Program Monday, October 3, 2016

Wenjun Martini, Hemostasis – Damage Control Resuscitation, US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Houston, ... Monday, October 3, 2016 14:40-15:40 Ro...

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Program

‐as of 06/10/16‐subject to change

Monday, October 3, 2016 9:20-10:00 Room 1

Presidential Address

17:20-18:20 Room 1

Plenary 1

Hiroyuki Hirasawa, Professor Emeritus, Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan

Chair - Masataka Majima, Department of Pharmacology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan Innate Immunity and Inflammation Shizuo Akira, Laboratory of Host Defense, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan

page 1 of 9

Program

‐as of 06/10/16‐subject to change

Monday, October 3, 2016 10:00-11:40 Room 1

Symposium 1 Achievement and Future Perspectives of Member Shock Society Chairs/Organizers Hiroyuki Hirasawa, Professor Emeritus, Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan Robert Cooney, Department of Surgery, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA

13:00-15:00 Room 1

1.

The State of Shock Society, US Ping Wang, Shock Society, USA and Center for Translational Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA

2.

The multifaceted modulation of monocytes functions in sepsis Reinaldo Salomao, Brazilian Shock Society (BSS) and Infectious Diseases, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

3.

The update of severe sepsis in China Yong-ming Yao, Chinese Shock Society (CSS) and Trauma Research Center, First Hospital Affiliated to the Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China

4.

European Shock Society: Past, present and future Jean-Marc Cavaillon, European Shock Society (ESS) and Cytokines & Inflammation Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France

5.

Present status and future perspective of Japan Shock Society Shigeto Oda, Japanese Shock Society (JSS) and Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan

Symposium 2 Sepsis and Trauma Associated Coagulopathy Chairs/Organizers Soheyl Bahrami, Experimental & Clinical Traumatology, Ludwig Boltzmann Institute; IFSS Council Member, IFSS President-Elect, Vienna, Austria Toshiaki Iba, Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan 1.

Circulating histones and coagulation disorder Toshiaki Iba, Department of Emergency and Disaster Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan

2.

Molecular Management in Polytrauma Markus Huber-Lang, Department of Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery, University Hospital of Ulm, Ulm, Germany

3.

The role of fibrinogen in acute trauma-induced coagulopathy: Novel insights and therapeutic options Herbert Schöchl, AUVA Trauma Centre Salzburg, Salzburg; Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Vienna, Austria

4.

The up-dated guideline for the clinical management of acute trauma hemorrhage and coagulopathy: The European perspective Marc Maegele, Department of Traumatology, Orthopedic Surgery and Sporttraumatology, Cologne-Merheim Medical Center (CMMC)/ University Witten-Herdecke (Germany), Cologne, Germany

5.

Coagulation abnormality during sepsis and acute pancreatitis in aged animals Hiroshi Saito, Department of Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA

6.

Experimentally approaching the Trauma-induced Coagulopathy Wenjun Martini, Hemostasis – Damage Control Resuscitation, US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Houston, TX, USA

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Program

‐as of 06/10/16‐subject to change

Monday, October 3, 2016 15:00-17:00 Room 1

Symposium 3 Persistent Inflammation, Immunosuppression and Catabolism Syndrome (PICS) Chairs/Organizers Lyle L. Moldawer, Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA Jean-Marc Cavaillon, Cytokines & Inflammation Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France

13:00-14:40 Room 2

1.

Persistent Inflammation, Immunosuppression and Catabolism Syndrome: A New Form of Chronic Critical Illness Lyle L. Moldawer, Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

2.

Concomitant inflammation and immunosuppression Jean-Marc Cavaillon, Cytokines & Inflammation Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France

3.

Bench to bedside research on critical illness myopathy (CIM) and ventilator induced diaphragm muscle dysfunction (VIDD): Mechanisms and interventions Lars G. Larsson, Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

4.

Influence of age on PICS Philip A. Efron, Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA

5.

Corticosteroids for sepsis; Brain dysfunction in sepsis; Vasopressor therapy for sepsis; and Fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients Djillali Annane, General Intensive Care Unit, Raymond Poincaré Hospital, University of Versailles SQY, Versailles, France

6.

Inflammation Associated Epigenetics and Metabolism: Novel Treatment Targets Charles E. McCall, Molecular Medicine, Wake Forest University Medical Center, Winston Salem, NC, USA

Symposium 4 Global Burden of Sepsis Chairs/Organizers Reinaldo Salomao, Infectious Diseases, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Toshiaki Ikeda, Intensive Care Medicine, Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan 1.

Current situation of diagnosis and treatment of sepsis in Japan Hiroyasu Ishikura, Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka, Japan

2.

The impact of Sepsis in USA Philip A. Efron, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

3.

Sepsis in developing countries Reinaldo Salomao, Infectious Diseases, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

4.

Novel Therapeutic Target for Sepsis Ping Wang, Center for Translational Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA

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Program

‐as of 06/10/16‐subject to change

Monday, October 3, 2016 14:40-15:40 Room 2

Symposium 5 Role of Alarmins in Shock and Sepsis Chairs/Organizers Timothy R. Billiar, Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Ping Wang, Center for Translational Research, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA

15:40-17:20 Room 2

1.

Targeting HMGB1 in the treatment of sepsis Haichao Wang, Laboratory of Emergency Medicine, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA

2.

Effect of High Mobility Group Box-1 Protein (HMGB1) on host immune response and its regulatory mechanism after major burns Yong-ming Yao, Trauma Research Center, First Hospital Affiliated to the Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China

3.

From Pamps and Alarmins to Tolerogens in Shock / Sepsis: What We Are Learning from Innate Regulatory Lymphocytes Alfred Ayala, Division of Surgical Research, Rhode Island Hospital; Department of Surgery, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA

Symposium 6 Sepsis and Shock: Painstaking Way to Comprehend and Treat Them Chairs/Organizers Marcin Osuchowski, Critical Care, Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology in AUVA Research Center, Vienna, Austria Satoshi Ono, Critical Cere Medicine, Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan 1.

Mouse sepsis models in the post-PNAS reality: Still viable or utterly helpless? Marcin Osuchowski, Critical Care, Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology in AUVA Research Center, Vienna, Austria

2.

Impact of immunosenescence on sepsis: T cell exhaustion and secondary infection after sepsis in the elderly Shigeaki Inoue, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa Japan

3.

Understanding the heterogeneity of the host response to infection may direct therapy Daniel Remick, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA

4.

Artesunate Protects against the Organ Injury and Dysfunction induced by Severe Hemorrhage and Resuscitation Chris Thiemermann, William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK

5.

The effective therapy using endotoxin tolerance against lethal septicemia Manabu Kinoshita, Immunology and Microbiology, National Defense Medical College, Saitama, Japan

page 4 of 9

Program

‐as of 06/10/16‐subject to change

Tuesday, October 4, 2016 8:30-10:30 Room 1

Symposium 7 Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Approach of Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome Chairs/Organizers Clifton W. Callaway, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Mayuki Aibiki, Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Ehime, Japan

10:30-12:30 Room 1

1.

Keyenote - Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome: The New Science Robert Neumar, Department of Emergency Medicine, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

2.

Molecular Mechanisms of Ischemic Brain Damage Hiroyuki Uchino, Department of Anesthesiology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan

3.

Post-cardiac arrest brain injury Clifton W. Callaway, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA

4.

Cardiologist's perspective of Post-cardiac arrest syndrome Shoji Kawakami, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan

5.

How to Provide the Cardioprotection for the Ischemic Heart – A Lesson from the J-WIND Trial – Masafumi Kitakaze, Department of Clinical Medicine and Development, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Osaka, Japan

Symposium 8 Blood Purification and ECMO for Sepsis and Septic Shock Chairs/Organizers Patrick Honore, Professor of ICU University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, Belgium Osamu Nishida, Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan 1.

ECMO in Septic shock: When to use it and not to use it? Tao-Min Huang, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan

2.

The Pathophysiology of AKI and the Rational for Blood Purification Hernando Gomez, Critical Care Medicine, Center for Critical Care Nephrology and The CRISMA Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

3.

Endotoxin adsorption therapy for septic shock Kent Doi, Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

4.

Immunomodulating Blood Purification System and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation Yoshitaka Hara, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan

5.

Continuous Hemodiafiltration with a Cytokine-Adsorbing Hemofilter in Patients with Septic Shock Hidetoshi Shiga, Emergency and Intensive Care Center, Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center, Chiba, Japan

6.

Adsorption therapy is the promising tool for sepsis and septic shock Patrick Honore, Professor of ICU University Hospital Brussels, Brussels, Belgium

page 5 of 9

Program

‐as of 06/10/16‐subject to change

Wednesday, October 5, 2016 10:40-11:40 Room 1

Plenary 2 Chair - Timothy G. Buchman, Critical Care Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Molecular Foundations of Bioelectronic Medicine Kevin J. Tracey, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA

page 6 of 9

Program

‐as of 06/10/16‐subject to change

Wednesday, October 5, 2016 13:00-15:00 Room 1

Symposium 9 Immunopathology of Traumatic Brain Injury Chairs/Organizers Irshad H. Chaudry, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Daniel Remick, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA

Basic science symposium on traumatic brain injury 1.

Alcohol-Neuroimmune Interactions in Traumatic Brain Injury Patricia E. Molina, Department of Physiology and Alcohol & Drug Abuse Center of Excellence, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA

2.

Traumatic brain injury induces apoptosis and exhaustion of T cells with increased mortality after sepsis Shigeaki Inoue, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa Japan

3.

The role of innate immunity in the traumatic brain injury-induced immune suppression syndrome Steven J. Schwulst, Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA

4.

Estrogens for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury Irshad H. Chaudry, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA

Clinical/translational science symposium on traumatic brain injury

15:00-17:00 Room 1

5.

Monitoring and Treatment Strategies for Physiopathological Responses in Severe TBI: A Primary to Cuaternary Injury Approach Andres Mariano Rubiano Escobar, Neurosurgery, Neuroscience Research Institute, El Bosque University, Bogota, Colombia

6.

Development of a stretch-induced neurotrauma model for medium-throughput screening in vitro: Identification of rifampicin as a neuroprotectant Csaba Szabo, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA

7.

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury but not Tail Trauma Augments Pulmonary Clearance of Bacteria via Release of Substance P Daniel Remick, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA

Symposium 10 Critical Illness and the Gut Chairs/Organizers Craig Coopersmith, Emory Critical Care Center and Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Joji Kotani, Hyogo College of Medicine, Emergency, Disaster and Critical Care Center, Hyogo, Japan 1.

Gut epithelial integrity and sepsis Craig Coopersmith, Emory Critical Care Center and Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA

2.

Nutrition Management of Critically Ill Patients: Evidences and Practice Joji Kotani, Hyogo College of Medicine, Emergency, Disaster and Critical Care Center, Hyogo, Japan

3.

Dynamic changes of gut microbiota in critically ill patients Kentaro Shimizu, Department of Traumatology and Acute Critical Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan

4.

Application of therapeutic medical gas for bowel dysfunction Atsunori Nakao, Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan

5.

Toll-like receptor stimulation reverses antibiotic-induced gut defense impairment Lee-Wei Chen, Department of Surgery, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung; Institute of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan

page 7 of 9

Program

‐as of 06/10/16‐subject to change

Wednesday, October 5, 2016 13:00-15:00 Room 2

Symposium 11 Background Mechanisms of Major Surgery-Induced Septic Complications Chairs/Organizers Yuko Kitagawa, Department of Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Masao Miyashita, Department of Surgery, Nippon Medical School Chiba Hokusoh Hospital, Chiba, Japan 1.

BACKGROUND MECHANISM OF MAJOR SURGERY-INDUCED SEPTIC COMPLICATIONS Kyaw Htet, Department of GI and HBP Surgery, No. 2 Defence Services General Hospital, Nay Pyi Taw, Myanmar

2.

Selective management of unexpected complication by delayed surgical management of esophageal perforation and therapeutic endoscopy Sirikan Limpakan (Yamada), Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery and Endoscopy, Department of Surgery, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand

3.

Chemokine-chemokine receptor network and esophagectomy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma Hiroya Takeuchi, Department of Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

4.

Immunological evaluation of the postoperative complications after esophagectomy Hironori Tsujimoto, Department of Surgery, National Defense Medical College, Saitama, Japan

5.

The predictive role of lipid mediators for postoperative complications after gastrointestinal surgery Akihisa Matsuda, Department of Surgery, Nippon Medical School Chiba Hokusoh Hospital, Chiba, Japan

6.

Background of Major Hepato-biliary-pancreatic Surgery-induced Sepsis Yu Katayose, Surgery, Tohoku Rosai Hospital, Miyagi, Japan

7.

Liver failure after major hepatectomy: Diagnosis and therapeutic interventions Itaru Endo, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Yokohama City University, Kanagawa, Japan

8.

Relationship between surgical stress induced hyperglycemia and septic complications: What is optimal perioperative glycemic control? Kazuhiro Hanazaki, Department of Surgery, Kochi Medical School, Kochi, Japan

page 8 of 9

Program

‐as of 06/10/16‐subject to change

Wednesday, October 5, 2016 15:00-17:00 Room 2

Symposium 12 Microcirculation and Endothelial Damage in Sepsis and Shock Chairs/Organizers E. Christiaan Boerma, Department of Intensive Care, Medical Center Leeuwarden, Leeuwarden; Department of Translational Physiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Toshishige Shibamoto, Department of Physiology II, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa, Japan 1.

The potential of near-infrared spectroscopy as an index of pivotal organs and tissue oxygenation in critically ill patients Yasuyuki Kakihana, Department of Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine, Kagoshima University Hospital, Kagoshima, Japan

2.

Capillary recruitment during fluid resuscitation is limited in sepsis E. Christiaan Boerma, Department of Intensive Care, Medical Center Leeuwarden, Leeuwarden; Department of Translational Physiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

3.

The role of arginine vasopressin receptors in microvascular hyper-permeability during septic shock Perenlei Enkhbaatar, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA

4.

Integrin-mediated cross talk between coagulation and inflammation Motomu Shimaoka, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie, Japan

5.

S1P2, a receptor for the lysophospholipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate, protects against vascular barrier disruption Yasuo Okamoto, Department of Physiology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Ishikawa; Department of Pharmacology, Kawasaki Medical University, Okayama, Japan

6.

Glycocalyx, 'missing' link between endothelium and microcirculation Christa Boer, Department of Anesthesiology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

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