PG Department: Humanities & Social Sciences Course Name

governance and administration and highlights some of the most recent issues related to E-Governance and Economic Reforms in India. Syllabus 1. Governa...

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PG Course Name :

Department: Humanities & Social Sciences Social Sciences in India

Course Code: HST-612 Credit: 3(L-T-P: 3-0-0) Version: Open Elective Pre-requisite course: Nil Objectives:  To understand how faculties of engineering influence integrated development of society  To examine how science and technology contribute to culture and ethics  To explore the possibilities of how living standards of the people, particularly of people at margin can be raised.  To generate those potentialities by which India could become effective partner of global order.  To create those possibilities by which technological innovations could resolve day to day problems of the people. Syllabus 1. The Meaning, Nature and Scope of Social Sciences 2. The Interface between Science, Society and Technologies 3. Conceptual understanding of Social Sciences: Society, State, Development, Economy, Social Change, Hierarchy, Democracy, Urbanization, Industrialism, Rural-Urban Interface, Globalization. 4. Society, Politics and Development 5. The Importance of Social Research in Technological Development 6. The impact of Industrial, Technological and Media Revolutions on Global Order– Challenges before Indian Society: Casteism, Communalism, Regionalism, Terrorism , Nation Building, Gender Disparity, Child Labour, Unemployment, Demographic and Environmental Issues 7. Agricultural and Industrial Modernization and its impact on Rural, Urban and Tribal World 8. Technological Innovation and Social Life 9. Good Governance and Technological Change 10. The Role of Constitution in making Modern India Readings: 1. Sociology: T. B. Bottomore 2. Constitution of India: D D Basu 3. Understanding Social Science: Roger Trigg 4. Research Methodology in Social Sciences: Wilkinson and Bhandarkar 5. Science, Technology and Society: Rajeshwar Prasad 6. Social Problems in India: Ram Ahuja 7. The Substance of Politics: E. Ashirvadam 8. Indian Economy: Rudradutt and Sundaram

PG Course Name :

Department: Humanities & Social Sciences Governance and Reform in India

Course Code: HST-613 Credit: 3(L-T-P: 3-0-0) Version: Open Elective Pre-requisite course: Nil Course Rationale: The course seeks to familiarize the students to the major issues relating to governance and reforms in India. It introduces the students to the basic concepts in governance and administration and highlights some of the most recent issues related to EGovernance and Economic Reforms in India.

Syllabus 1. Governance and Reform – Meaning and Concepts  Indian Constitution  Bureaucracy and Public Administration  Good Governance  Innovations in Administration and Governance  Administrative Reforms 2. E-Governance in India  Introduction to E-Governance  National E-Governance Plan/ Digital India  Case Studies of E-Governance Models in India  Public Private Partnership in E-Governance 3. Critical Issues in E-Governance  Digital Divide in India  Cyber Security  I.T Act and Freedom of Expression  Data Confidentiality 4. Key Issues in Economic Reform  Reforms and Redistribution  Politics of Economic Reforms (MNCs, Retail etc. )  Make in India Campaign  Agrarian Distress and Need for Reform Readings: 1. E Governance Initiatives in India http://www.arc.gov.in/11threp/ARC_11thReport_Ch4.pdf 2. National e Governance Plan, http://www.arc.gov.in/11threp/ARC_11thReport_Ch4.pdf 3. Vandana Gupta and Ajay Sharma, E Governance in India: Problems, Challenges and Prospects, Research Journal of Economic and Business Studies, Vol.1 No.9, 2012

http://www.theinternationaljournal.org/ojs/index.php?journal=rjebs&page=article&op=vi ew&path%5B%5D=1110 4. B. Muthukumaran, Information Technology for Management, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2010 5. Misra and Puri (2010), Indian Economy, New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House 6. Ministry of Finance, Government of India (2014) Economic Survey 7. Economic and Political Weekly, Special articles on Indian Economy 8. Frankel, Francine (2009) India’s Political Economy: The Gradual Revolution, New Delhi, Oxford University Press

PG Course Name :

Department: Humanities & Social Sciences Indian Constitution, Democracy and World Affairs

Course Code: Credit: Version: Pre-requisite course:

HST-604 3(L-T-P: 3-0-0) Open Elective Nil

Course Rationale: The Course seeks to introduce the students to the basics of Government and Politics in India in its organizational and structural domains. It also discusses the major issues in Contemporary Indian Politics and India’s relations with the world.

Syllabus 1. The Constitution of India  Preamble  Fundamental Rights and Duties  Directive Principles of State Policy  Constitutional Remedies 2. Organs of the State  Legislature  Executive  Judiciary  Bureaucracy 3. Indian Democracy: Issues and Problems  Electoral Democracy and Party Politics  Internal Conflicts (Terrorism, Insurgency, Naxalism)  Corruption  Economic Reforms and Redistributive Justices 4. India and the World  India’s Role in Global Order   

India and her Neighbors India’s Role in Middle East, Look East Policy India and Major International Organizations

Readings: 1) Chandra, Bipan and Mridula Mukherjee and Aditya Mukherjee (2000), India since Independence, New Delhi: Penguin 2) Sikri, Rajiv (2012), Challenge and Strategy:Rethinking India’s Foreign Policy, New Delhi: Sage

3) Basu, Durga Das (2014), Introduction to the Constitution of India, Nagpur: Lexisnexis 4) Fadia, B.L and Fadia, Kuldeep (2014), Indian Government and Politics, Agra: Sahitya Bhavan Publications 5) Austin, Granville (2002), The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation, New Delhi: Oxford University Press. 6) Chakrabarty Bidyut and Rajendra Gupta (2007) Indian Government and Politics, New Delhi: Sage 7) S. Cohen, (2002) India: Emerging Power, Brookings Institution Press. 8) R. S. Yadav, India’s foreign policy (in Hindi) 9) J. N. Dixit, India's Foreign Policy: 1947-2003.

UG Course Name :

Department: Humanities & Social Sciences Indian Constitution and Polity

Course Code: HST-407 Credit: 3(L-T-P: 2-1-0) Version: Open Elective Pre-requisite course: Nil Objectives: The objective of the course is how to deal and adjust in the society under government regulations. Constitution is the highest law of the land and every department owes its origin to its laws. To make governance better an engineer must conduce to E-governance through computers and knowledge of cyber laws. An engineer must know the limits of state action and regulations by acquainting himself with the laws that applied by the bureaucrats. Since an engineer works at different places and sights, he must have the basic knowledge of centre – state relations with reference to policy of financing the key projects. The knowledge of Constitution is necessary for him in order to ensure that the rules and regulations under which public and private sector works, do not violate the provisions of the Constitution. Knowledge of corporate culture is necessary for him. He must understand the compulsions of the public private partnership and philosophy of state ownership of key industries.

Syllabus 1. 2. 3. 4.

Introduction to Constitution of India. Role of Public Sector Undertakings in economic development. Public policy making in India and influence of new globalised world order I.T.Law in India - Section 4-10 of I.T Act :Cyber laws in India - Section 43-47 of I.T Act -Section 65-78 of I.T Act 5. E-Governance and role of engineers in E-Governance. 6. Socialist policy of India and its relevance. 7. Role of Planning Commission in economic development. 8. Finance Commission and centre-State relations 9. Fundamental Rights and Fundamental Duties. 10. Directive Principles of State Policy. 11. Politics of Industrialization in India and the policy of Liberalization Privatization and Globalization (LPG) 12. Need for reformed engineering serving at the Union and State level. 13. Role of I.T. professionals in Judiciary 14. Problem of Alienation and Secessionism in few states creating hurdles in Industrial development. References: 1. An Introduction to the Constitution of India by: Brij Kishore Sharma 2. Relevant document related Government of India Policy. 3. Cyber Law by Dr. Gupta and Agarwal. 4. www.indiancourts.nic.in 5. Public Administration by Awasthi and Maheshwari

UG Course Name : Course Code: Credit: Version: Pre-requisite course:

Department: Humanities & Social Sciences Introduction to Sociology HST-401 3(L-T-P: 2-1-0) Open Elective Nil

Syllabus 1. Sociology-nature, scope and relevance. Relevance of this subject to the students describing its scope for the good of society. 2. Some basic concepts: Group; Society; Culture: To know and understand the society, various pressure groups and interest groups that dominates the society and government and country at large and the culture of the society where a person has to survive and work. 3. Sociological thoughts: Plato, Aristotle, Marx, Max Weber, Gandhi and Nehru. Thoughts of the great thinkers regarding the society, social structure, capitalism socialism, labor problems and production in the country and its distribution. 4. Social Institutions: Family; Economy; Education; Religion; Political: Role played by family, economy, education, religion and politics in the development and progress of the country. 5. Social processes and Social stratification: Mobility and Inequality: Importance of these social processes and stratification like mobility and inequality on development and planning. 6. Social changes and development, Westernization, Sanskritisation, Modernization, Secularism: Effect of these changes on society and consumer behavior leading to production and development. 7. Globalization, Industrial relations, Cyber crime, Terrorism: Result of the policy of LPG( Liberalization, Globalization, Privatization) on society and country at large, changes in the industrial relations, increase of cyber crimes, their causes and remedies and the problem of terrorism faced by the developed countries like India. 8. Professional Ethics: Need requirement and importance of professional ethics in the society.

References: 1. Henslin, James. M;SOCIOLOGY – A Down to Earth Approach; Allyn and Bacon; Boston, London, Singapore – 1997. 2. Featherstone, Mike, Scott Lash & Roland Robertson (editors) GLOBAL MODERNITIES, Sage Publications, London, New Delhi, 1995. 3. Schaefer. Richard.T&Robert.P.Lamm. SOCIOLOGY, McGraw Hill, Inc. New York, New Delhi, 1992. 4. Smelser, Neil.J. SOCIOLOGY, Black Well Publishers, Cambridge, Mssachusetts, USA; 1994. 5. Anthony Giddens – Sociology, Polity Press. Journals 1. American Journal of Sociology / British Journal of Sociology.

BASIC ECONOMICS (HST102) CORE COURSE in I B. TECH Course Structure

2- 1- 0

(Credits 3)

OBJECTIVE: To provide the students an insight into the basic concepts and analytical methods of economics so as to help them understand the issues related to a firm/ industry/ business organization helpful in decision making related to demand, production, pricing, markets etc. In addition some ideas of basic macro economic concepts are to be presented to make the students aware of various economic issues and environment. APPROACH: The approach is to focus on concept and application using practical examples and case studies. COURSE CONTENTS:  Basic Economic Concepts and foundations of economics for decision – making; circular flows  Demand analysis and consumer behaviour; elasticity of demand and its measurement; supply analysis and price – mechanism.  Production Analysis – short run and long run production functions; law of variable proportions and returns to scale.  Cost Concepts and Analysis (short run and long run), Revenue curves under perfect and imperfect competition  Break Even Analysis (revenue – cost –output relationship).  Market Structures; pricing in perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly.  Economic Appraisal Techniques (pay - back period, NPV, IRR, cost - benefit ratio).  Macro Economic Concepts such as national income, inflation, deflation, stagflation, monetary and fiscal policies, business cycles, foreign exchange rates and balance of payments REFERENCE BOOKS 1. 2. 3. 4.

Managerial Economics, H.C. Peterson, W. Cris Lewis & S.K.Jain; Prentice Hall. Managerial Economics, Suma Damodran; Oxford University Press. Managerial Economics, G.S. Gupta; Tata Mc Graw Hill. Industrial Economics, An Introductory Text Book, R.R. Barthwal; New Age International (P) Limited. 5. Economics; Samuelson, Nordhaus; Tata Mc Graw Hill. 6. Managerial Economics, C.S. Barla,; National Publishing House, N. Delhi 7. Managerial Economics, N.D. Mathur; Shivam Book House (Pvt. Ltd.),Jaipur

UG Core Course IV Semester CSE Economic Environment (HST202) (2-1-0: 3 Credits) Prerequisite: None Course Objective: To provide the students an insight into the multifaceted economic environment & to sensitize the students on issues & problems of the Indian economy in the global perspective. The course involves the understanding of the markets, industrial environment and performance of various sectors of the economy which play an important role in determining the macro environment. Approach: The approach is to focus on the understanding of the theoretical concepts using case studies, projects and seminars. Course Contents  Environmental Influences; elements of micro & macro environment; PESTLE analysis.  Economic growth & development; primary, secondary and tertiary sectors; structural changes & emerging sectors of the Indian economy.  National Income; concepts & measurement; circular flows of income.  Review of five year plans in India, planning strategy and objectives.  Current trends in industrial growth, industrial and licensing policy, growth of private sector, problems of public sector units, policy changes for industrial growth; environment for the SME sector.  Design and strategy of economic reforms and liberalization: India’s growth post liberalization.  Main trends in imports and exports, balance of payments in recent years, environment for foreign capital and investment.  Intellectual property rights and R & D environment.  Banking reforms and challenges; business opportunities in the rural sector.  Monetary & Fiscal Policies; meaning, importance & instruments.  Global economic environment and opportunities. Text & References: 1. Ishwar C. Dhingra, “The Indian Economy: Environment and Policy”, Sultan Chand, New Delhi 2. H. L. Ahuja, “Economic Environment of Business: Macroeconomic Analysis”, Sultan Chand, New Delhi 3. Amartya Sen & Jean Dreze, “INDIA: Development and Participation”, Oxford University Press, India 4. S. K. Mishra & Puri, “Development Issues of Indian Economy”, Himalaya 5. Ahluwalia, I.J. & IMD Little, “India’s Economic Reform and Development”, Oxford University Press, India

UG Open Elective INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS (HST402) Credits 3 Course Structure: 2L+1T Level: VII Semester & above

Total marks = 100 (40 MTE + 20 CWS + 40 ETE)

Objective: To provide the students an insight into the basic concepts & analytical tools of economics related to firm/industry/organization. The course involves the understanding of the markets, industrial environment, policies and problems of industrial growth and development. Approach: The approach is to focus on concept and application using practical examples & case studies. Course Contents  Scope of Industrial Economics  Basic Concepts: Plants, firm and industry, organizational forms and alternative motives of a firm  Market structures, economies of scale and economies of scope, optimum firm size, pricing under alternative structures  Market power and concentration. Integration, diversification and merger  Industrial productivity and its measurement, industrial location and efficiency  Input output analysis, project appraisal, cost-benefit analysis and capital budgeting  Industrialization and economic development  Problems of industrialization in India. Role of public, private and joint sectors  Growth of small-scale industries and their problems. Government regulation of industry, balanced regional development Text & References: 8. Industrial Economics, An Introductory Text Book, R.R. Barthwal; New Age International (P) Limited. 9. Economics; Samuelson, Nordhaus; Tata Mc Graw Hill, New Delhi. 10. Industrial Economics, A K Sharma; Anmol Publications. 11. Industrial Economics: Theory and Evidences, D. Hay and D. J. Morris; Oxford University Press, London.

UG Open Elective INDIAN ECONOMIC PROBLEMS & POLICIES (HST406) Credits 3 Course Structure: 2L+1T Level: VII Semester & above

Objective: To sensitize the students on issues & problems of Indian economy; the performance and polices of various sectors of the economy which plays an important role in determining the macro environment. Approach: The approach is to focus on the understanding of the theoretical concepts using projects and seminars. Course Contents  Performance of Indian economy since 1951; primary, secondary and tertiary sectors  Agricultural growth in India, interregional variation in growth of output and productivity, institutional & technological changes, farm price policy, food situation.  Recent trends in industrial growth, industrial and licensing policy, growth of private sector, problems of public sector units, industrial sickness, policy changes for industrial growth  Economic reforms and liberalization: India’s growth post liberalization  Main trends in imports and exports, balance of payments in recent years, foreign capital  Population growth, Demographic dividend of India  Indian planning, strategy and objectives, India’s five year plans  Poverty, unemployment and underemployment in India  Income inequalities in India  Environmental problems. Text & References: 6. The Indian Economy: Environment and Policy, Ishwar C. Dhingra; Sultan Chand, New Delhi 7. Development Issues of Indian Economy, S. K. Mishra & Puri; Himalaya 8. Agriculture, Food Security, Poverty and Environment, C. H. Hanumantha Rao; Oxford University Press, India 9. INDIA: Development and Participation, Amartya Sen & Jean Dreze; Oxford University Press, India

PG/PhD: Open/Program Elective INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS (HST 606)

Credits 3

(3-0-0)

Concept and nature of Econometrics, Methodology of Econometrics,  Estimation & testing of hypothesis  Nature of Regression Analysis, Two Variable Regression Analysis: meaning, assumptions of least squares, properties of least square estimator. Regression analysis and analysis of variance.  Multiple Regression Analysis: meaning, assumptions and interpretation  Dummy Variable Regression Model: nature of dummy variables, ANOVA models, use of dummy variables in seasonal analysis  Multicollinearity: nature, detection  Specification Error

REFERENCE BOOKS 1. Business Research Methods, Zikmund William G; Dryden Press 2. Basic Econometrics, Damodar N.Gujarati; McGraw Hill 3. Introduction to Econometrics, Christopher Dougherty; Oxford University Press

PG/PhD: Open/Program Elective INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (HST610)

Credits 3

(3-0-0)

 World trade: overview. Gravity Model and changing patterns of trade.  International trade theory: overview, labour productivity and comparative advantage  Resources, comparative advantage and income distribution  Economies of Scale, imperfect competition and international trade  Dynamic factors in international trade  Free trade vs Protection  Exchange rate and open economy macroeconomics, balance of payments  International monetary system and IMF  Economic Integration and developing countries, trade policy in developing countries, trade problems in developing countries  Relationship between foreign aid, trade and economic development, role of MNC’s in developing countries  Structure, trends and direction of India’s foreign trade

REFERENCE BOOKS 1. International Economics, 3rd. Edition, Sawyer & Sprinkle; Prentice Hall India Ltd. 2. International Economics, Dominick Salvatore; Wiley India Student Edition, 2010

MBA Core Course BMT102 Managerial Economics

(2-1-0: 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: None Course Objective: The course is designed to provide the students an insight into the basic concepts and analytical methods of economics. This would enable them to understand the issues related to a firm/ industry/ business organization helpful in decision making with regard to demand, production, pricing, markets etc. Course Contents Basic concepts and foundations of economics for business decision – making. Demand-supply analysis and price – mechanism. Utility analysis and consumer behaviour. Elasticity of demand & its measurement; Demand estimation and forecasting. Production analysis & function in the short run and long run; laws of variable proportions and returns to scale; optimal input analysis; economies of scale and scope.  Cost concepts and cost-output relationship in the short run and long run, revenue curves under perfect and imperfect competition; break even analysis (revenue – cost –output relationship).  Alternative market structures; price and output decisions in perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly; collusive behaviour of firms; game theory and strategic behaviour; general pricing strategies.  Risk analysis; capital budgeting and investment decisions.     

REFERENCE BOOKS 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

H.C. Peterson, W. Cris Lewis & S.K.Jain, “Managerial Economics”, Prentice Hall. Suma Damodran, “Managerial Economics”, Oxford University Press. G.S. Gupta, “Managerial Economics”, Tata Mc Graw Hill. Anindya Sen, “Micro Economics Theory and Applications”, Oxford University Press. Samuelson, Nordhas, “Economics”, Tata Mc Graw Hill. C.S. Barla, “Managerial Economics”, National Publishing House, N. Delhi N.D. Mathur, “Managerial Economics”, Shivam Book House (Pvt. Ltd.),Jaipur

Open Elective (PG) Course Title: Technical Writing and Presentation Skills Credits: 3 (L-2 T-1 P-0) Course Objective: To develop essential skills of writing and presenting reports, papers and the like Course Content: 1. WRITING SKILLS 1.1 Technical Writing-Basic Principles 1.1.1 Words-Phrases-Sentences 1.1.2 Construction of Cohesive Paragraphs 1.1.3 Elements of Style 1.2 Principles of Summarizing 1.2.1 Abstract 1.2.2 Summary 1.2.3 Synopsis 1.3 Technical Reports 1.3.1 Salient Features 1.3.2 Types of Reports 1.3.3 Structure of Reports 1.3.4 Data Collection 1.3.5 Use of Graphic Aids 1.3.6 Drafting and Writing 1.4 Writing Research Papers 1.4.1 Basic Guidelines 1.4.2 Documentation 2. PRESENTATION SKILLS 2.1 Speaking Skills 2.1.1 Accuracy vs. Fluency 2.1.2 The Audience 2.1.3 Pronunciation Guidelines 2.1.4 Voice Control 2.2 Professional Presentations 2.2.1 Planning 2.2.2 Preparing 2.2.3 Presentation Strategies 2.2.4 Overcoming Communication Barriers 2.2.5 Using Technology 2.2.6 Effective Presentations Assessment:

The assessment will be based on Term Examinations as well as internal summation keeping in mind the students’ performance in the class as well. References: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Kumar, Sanjay & Pushp Lata, “Communication Skills”, Oxford University Press,2011 Quirk & Randolph, “ A University Grammar of English”, Pearson,2006 Rutherford, Andrea J., “ Basic Communication Skills for Technology”, Pearson, 2007 Rizvi, M Ashraf, “Effective Technical Communication”, McGraw Hill,2009 Leigh, Andrew & Maynard, Michael, “The Perfect Presentation”, Random House Barker, Larry L., “Communication”, Prentice-Hall Lesikar & Flatley, “Basic Business Communication-Skills For Empowering the Internet Generation”, Tata McGraw-Hill

MBA Core Course BMT204 Business Environment

(2-1-0: 3 Credit)

Prerequisite: None Course Objective: To provide the students an insight into the multifaceted business environment & to sensitize the students on issues & problems of Indian economy. The course involves the understanding of the markets, industrial environment and performance of various sectors of the economy which play an important role in determining the macro environment. Course Contents  Environmental Influences on Business; elements of micro & macro environment; PESTLE analysis.  Economic growth & development; primary, secondary and tertiary sectors; structural changes & emerging sectors of the Indian economy.  Review of five year plans in India, planning strategy and objectives.  Agricultural performance in India, institutional & technological changes, farm price policy, food situation.  Current trends in industrial growth, industrial and licensing policy, growth of private sector, problems of public sector units, industrial sickness, policy changes for industrial growth; environment for the SME sector.  Design and strategy of economic reforms and liberalization: India’s growth post liberalization.  Main trends in imports and exports, balance of payments in recent years, environment for foreign capital and investment.  Intellectual property rights and R & D environment.  Banking reforms and challenges; business opportunities in the rural sector.  Global business environment and opportunities. Suggested Reading and References 10. Ishwar C. Dhingra, “The Indian Economy: Environment and Policy”, Sultan Chand, New Delhi 11. Amartya Sen & Jean Dreze, “INDIA: Development and Participation”, Oxford University Press, India 12. S. K. Mishra & Puri, “Development Issues of Indian Economy”, Himalaya 13. C. H. Hanumantha Rao, “Agriculture, Food Security, Poverty and Environment”, Oxford University Press, India 14. Ahluwalia, I.J. & IMD Little, “India’s Economic Reform and Development”, Oxford University Press, India

HST 501

DYNAMICS OF COMMUNICATION

Credits: 3 {2-1-0}

Objective: To help students communicate in English effectively and with confidence through developing their skills in listening, reading, writing and speaking.

Course Plan: Module No. 1 II

III

III

Modules

Learning Objectives

Introduction to the course Principles of Communication

Defining Communication with emphasis on various stages and skills in language acquisition Introducing students to characteristic features of effective communication; acquainting them with the barriers to communication and suggesting ways to overcome such barriers. Teaching the importance of understanding nonverbal communication.

Effective Reading & Writing Oral Presentations

Helping students develop an effective writing style and the ability to comprehend written text and analyse given data Helping students learn techniques for making effective professional presentations; helping them observe the nuances of presentations such as using body and voice effectively; drafting captivating beginnings; organizing main body; using statistics; using audio-visual aids appropriately, etc.

Integration of skills is an important aspect of the teaching-learning process through this course for which the following activities have been designed: • LISTENING EXERCISES • EXTEMPORE SPEAKING/SPEECHES • ROLE PLAYS • GROUP DISCUSSIONS • DESCRIBING OBJECTS/PEOPLE/EVENTS ETC. • WRITING NOTES/ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS • COMPREHENDING WRITTEN TEXT/DATA Reference Books: • Barker, Larry L.: Communication, Prentice Hall, New Jersey • Rai, Urmila & Rai, S.M.: Effective Communication, Himalaya Publishing House • Glendinning, Eric H., & Holmstrom: Study Reading, CUP • Pushp Lata & Kumar, Sanjay: Communicate or Collapse, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi: 2007



Leki, Ilona, Academic Writing: Exploring Processes and Strategies, 2nd Edition, New Delhi: Cambridge University Press, 2010.

• • •

Arnold, George T., Media Writer’s Handbook: A Guide to Common Writing & Editing Problems, 4th Edition, New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill, 2010. Raman, Meenakshi and Sangeeta Sharma, Technical Communication: Principles and Practice, 2nd Edition, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2011. Krishna Mohan and N.P.Singh, Speaking English Effectively, New Delhi: Macmillan,1994.

OPEN ELECTIVE:(UG) CODE HST-350 SHORT STORIES AND CREATIVE WRITING LEVEL:

V/VI SEMESTER

CREDITS: 3

2L+1T

SYLLABUS

A) Short stories by: Gerald Durrell: Excerpts from Golden bats and Pink Pigeons, Excerpts from The Overloaded Ark, The Stationary Ark, A Treeful of Bears, The Miracle Climb Ayn Rand: Good Copy, Her Second career, The Simplest Thing in The World, Excerpts from Atlas Shrugged Saki: A Matter of sentiment, The Feast of Nemesis, The Guests, The Cobweb, The Baker’s Dozen, The Toys of Peace, A Sacrifice to Necessity Khushwant Singh:Karma, The Mark of Vishnu, The Voice Of God R.K. Narayan:Yayati, Draupadi, A Horse and Two Goats, An Astrologer’s day, Under the Banyan Tree O. Henry:The Ransom of The Red Chief, A Blackjack Bargainer, A Little Local Colour, The Gold that Glittered, The Voice of the City, The Last Leaf, The Furnished Room Chekhov: An Incident at Law, Minds in Ferment, A Blunder, The Requiem, Revenge, The Orator, A Story Without an End,The Death of a Civil Servant Pirandello: It’s Not to be Taken Seriously, A Character’s Tragedy, A Prancing Horse, The Oil Jar, War S. H. Manto:Toba Tek Singh, Odour Somerset Maugham: Mayhew, A Man with a Conscience, Raw Material, Mirage, Straight Flush Maupassant:The Necklace, Vendetta, Boule de Suif, In the Spring, Playing with Fire Jeffrey Archer : Clean sweep Ignatius, A Chapter of accidents, You’ll Never Live to Regret It, The Perfect Gentleman, Old Love, B) Creative Writing Workshop:One-Day Workshop(s) with practicing authors inbuilt into the course C) Story writing: Assignments on short-story writing and/or translations

UG Course Code:HSP103 Credit: 1 Version: Core Pre-requisite course: nil

Department: Humanities & Social Sciences Course Name: LANGUAGE LABORATORY L-T-P: 0-0-2 Approved on: 12-07-2012

Syllabus Objectives: 

To provide an opportunity to the students to improve their pronunciation and language skills through the Language Laboratory software.



To engage them in interactive exercises focusing on improving their communication skills and fluency in English.

Syllabus: 1. Pronunciation Practice: Practice in Phonetic Symbols (IPA) and Transcriptionon Language Laboratory software 2. Language Skills: Practice in Common Errors, Prepositions, Tenses, Passive Voice, Conditional Sentences,Reported speech, Subject-Verb Agreement, Idioms and Proverbs on Language Laboratory software 3. Speaking Skills Practice: Self-presentation, Extempore, Just a Minute, Weave a Story Elocution, Expansion of themes and Presentation of Projects References: 1. Jones, Daniel. English Pronouncing Dictionary.ELBS. 2. Sethi, J., P.V. Dhamija. A Course in Phonetics and Spoken English. PHI Learning. 3. McKay, Matthew, Martha Davis, Patrick Fanning. Messages: The Communication Skills Book. New Harbinger Publications; Third Edition, 2009. 4. Mitra, Barun K. Personality Development and Soft Skills. OxfordUniversity Press.

OPEN ELECTIVE: SHORT STORIES AND CREATIVE WRITING LEVEL:

V/VI SEMESTER

CREDITS: 3

CURRICULAR STRUCTURE:2L+1T

CODE HS-350

SYLLABUS: Short stories by: Gerald Durrell: Excerpts from Golden bats and Pink Pigeons, Excerpts from The Overloaded Ark, The Stationary Ark, A Treeful of Bears, The Miracle Climb Ayn Rand: Good Copy, Her Second career, The Simplest Thing in The World, Excerpts from Atlas Shrugged Saki: A Matter of sentiment, The Feast of Nemesis, The Guests, The Cobweb, The Baker’s Dozen, The Toys of Peace, A Sacrifice to Necessity Khushwant Singh: Karma, The Mark of Vishnu, The Voice Of God R.K. Narayan: Yayati, Draupadi, A Horse and Two Goats, An Astrologer’s day, Under the Banyan Tree O. Henry:The Ransom of The Red Chief, A Blackjack Bargainer, A Little Local Colour, The Gold that Glittered, The Voice of the City, The Last Leaf, The Furnished Room Chekhov: An Incident at Law, Minds in Ferment, A Blunder, The Requiem, Revenge, The Orator, A Story Without an End, The Death of a Civil Servant Pirandello: It’s Not to be Taken Seriously, A Character’s Tragedy, A Prancing Horse, The Oil Jar, War S. H. Manto:Toba Tek Singh, Odour Somerset Maugham: Mayhew, A Man with a Conscience, Raw Material, Mirage, Straight Flush Maupassant: The Necklace, Vendetta, Boule de Suif, In the Spring, Playing with Fire Jeffrey Archer : Clean sweep Ignatius, A Chapter of accidents, You’ll Never Live to Regret It, The Perfect Gentleman, Old Love, A) Creative Writing Workshop: One-Day Workshop(s) with practicing authors inbuilt into the course B) Story writing: Assignments on short-story writing and/or translations

UG Open Elective

ENGLISH FOR COMMUNICATION (ADVANCED) Level – VII Semester and higher Course Code: HST 405 Credits: 3 (2L+1T)

Objectives: The structure of this course involves a sequence from theory and skills to application. The primary objectives of this course are: 1. To develop the competence of the students to use both spoken & written language for effective technical communication. 2. To teach them professional writing skills and tools focusing on all the essential aspects of communication. 3. To train them to use language effectively to face interviews, group discussions, public speaking. 4. To enable them to learn better pronunciation through stress on word accent, intonation, and pronunciation. 5. To teach the students good linguistic competence- through accuracy in grammar and vocabulary. Syllabus: 1. Structure of English – Determiners, Modals, Reported Speech, Phrasal Verbs, Possessive, Personal and Reflexive Pronouns, Relative Pronouns and Clauses, Adjectives and Adverbs, Comparative and Superlative Degree, Punctuation 2. Writing – Note Taking, Paraphrasing, Reviews of Articles and Books, Abstracts Letters – Complaints, Adjustment, Sales Promotion 3. Reading – Comprehension and Analysis, Active Reading 4. Study Skills – Use of Dictionary & Thesaurus, Vocabulary Building Exercises 5. Oral practice – Improving Articulation, Pronunciation and Intonation using Language Laboratory Software, Practice in Speaking for Formal or Informal Purposes through

Classroom Exercises 6. Listening Comprehension using Language Laboratory Software Assessment: Through term-tests, assignments, critical reviews, practice exercises for oral and written proficiency, presentations, group discussions. Suggested Reading and References: 1. A Student’s Grammar of the English Language, Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, Longman, 1990. 2. Rediscover Grammar (2ndEdn.), David Crystal, Longman, 2004. 3. Practical English Usage (3rdEdn.), Michael Swan, Oxford University Press, 2005. 4. A Practical English Grammar, Thomson and Martinet. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1986. 5. A Communicative Grammar of English, Leech, Geoffrey & Jan Svartvik. London: Longman, 2003. 6. Living English Structure, W. Stannard Allen. Hyderabad: Orient Longman, 1997. 7. Study Skills in English: A Course in Reading Skills for Academic Purposes, Michael J. Wallace, Cambridge University Press, 2004. 8. Cambridge English Pronouncing Dictionary (17thEdn.), Cambridge University Press, 2006.

PG Open Elective BUILDING LANGUAGE SKILLS Course Code: HST 601 Credits : 3 (2L + 1T) Objectives: 1. To enhance students’ English language competence through intensive practices of listening, speaking, reading, and writing exercises 2. To enhance students’ reading skills, such as guessing meaning from context, scanning, skimming, identifying main ideas, inferring, and developing reading fluency 3. To increase students' vocabulary to enable them to cope with written textsof different levels of complexity and to actively take part in discussions. 4. Students will do extensive readings, learn the terminology and strengthen their English vocabulary, grammar and structure. They will also discuss theme-based materials and literary texts. 5. The course reviews applied English in a practical sense, including case based studies, data interpretation, basics of writing research papers, and enhancement of reading and listening skills through interactive methods. Syllabus: Drafting paragraphs, using reader-centred organisational patterns for presenting information.Studying literary passages and responding to questions based on different aspects of the passage. Précis writing and Summarizing.Note-making and Note-taking. Writing a Job Application, Résumé, Curriculum Vitae. Drafting a Memo, Notice, Agenda and Minutes. Case-based teaching including Case Studies and Business Problems. Data interpretation and narrativizing that data. Basics of writing a Research Paper, Dissertation, Thesis in association with the parent Dept./Supervisor. Basics of style and documentation in a Research Paper. Creating and delivering effective oral Presentations, conducting Group Discussions, developing Negotiation Skills, strategies for handlingJAM sessions, facing Interviews.

Articulating Business Problems, summarizing Solutions, following Verbal Instructions.Using Elevator Pitch, communicating one’s USP. Presenting the same content in different forms e.g. Blog writing, White paper, Presentation, Travelogue, Journal writing, etc. Vocabulary expansion – Word-list, commonly confused words, Synonyms and Antonyms, Foreign words and phrases, One-word substitution. Focus on Body Language through Role-play, enactment of Skits and Street plays, making Videos. Enhancement of listening and speaking skills through TED Talks, News Broadcast on the Radio. Assessment:Through practical exercises and tests, both verbal and written, to assess the understanding of the conventions of the use of English in different contexts, both formal and informal. Suggested Reading and References: 1. Technical Communication: A Reader-Centred Approach. 6thed. By Paul V. Anderson. Thomson Wadsworth, 2007. 2. Using English in Science and Technology by R.K. Singh. 3rd ed. Prakash Book Depot, Bareilly, 2010. 3. Technical Communication by Daniel G. Riordan. Cengage Learning, 2005. 4. Effective Business Communication by Murphy, Hildebrant& Thomas. Tata McGraw-Hill, 2008. 5. Skills Development by Kevin Gallagher. Oxford Univ. Press, 2010. 6. Advanced Technical Communication by KavitaTyagi& Padma Misra. PHI Learning, 2011. 7. Communication Skills for Engineers and Scientists by Sangeeta Sharma and Binod Mishra, PHI Learning, 2009. 8. Handbook for Technical Writing by McMurrey& Buckley. Cengage Learning, 2008. Online Resources: 1. Online Writing Lab.at Purdue University (OWL): Writing resources and instructional material 2. Study.com : For enhancing language skills. 3. TED Talks

PG Open Elective CRITICAL THINKING AND WRITING Course Code

:

HST 608

Credits

:

3 (2L+1T)

Objectives :The primary objectives of this course are : 1. To enable students / learners to understand the logical connections between ideas. 2. To help them to identify, construct and evaluate arguments. 3. To equip them to detect inconsistencies and common mistakes in reasoning. 4. To enable them to write analytically for academic purpose. Syllabus : 1. Critical Thinking a) Importance and process b) Barriers to critical thinking 2. Argument a) Difference between an argument and an opinion b) Types of arguments c) Valid patters in arguments 3. Fallacies and Biases a) Types of fallacies b) Social influences on critical thinking 4. Developing critical thinking skills in the areas of reading, writing, speaking and listening 5. Constructing an academic argument (a) The role of world choices in building arguments (b) Hedging (c) Using evidence to support claims (d) Integrating evidence with comments (e) Using quotations, paraphrase and summaries (f) Avoiding plagiarism 6. Critical review

a) Purpose and structure b) Writing a critical review 7. Characteristics of critical and analytical writing 8. Issue writing

Assessment: Students' performance and progress will be evaluated through classwork sessionals, homeassignments, case studies, practice exercises, group activities, presentations, group discussions and term exams. Suggested Reading and References: 1. Anderson, Marilyn. Critical Reasoning, Academic Writing and Presentation Skills. New Delhi: Pearson Education, 2010. 2. Booth, W., G.G. Colomb, J.M. Williams. The Craft of Research. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003. 3. Cottrell, Stella. The Study Skills Handbook. London: Macmillan, 1990. 4. Gardner, Peter S. New Directions: Reading Writing and Critical Thinking. Cambridge Academic Writing Collection, 2005. 5. Mayfield, Marlys. Thinking for Yourself : Developing Critical Thinking Skills through Reading and Writing. Eighth Edition. Boston: Wadsworth. Cengage Learning, 2010. 6. Rossenwasser, David, Jill Stephen. Writing Analytically. Sixth Edition. Boston: Wadsworth. Cengage Learning, 2012. 7. Strunk, William, E.B. White. The Elements of Style. Fourth Edition. Penguin Press, 2008. 8. Tharp, Twyla. The Creative Habit: Learn it and Use it for Life. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2003. 9. Warburton, Nigel. Thinking from A to Z. Routledge Study Guide Series. Routledge, 2000. 10. Weston, Anthony. A Rulebook for Arguments. Fourth Edition. Indianapolis, Hackett Publishing Co., 2009.

PG Program Elective LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM Course Code: HST 704 Credits: 3 (3L) Total Marks: 100 (40 MTE + 20 CWS + 40 ETE) Objectives: 1. To introduce students to the major principles of literary theory and established methods of literary research. 2. To understand the broader ways in which literary theory applies to their own culture, global culture, and their own lives. 3. To enable them to apply various theoretical parameters in the analysis ofliterary and cultural texts. 4. To familiarize the learners with the trends and interdisciplinary nature of literary theories. 5. To introduce them to the conventions and style of research papers. Syllabus: 1. Classical Theories and Traditional Approaches 2. New Criticism & Formalism 3. Psychoanalytic Criticism 4. Myth and Archetypal Criticism 5. Marxist Criticism 6. Reception and Reader-Response Theory 7. Structuralism, Poststructuralism and Deconstruction 8. Modernism and Postmodernism 9. New Historicism and Cultural Studies 10. Feminism and Gender Studies 11. Postcolonial Criticism 12. Narratology 13. Ecocriticism

Assessment:Through tests, assignments, article reviews, interpretation of literary and cultural texts (films, drama and television shows) on the basis of given critical approaches or theories, class presentations

Suggested Reading and References: 1. Abrams, M. H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. (8th Edition) New Delhi: Akash Press, 2007. 2. Baldick, Chris. The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. 3. Barry, Peter. Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. New Delhi: Viva Books, 2008. 4. Braziel, Jana Evans, and Anita Mannur (Eds.) Theorizing Diaspora. London:Blackwell, 2003. 5. Cain, William E. et al, (Eds.) The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. New Yorkand London: W. W. Norton, 2010. 6. Enright, D.J., and Chickera, Ernst de. (Eds.) English Critical Texts. Delhi: OxfordUniversity Press, 1962. 7. Glotfelty, Cheryll, and Harold Fromm (Eds.) The Ecocriticism Reader: Landmarks inLiterary Ecology. Athens: The University of Georgia Press, 1996. 8. Guerin, Wilfred L. et al. A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature. 6th Ed. New York: OUP, 2010. 9. Hall, Donald E. Literary and Cultural Theory: From Basic Principles to Advanced Application. Boston: Houghton, 2001. 10. Lodge, David, and Nigel Wood (Eds.) Modern Criticism and Theory: A Reader.2nd Ed. New Delhi: Pearson, 1988. 11. Rice,Philip,and Patricia Waugh(Eds.) Modern Literary Theory. A Reader. 4th Ed. London: Hodder Arnold, 2001. 12. Selden, Raman, et al. A Reader’s Guide to Contemporary Literary Theory. 5th Ed. London:Longman, 2005. 13. Wolfreys, Julian. (Ed.)Introducing Literary Theories: A Guide and Glossary. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003.

Audit/Credit Course for Research Scholars: FOUNDATIONS OF RESEARCH AND ACADEMIC WRITING Course Code: HST 600 Credits: 3 (2L+1T) Total Marks: 100 (40 MTE + 20 CWS + 40 ETE) Objectives: 1. To provide the students the basic tools and materials for research 2. To acquaint them with the process of research 3. To guide them in presenting their research and results 4. To supervise the students as they write research papers on topics related to their Ph.D. research Syllabus: 1. Research: meaning and objectives 2. Research techniques in literary studies and linguistics/ social sciences/ quantitative methods for research 3. Resources and means of research: books, journals, anthologies, unpublished theses, conference proceedings, newspaper articles, e-journals, thesauruses, encyclopedias, Dissertation Abstracts, web references, research sites, printed indexes, e-mail discussion groups, special libraries, advanced study centers, virtual libraries, internet search engines 4. Developing study skills: reading and note-taking, reading academic journals and texts, mapping out a topic, planning and writing essays and articles, writing for impact, evaluating and presenting arguments 5. The process of research : selecting a research topic; review of literature; identifying aims and objectives; formulating the thesis statement; defining the scope and limitations; drafting a research proposal; planning the timeline 6. Presentation of research : title of the study, aims and objectives; format of research; pagination; grammar, punctuation and the conventions of academic writing: organization of materials; avoiding plagiarism; in-text citations; list of works cited; footnotes and endnotes; research findings; bibliography; using standard style sheets – MLA, APA, Chicago Manual, Harvard system of referencing.

Assessment: The performance and understanding of the students will be evaluated through two mid-term exams, end-term exam and class-work sessionals which will include writing and communicating two research papers on the topics of their choice in the supervision of their mentor. Suggested Reading and References: 1. Chindhade, S. and A. Thorat (2009), An Introduction to Research, Mumbai: Cambridge University Press. 2. Eliot, Simon and W. R. Owens (4th edn. 1998), A Handbook to Literary Research, London: Routledge & Open University. 3. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th edn. 2009), New York: MLA Association. 4. Oliver, Paul (2005), Writing Your Thesis, New Delhi: Vistaar Publications. 5. Sinha, M.P. (2004), Research Methods in English, New Delhi: Atlantic. 6. Brown, James Dean (2006), Understanding Research in Second Language Learning, New York: Cambridge University Press. 7. Adam Sirjohn (2004), Research Methodology: Methods & Techniques, Delhi: New Age International. 8. Miller, R. H. (1995), Handbook of Literary Research, Methuen. 9. Seliger (2001), Second Language Research Methods, Oxford: Oxford University Press. 10. Lenburg, Jeff (2007), Guide to Research, Viva Books. 11. Abdul Rahim, F. (2005), Thesis Writing: A Manual for Researchers , New Delhi: New Age International. 12. Hunt, Andy (2005), Your Research Project, New Delhi: Foundation Books. 13. Punch, K.E. (1998), Introduction to Social Research, London: Sage. 14. Brause, R.S. (2000), Writing your Doctoral Dissertation: Invisible Rules for Success, London: Falmer.

BMT107 Business Communication (2-1-1: 4 Credit) Prerequisite: None Course Objective: To acquaint students with the required skills for effective communication in business organisations. The course specifically aims at developing an understanding of what managers do and how they do what they do, specific needs of different business environments, the significance of different aspects of oral communication incorporate environments, and the role of oral communication in enhancing managerial efficacy. Course Contents  Introduction; Importance, Nature and Role and Process of Business Communication, Perceptions and Realities, Different Forms of Communication and their importance including body language, Barriers in Communication, How to make communication effective, Improving listening skills  Written Communication: Principles of Effective Written Communication; Commercial Letters, Report Writing, Speech Writing, Preparing Minutes of Meetings; Executive Summary of Documents, Writing Positive, Negative Persuasive, Electronic Messages; Non-Verbal Communication; Oral Communication: Art of Public Speaking, Effective Listening; Communicating in Teams  Writing Curriculum Vitae, Facing Interviews, Group Discussions  Communication with colleagues including Brain Storming, Verbal Communication with colleagues and clients & telephonic conversation  Business Reports and Proposals  Mass Communications-News Letters, Publicity Handouts, Instructions and Manuals, Handling the Press  Business Etiquette, Business Presentations & Public Speaking  Electronic Communication-FAX, e-mail, Internet and Multimedia  Communicating for leadership & organizational change  Important Parameters in Communication: The Cross Cultural Dimensions of Business Communication ,Technology and Communication  Ethical & Legal Issues in Business Communication  Mass Communication: Mass Communication & Promotion Strategies, Advertisements,  Publicity and Press Releases. Media Mix, Public Relations, Newsletters.  Other Communication Parameters: Negotiation Process & its Management, Designing Visual  Communication, Creating and Delivering Online Presentations Suggested Reading and References 1. Lesikar, Raymond V., Flatley, Marie E., Rentz, Kathryn and Pande, Neerja, “Business Communication: Making Connections in a Digital World”, Tata Mc Graw Hill, 11th edition, Special Indian Edition 2. Lesikar, Raymond V. and Pettit, J.D. “Business Communication: Theory and Application”, Richard D. Irwin Inc., New Delhi, 10th edition 3. Monippally, “Business Communication Strategies”, Tata McGraw Hill Publication. 4. Angell, “Business Communication Design”, McGraw Hill Publication 5. Hair, Dan O’, Friedrich, Gustav W. and Dixon, Lynda Dee, “Strategic Communication: In Business and the Profession”, Pearson Education, 6th edition 6. Hudson, Randolph H., “Business Communication”,Jaico Publishing House, 5th edition 7. Raman, Meenakshi and Singh, Prakash, “Business Communication”, Oxford University Press, 1st edition

Open Elective (UG) Communication Skills Code: HST 404

S.No.

Credits: 3

[ L-1 T- 2]

Contents

A. 1.

Effective Writing

2.

Paragraph Development

3.

Paragraph components and development of paragraph. Job Applications and Resumes

4.

Report Writing

Enriching Vocabulary

Introduction & characteristics of a report. Format of a report, structure of a report, samples. B. 5.

Oral Communication (Including Language Lab) Interview Skills Introduction, Types of Interviews, Job Interviews, Building Personality Traits such as Confidence, Assertiveness, etc.

6.

Group Communication Group Discussion, Meetings, Conferences, TeamWork

7.

Effective Presentation Strategies Introduction, Defining purpose, analyzing audience and locale, organizing contents, preparing an outline. Importance of Effective Non-Verbal Skills in Presentations.

Suggested Reading: 1. Adair, John: Effective Communication, MacMillan Publishers Ltd. 2. Kumar, Sanjay and Pushp Lata: Communication Skills, Oxford University Press 3. Mishra, Sunita & C. Muralikrishna: Communication Skills for Engineers, Pearson Education 4. Rutherfoord, Andrea A.: Basic Communication Skills for Technology, Pearson Education 5. Stuart, Cristina: Effective Speaking, Rupa Paperback

TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION: UG Core HST101

Credits: 3

1-2-0

Course Objective: to develop the skills of comprehending and analyzing a written work and to develop writing skills Selected chapters from the prescribed textbook: Insights: A Course in English Literature and Language by E. Elango, Orient Blackswan Publishers: ‘The Diary of a Young Girl’ ‘’Freedom at Midnight’ ‘Wings of Fire’ ‘Sporting Spirit’ ‘Our Urgent Need for Self-esteem ’ “Emotional Intelligence’ Grammar and Writing: Reading Skills Subject-verb agreement Tenses Passive voice Writing Skills Prepositions Conditional sentences reported speech Précis Writing Common errors Common idioms and proverbs (meaning and usage) Formal letters including job application with resume Writing emails Suggested References: 1. Eastwood, John: Oxford Practice Grammar,OUP 2. Fitikides, T.J.: Common Mistakes in ERnglish, Orient Longman 3. Jones, Daniel: English Pronouncing Dictionary,. Cambridge University Press 4. Kumar, Shiv K. & Hemlatha Nagarajan: Learn Correct English, Pearson Education 5. Murphy, Raymond:P English Grammar in Use, Cam,bridge University Press 6. Thornbury, Scott: Natural Grammar, Oxford University Press