and function of cells, metabolism and energy transformation, genetic materials, gene expression, cell division, development, and its regulation, and the utilization of genes. Related experiments are practiced in the lab. Chemistry and Lab, 4-3 Basic principles of chemistry are introduced in this course. Topics covered are gas, the electronic structure of molecules, bonds, and reaction in liquids. Calculus II, 3-3 This is the second course in calculus including vector analysis. Topics include sequences, infinite series, power series, inner products, cross products, vectors in Euclidean space, multiple integrals, and surface integrals. General Biology II and Lab, 4-3 General Biology II and Lab is a course focusing on the structure, function, and physiology of animals with an emphasis on the human body. The overall body plan of the animal kingdom will be presented in the beginning and each organ system will be reviewed. Primary instructional methods are lectured with slides, discussion, and the laboratory including the anatomy of a mouse. Physics and Lab, 4-3 Basic laws of classical physics are introduced in this course, and their applications are explained. Concepts in modern physics are also briefly introduced. The students are instructed to deepen their insights into the fundamental concepts through lab experiments. Microbiology and Lab, 4-3 Microbial structure and function, the classification and ecology of microorganisms, microbial genetics and its application in industry will be studied in this course. The laboratory will include the isolation and pure culture of microorganisms from the environment, the isolation of bacteriophage, and some molecular techniques to manipulate DNA in vitro. Introduction to Bioinformatics, 3-3 This course is a brief introduction to the scope, methodologies, tools, and application of bioinformatics. It covers genomic, proteomic, cheminformatic, and metabolomic information.

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College of Natural Sciences

Organic Chemistry and Lab, 4-3 This course deals with nomenclature, chemical bonding, isomerism, and the stereochemistry of organic compounds which determine the chemical reactivities and physical properties of organic compounds. Organic reactions are explained on the basis of their reaction mechanisms for better understanding for students. Experimental methods for separation, purification, and analysis of organic compounds are practiced in the lab. Some basic and simple organic reactions will also be carried out during this course. Computer Programming and Lab I, 4-3 The students in this course are exposed to a programming language at an elementary level, with the application to bioinformatics in mind. They are also instructed to improve their skills by hands on lab practice. Biochemistry Lab, 4-2 The basic experimental techniques in biochemistry, such as isolation and purification of cellular components and biomolecules, purification and the characterization of enzymes, etc., are introduced and practiced in the lab. Biochemistry I, 3-3 The cells, biological macromolecules, and molecular logic of life are introduced in this course. The topics covered are the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzyme reactions, biological membranes, and transport. Physical Chemistry and Lab, 4-3 In this course general topics of physical chemistry are introduced including thermodynamics, rate law, and some parts of statistical mechanics. In the lab, molecular modeling software is introduced to teach computational drug discovery.

Bioinformatics and Life Science

Computer Programming and Lab II, 4-3 The purpose of this course is to provide students with a middle-level programming language skill, which can be applied to bioinformatics research. The students are instructed to improve their skills by hands on lab practice.

Discrete Mathematics, 3-3 Basic concepts in discrete mathematics are introduced, with a focus on applications to bioinformatics problems. The topics covered include mathematics logic, set relations, functions, algebraic systems, lattice, and Boolean algebra. Molecular Biology Lab, 4-2 Students are expected to learn various recombinant DNA techniques through this laboratory course. They will be given a metagenomic library constructed in a fosmid vector, and will be asked to isolate, subclone, characterize, and sequence a specific gene. The obtained DNA sequence will be analyzed with various bioinformatic tools and the final results will be presented in a paper and orally. Introduction to Cheminformatics, 3-3 Computational methods for molecular modeling are introduced in this course. The topics covered are empirical force fields, ab initio MO calculations, molecular representation, and computer simulation. Biostatistics I, 3-3 Basics concepts and theories in statistics are introduced in this course, and various applications to bioinformatics, biology, and medical science are explained.

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Structural Biology, 3-3 The structure of biological macromolecules and their functional relationship are covered in this course. The main topics covered are the structural understanding of protein functions, nucleic acid functions, protein-protein interaction, protein nucleic acid interaction, and the reaction mechanism of enzymes. Biochemistry II, 3-3 The energetics of life and the flow of genetic information are introduced in this course. The topics covered are the metabolism and biosynthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleic acids, and the hormonal regulation of these processes. Also covered are the structure of genes, the flow and regulation of genetic information, and recombinant DNA technology. Molecular Biology, 3-3 This course is designed to understand biological phenomena at the molecular level. The course will review the structure and function of nucleic acids including the transcription of genes, mRNA splicing, and mRNA translation. The regulation of gene expression at various levels will also be emphasized. Instrumental Analysis Lab, 4-2 In this course the basics of instruments are introduced and analytical methods using UV-VIS spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy, LC, CD-ORD, and GC / MS, are practiced. Computational Molecular Biology and Lab, 4-3 Computational methods for biology are introduced in this course. Topics covered are database handling, sequence alignment, and machine learning such as HMM and ANN. Some programming skills are required to do the homework. Cell Biology, 3-3 This course is a detailed study of the structure and function of the cell. The major concern of the course is the eukaryotic cell, but some unique aspects of prokaryotes will be discussed. Protein traffic inside the cell, signal transduction, and the development and differentiation of the embryo will be reviewed in detail. Biostatistics II, 3-3 Advanced topics in biostatistics, such as multiple linear regression, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Bayesian inference, are introduced in this course. The application of statistical methodology to various problems such as clinical experiments on new drugs or treatments, gene analysis, is explained. Biophysics, 3-3 The physical properties and analytical methods concerning biomolecules and physiological phenomena are introduced in this course. The main topics covered are thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, transport, sedimentation, spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and so on. Undergraduate Thesis I, 4-2 In this course the student decides the topic for an undergraduate thesis by consulting his or her advisor and carrying out the research. Programming in Bioinformatics, 3-3 In this course various algorithms to be applied in bioinformatics are introduced, such as pattern recognition, local minimization and global optimization, and clustering. The students are trained to improve their skills by extensive programming experiences.

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College of Natural Sciences

Pharmacology, 3-3 The physico-chemical properties of pharmaceuticals and their physiological actions are introduced in this course. Also included are numerous illustrations and diagrams to help students acquire a better understanding of the physicochemical properties, biological functions, molecular structures, and ADME/T (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Elimination, and Toxicity) of many important drugs. Database Design, 3-3 In this course the basics of database structure are studied. Also, how to design, construct, and use biological databases is the goal of the course. Some practical tutorials are included with a special emphasis on biological relevance. Molecular Genetics, 3-3 The basic principles governing continuity and variation of life are introduced in this course. The main topics include classical genetics, the physical and chemical basis of heredity, the structure and function of genes, mutation and its genetic function, and the molecular basis of recombination. Undergraduate Thesis II, 4-2 In this course the student decides the topic for a undergraduate thesis by consulting his or her advisor and carrying out the research.

Bioinformatics and Life Science

Cheminformatics and Lab, 4-3 Cheminformatics is becoming more important in the commercial application of numerous "-omics." Students will learn in this course the most essential concepts and tools for cheminformatics such as chemical databases, data format, design, creation, management, retrieval, analysis, visualization, and the use of chemical information. Basic or advanced computer programming skills are recommended. Functional Genomics, 3-3 This course is an introduction to various biological and biochemical methods for the cataloging of a global view of genomic data. Also included is the comparison of inter-species differences and individual variations leading to differences in biological activity. The course covers the following topics: an introduction to genomics and DNA sequencing, cDNA library construction, transcriptomics and gene expression analysis, proteomics and its analysis, comparative genomics and evolutionary analysis, and bioinformatics analysis. Special Topics in Bioinformatics, 3-3 Tremendous advancement in the bioinformatics area has been observed in recent years. In this course, students survey and report recent developments in bioinformatic algorithms and applications. Active discussion and debate are important components which will enhance the students' understanding.

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