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Published by the DA- Agricultural Training Institute, Elliptical Road, Diliman Quezon City, Philippines Printed in the Republic of the Philippines Philippine Copyright 2017 by the Agricultural Training Institute (ATI) All rights reserved. No parts of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any forms of by any means without permission in writing from ATI. All information that will be lifted from this material should be cited properly. ISSN: 2546-0676

TABLE OF CONTENTS iii

Abbreviations and Acronyms

v

Message from the Director

1

Executive Summary

2 5 6

10 11 12 13 14

How We Work Our Mandates and Functions Our Organizational Structure Challenges to the Institution Our Desired Future and How to Get There Our Vision, Mission and Core Values Agriculture and Fisheries Extension Development Framework Agriculture and Fisheries Extension Thematic Programs Ladderized Approach to Extension Services Objectives, Strategies and Performance Measures Strategic Goal 1: Enhanced Access to Agriculture and Fisheries Extension Knowledge Products and Services Strategic Goal 2: Strengthened Competitiveness and Capacities of Agriculture and Fishery Sector Strategic Goal 3: Expanded Partnerships in Advancing Excellency in Agriculture and Fishery Extension Delivery Strategic Goal 4: Scaled-Up AFE Innovations Strategic Goal 5: Strengthened Agriculture and Fisheries Extension Stakeholders’ Capacity in Climate Change Resilience Strategic Goal 6: Improved Enabling Environment and Quality of Governance

33 34 35 39 40

Proposed Budget Allocation Monitoring and Evaluation Acknowledgement References Annex

LIST OF FIGURES 6 11 12 13 34 41

Figure 1. ATI’s Organizational Chart Figure 2. ATI’s Vision, Mission and Core Values Figure 3. AFE Strategic Framework Figure 4. Ladderized Approach to Extension Services Figure 5. Process Flow Diagram of ATI Monitoring System Figure 6. The AFE Theory of Change Model

LIST OF TABLES 33

Table 1. Proposed Budget Allocation for FY 2017-2022, Per Fund Source

LIST OF ANNEX 33

Table 1. Proposed Budget Allocation for FY 2017-2022, Per Fund Source

ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS 4-H AEW AF AFE AFMech AFMA Agripreneurs ARB ASK ATI CSO DA DRRM EDEN EDS ESP EO FCC GAP GHP GMP GREEN HACCP IDP IEC IP ISO ICT LeAD Center LEGS LGU LSPA M&E MS NC

Head, Heart, Hands and Health Agricultural Extension Worker Agriculture and Fisheries Agriculture and Fisheries Extension Agriculture and Fisheries Mechanization Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Act Agricultural Entrepreneurs Agrarian Reform Beneficiaries Attitude, Skills and Knowledge Agricultural Training Institute Civil Society Organization Department of Agriculture Disaster Risk Reduction Management Extension Disaster Education Network Extension Delivery System Extension Service Provider Executive Order Farmers’ Call Centers Good Agricultural Practices Good Handling Practices Good Manufacturing Practices Generating Resources for Rural Empowerment and Enhancement in Nutrition Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points Internally Displaced Person Information, Education and Communication Indigenous People International Organization for Standardization Information Communication Technology Learning and Discovery Center Livestock Emergency Guidelines Standards Local Government Unit Learning Site for Practical Agriculture Monitoring and Evaluation Magsasakang Siyentista National Certificate

iii

NEP NESAF NGA NGO PAA PhilEASNet PhilGEPS PWD PME PO PPAs RA RBMES RBO RIC SUCs TM WFP

National Expenditure Program National Extension System for Agriculture and Fisheries National Government Agency Non-Government Organization Philippine Association of Agriculturists Philippine Extension and Advisory Services Network, Inc. Philippine Government Electronic Procurement System Person with Disability Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Private Organization Programs, Projects and Activities Republic Act Results-Based Monitoring and Evaluation System Rural-Based Organization Rural Improvement Club State Universities and Colleges Training Methodology Work and Financial Plan

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MESSAGE FROM THE

DIRECTOR The ATI Corporate Plan for FY 2017-2022 presents the five-year direction of where our Institute desires to go and what we want to achieve. This is timely response to cope with the present dynamic environmental and political modifications. This is a vital plan that will enable us to formulate strategies to efficiently and effectively utilize our resources in order to generate optimum results for the greater good. Despite the increasing sector demands, the Institute has been constantly responding to the needs of the stakeholders, especially to smallhold farmers and fisherfolk. However, the incremental decline of Filipino people engaged in farming and fishing may endanger our agriculture sector in the long run. Thus, we need to do more in expanding our horizons to advocate programs and projects relative to agriculture and fisheries through quality extension services. This will serve as an instrument for us to identify and evaluate avenues that needs to be emphasized and strengthened. Similarly, on the corporate level, investment on the Institute’s human resources should also be amplified. This is not only to advance their education but likewise their welfare and personal development. This is the greatest piece of asset an institution must focus on as success depends on how well its people manages all other resources within the system. As I look forward in serving this Institute for the next three years, I would like to extend my warmest appreciation to all who vested their time and shared their expertise throughout the series of consultations, drafting and finally the publication of this document. It is indeed an honor for me to lead this institution to its successful implementation of development programs, projects and activities. May we all continue to reach out and make positive difference in the lives of our program beneficiaries, serving them beyond boundaries and raising the bar of excellence in their way of life.

LUZ A. TAPOSOK, PhD Director

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The growth and development of agricultural extension has always been a factor in agricultural innovation. The Bureau of Agricultural Extension (BAEx) was created in 1952 with the purpose of implementing agricultural extension programs designed for farm management, home management and rural youth development. However, EO 116 in 1987 merged the BAEx and other agricultural training agencies of the government and formed the Agricultural Training Institute (ATI) mandating the training of all agricultural stakeholders, especially farmers, and ensuring that research results are communicated through appropriate training and extension activities. The Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Act (AFMA) in 1997 further expanded ATI’s mandate as the overall manager of agriculture and fisheries (A&F) training and extension in the country. The Institute currently has fifteen (15) Regional Training Centers (RTCs) and one (1) International Training Center (specifically for pig husbandry) with technical sections parallel to the existing technical divisions in the Central Office (i.e. Career Development and Management, Information Services, Partnerships and Accreditation, and Policy and Planning). As one of the driving forces in the country’s agriculture sector, the institution’s internal development is essential to further cope with technological, educational, socio-economic and political dynamics. Thus, strengthening the factors that are endogenous to the institution − People/Manpower, Physical Assets, Financial Resources, Culture, Systems, and Institutional Linkages. These are necessary to efficiently and effectively execute its functions and deliver quality extension services. Anchored on the Department of Agriculture’s current thrusts and advocacies, ATI envisions food availability and affordability for every Filipino family through leadership and excellence in agriculture and fishery extension services by the end of 2022. This can only be attained through various extension interventions in the Thematic Programs and a ladderized approach to extension services (Figure 4). In effect, farmers and other A&F stakeholders will gain improved attitude, skills and knowledge (ASK) leading to the achievement of a competitive and sustainable A&F sector in an equitable and livable environment. Subsequently, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of these programs are essential to determine whether programs, projects and activities (PPAs) are relevant and effective. The establishment of a standard M&E scheme enables the Institute to develop “correctionary” measures to ensure the smooth implementation of its PPAs. As modern M&E mechanisms are now gearing towards results-based approach, ATIs method of PPA M&E will be anchored on the National Extension System for Agriculture and Fisheries (NESAF) Results-Based Monitoring and Evaluation System (RBMES) which will focus on assessing whether the identified targeted interventions were accomplished and the desired results were achieved.

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HOW WE WORK Our Mandate

Executive Order No. 116 series of 1987: “Renaming the Ministry of Agriculture and Food as Ministry of Agriculture, Reorganizing its units, Integrating all offices and agencies whose functions relate to Agriculture and Fishery into the Ministry and for other purposes” By virtue of EO 116, s. 1987, the ATI shall be responsible for the training of all agricultural extension workers and their clientele, who are mostly farmers and other agricultural workers, ensure that training programs address the real needs of the agricultural sector, and ensure that the research results are then communicated to the farmers through the appropriate training and extension activities.

Republic Act 8435 series of 1997: “Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Act of 1997” RA 8435, s. 1997 strengthened the role of ATI as the DA’s extension and training arm and overall manager of A&F training and extension of the country. Moreover, it expanded the scope of A&F extension to training services, farm and business advisory services, demonstration services and information, education and communication (IEC) support services through tri-media.

Rationalization Plan (October 10, 2013) Pursuant to Executive Order No. 338, s. 2001, the Institute implemented the Rationalization Plan and reiterated the mandated functions of ATI as follows: • Lead in the formulation of the National Agriculture and Fisheries Extension (AFE) Agenda and Budget; • Prepare an integrated plan for publicly-funded training programs in agriculture and fisheries; • Formulate and issue guidelines in planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating AFE programs; and • Assist in the coordination with State Universities and Colleges (SUCs), the Local Government Units’ (LGUs) extension system by improving their effectiveness and efficiency through capability building and complementary extension activities such as technical assistance, training of personnel, improvement of physical facilities, extension cum research and information support services.

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Special Issuances

Executive Order No. 801, s. 2009. ATI to link DA’s extension program to the extension delivery modalities under the Techno Gabay Program, extension program of SUCs, LGUs and other agencies; provide access to online-database of DA on e-learning courses and other agricultural information; and complement manpower and logistic support in the conduct of training and education of LGU personnel who will be involved in the joint undertaking. Administrative Order No. 28, s. 2008. As the apex agency for a unified and efficient agriculture and fisheries extension system, ATI shall take the lead role in the implementation of extension programs of the DA, including the management of extension funds to ensure that extension services achieve optimum results. Department Administrative Order No. 22, s. 2008. To harness the resources and expertise of the private sector, the ATI shall accredit private extension service providers (ESPs). They shall be commissioned and provided funding by the DA through the ATI to undertake complementary extension services for farmers, fishers and other stakeholders under mutually agreed terms and conditions. Department Administrative Order No. 3, s. 2007. Lead in the provision of electronicextension (e-Extension) services in collaboration with the various agencies, bureaus and organizational units of the Department of Agriculture. Department Administrative Order No. 9, s. 2005. Shift in the role of ATI as an indirect provider of extension services. ATI shall focus its roles as indirect provider of extension and training services to LGU extension workers including those from DA attached agencies and other public/ private entities, to complement the LGUs’ responsibility of delivering direct A&F extension services to farmers, fishers etc. Department Administrative Order No. 9, s. 2002. As the National Secretariat and overall coordinator in the management and supervision of the revitalization and sustaining activities of Rural-Based Organizations (RBOs) like 4-H Clubs, Rural Improvement Clubs (RICs), and farmer-organizations.

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Functions

• Lead in the formulation of the National Agriculture and Fisheries Extension (AFE) Agenda and Budget; • Prepare an integrated plan for publicly-funded training programs in A&F; • Advise the DA in managing financial and logistical support for AFE; • Formulate and issue guidelines in planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating AFE programs; • Assist, in coordination with SUCs, and the LGUs extension system by improving their effectiveness and efficiency through capability building and complementary extension activities such as technical assistance, training of personnel, improvement of physical facilities, extension cum research, and information support services. • Lead in the professionalization of Agricultural Extension Workers (AEWs) through the implementation of an integrated and a ladderized human capital development for public extension services; development of relevant curricula for innovative extension services; and adoption of a merit, promotion and incentive system as well as management of scholarships for AEWs and farmers’ children; • Serve as the frontrunner for an information and communication technology (ICT) - based knowledge management system to provide distance learning modalities that will connect AEWs and other stakeholders along a technology-based value extension service chain via e-learning courses, farmers’ call center (FCC) and other ICT enabled extension strategies, and manage information into appropriate knowledge products and services; • Responsible for the establishment of national (with SUCs, civil society organizations [CSOs], people’s organizations [POs], LGUs, etc.) and international partnership agreements to motivate and boost public-public and public-private networks in ESPs; and the provision of grants for extension projects as well as the conduct of compliance monitoring of recipients of grants and co-financing agreements; • Spearhead extension policy development and standards-setting; strategic extension systems planning, monitoring and evaluation; and formulation of an extension agenda and programs for the national and regional levels; • Initiate field based extension systems and implement phased-training program schemes for AEWs and RBOs in their respective areas of operation in accordance with national guidelines and standards, as well as provide technical assistance to LGUs and private ESPs; and • Provide capacity building activities for local, national and foreign executives, agricultural extension workers and other clients through the conduct of multi-level training courses and other extension-related activities in pig husbandry.

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Our Organizational Structure

The ATI is composed of four (4) technical divisions, all under the Office of the Director (OD), which are mandated to assert the ATI’s role as the orchestrator of the NESAF. There are two (2) units within the OD - the Administrative and Finance Unit (AFU) that caters to the administrative and finance services of the Institute and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Office that is in charge of the M&E of office standards and processes. The Policy and Planning Division (PPD) spearheads the extension policy development and standard setting; strategic extension systems planning, monitoring and evaluation; and formulation of an extension agenda and programs at the national and regional levels. The Information Services Division (ISD), on the other hand, serves as the frontrunner for an ICT-based knowledge management system to provide distance learning modalities which connects AEWs and other stakeholders along a technology-based value extension service via e-learning courses, farmers’ call center and other ICT enabled extension strategies; and manage information into appropriate knowledge products and services. The Career Development and Management Division (CDMD) leads in the professionalization of AEWs through the implementation of an integrated and a ladderized human capital development for public extension services; development of relevant curricula for innovative extension services; and adoption of a merit, promotion and incentive system as well as management of scholarships for AEWs and farmers’ children. Lastly, Partnerships ad Accreditation Division (PAD) is responsible for the establishment of national (SUCs, CSOs, POs, LGUs, etc.) and international partnership agreements to motivate and boost public-public and publicprivate networks in carrying out extension programs; the accreditation of ESPs; and the provision of grants for extension projects as well as the conduct of compliance monitoring of recipients of grants and co-financing agreements. The 15 RTCs including the International Training Center on Pig Husbandry (ITCPH), also under the OD, are mandated to initiate field-based extension systems and implement phased-training program schemes for AEWs and RBOs in their respective areas of operation in accordance to the national guidelines and standards, as well as provide technical assistance to LGUs and private ESPs.

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Figure 1. ATI’s Organizational Chart

Challenges to the Institution

With the dynamic global market demand, advancements in the extension services should be able to satisfy and enhance A&F stakeholders. With these external changes, ATI as an institution must ensure that it exhibits internal progress to address and cope with technological, educational, socio-economic and political dynamics. However, underlying factors that are endogenous to the institution − People/ Manpower, Physical Assets, Financial Resources, Culture, Systems, and Institutional Linkages − are vital inputs that may defer or expedite the execution of its functions and in the delivery of extension services. Despite maximum efforts in reaching out and building capacities of farmers and fishers, ATI seems to reflect an image of deficiency as lead agency for training and extension. This was caused by the endogenous factors mentioned. This has led to the following: 1) non-harmonization of A&F extension program management; 2) hesitant and insecure smallholder farmers to partner with the Centers; 3) limited delivery of services to clients; 4) insufficient support mechanism; 5) decreased credibility/ marketability; 6) limited complementation of programs with other extension agencies; and 7) insufficient networking.

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Core Problem: INSTITUTIONAL DEFICIENCY AS LEAD AGENCY FOR TRAINING AND EXTENSION

Causes: 1) People/ Manpower a) Human Resource Development i) Delineation of functions not followed (1) Lack of recognition of Divisions’ mandate ii) Lack of competency and technical confidence of newly hired staff (1) Inability to capacitate staff on required/ needed specialization iii) Insufficient number of technical and administrative staff (1) Unfilled plantilla positions (2) Limited support staff for special concerns iv) Lack of HRD Plan (1) Absence of reward system for high performers 2) Physical Assets a) Geographical location (for some centers) i) Disaster risk area of training center (1) Security of land tenure of ATI’s training complex b) Facilities i) Poor working environment (e.g. ventilation, internet, connection, electrical connectivity, leaking ceilings, etc.) (1) Poor implementation of Physical Development Plan (infrastructure, vehicle, equipment, etc.) (2) Need for building upgrades and inclusion of furniture and fixtures ii) Failure to provide comfort rooms and ramps for PWDs (for some centers)

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3) Financial Resources a) Poor Absorptive Capacity i) Downloading of funds do not follow Monthly Cash Program (MCP) (1) No breakdown of cash program from NTA ii) Weak monitoring system in terms of financial resources iii) Delayed implementation in the Work and Financial Plan (WFP) (1) Re-alignment of budget due to change in WFP (2) PHILGEPS requirement delays transactions iv) Liquidation (1) Late liquidation of cash advances (more than 30 days) and noncompliance in the breakdown of liquidation reports

4) Culture a) Inadequate Corporate Branding i) Poor results/ outputs dissemination (1) No regular press releases to local dailies (2) High cost of outsourcing media services (e.g. radio, television, etc.) ii) Insufficient initiatives for branding (1) Weak media relations 5) Systems a) Regulatory Compliance i) Weak and not updated Monitoring and Evaluation System (1) Weak Extension and Training Evaluation (a) Limited knowledge on evaluation (2) Inability to capture results/ outcomes of extension activities (a) Difficulty in report/ information generation (i) Lack of database for baselining (ii) Absence of field monitoring for validation

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b) Policies and Guidelines i) Weak implementation of system standard (1) Change in direction/ thrusts/ policies/ programs (2) Changing political landscapes ii) Lack of harmonization of guidelines between Central Office and Regional Training Centers (1) Non-observance of office protocols iii) Leadership/ Management Concerns (1) Top to bottom management style (2) Political interventions to programs and projects 6) Institutional Linkages a) Communication Issues i) Weak communication among other institutions (1) Internal communication issues within the Divisions and Centers (2) Poor corporate communication (i.e. not updated website, not updated corporate materials) (3) Some LGUs are not supportive to ATI’s PPAs (a) Insufficient and aging number of LGU AEWs

Effects: `

1) No harmonized management of Agri-Fishery Extension Program; 2) Hesitant and insecure smallholder farmers to partner with center; 3) Poor delivery of services to clients; 4) Insufficiencies in support mechanism; 5) Decreased credibility/ marketability; 6) Limited complementation of programs with other extension agencies; 7) Insufficient networking.

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OUR

DESIRED FUTURE AND HOW TO GET THERE

Vision Statement Food availability and affordability for every Filipino family through excellent extension services in agriculture and fisheries.

Mission Statement Empowerment and building capacities of agriculture and fisheries stakeholders for sustainable development.

Core Values The Institute supports the government’s objectives of accountability, transparency, ethics and integrity for the ATI through active promotion of the ATI’s Core Values. The Institute’s core values direct the way we relate to our stakeholders and to each other.

The ATI employees adheres and upholds the following values: Customer Focus - “We give the best” Commitment -

“We serve with passion”

Innovation and Excellence - “We keep raising the bar” Resource Stewardship - “We work with integrity and teamwork”

Slogan

Excellent extension services beyond boundaries.

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and am

te

wo

rk

Figure 2. ATI’s Vision, Mission and Core Values

AFE Development Framework Consistent with the strategic framework of the NESAF, the AFE development framework is anchored on the six (6) thematic programs. These programs cover the four (4) broadly stated extension functions and services under the AFMA such as training, technology demonstration services, farm and business advisory services and IEC support, gearing towards themes that are timely and highly significant. The three (3) pillars of AFE system − LGUs, National Government Agencies (NGAs) along with SUCs, and the Private Sector − serve as the main actors in the delivery of AFE programs in the country. Efficient and effective implementation and delivery of these programs translate to enhanced competency of farmers and fishers in terms of improved levels of ASK. As a result, they become more productive and empowered individuals collectively contributing to the development of their communities. The enhancement of capabilities of clients enables them to competently respond and address challenges of changing trends and conditions in the A&F sector. Productivity and empowerment contributes to the achievement of a more competitive and sustainable A&F sector leading to the attainment of food security, poverty alleviation, social equity, and sustainable development. Continuous M&E, on the other hand, provides an assessment whether these programs are consistent in delivering the optimum desired results. M&E also enables enhancement of programs vis-à-vis technological, educational, socio-economic and political dynamics.

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Figure 3. AFE Strategic Framework

AFE Thematic Programs The thematic programs translate the four (4) broadly stated extension functions and services of the AFMA - training, technology demonstration, farm and business advisory services, and IEC support services. These are meant to cover all aspects of agricultural extension which can further contribute in making food available and affordable to every Filipino family. • Enhancing Access to AFE Knowledge Products and Services. This program deals with different extension clients/stakeholders’ need for fast access of up-to-date agriculture and agriculture-related information and knowledge. It includes development, translation, packaging and distribution of knowledge products through multimedia (i.e. print, broadcast, television and internet) and all other modes of communication that fit the specific client system. • Strengthening Competitiveness and Capacity of the A&F Sector. Also called “capability building program for various clients.” This program generally aims to capacitate stakeholders and organized groups at various levels (e.g. farmers/ fishers, and all actors along the value chain as well as the enablers such as the extension workers, subject matter specialists, experts, extension managers, etc.) with ASK to achieve specific development objectives and goals. This can be accomplished through training, education and provision of advisory services. • Expanding Partnerships in Advancing Excellence in AFE Delivery. This program supports initiatives of extension agencies to forge linkages with other agencies for collaborative undertaking. The purpose of partnerships is to expand the reach of extension services geographically to various clients/stakeholders. Likewise, this is to address common issues affecting effective and efficient delivery of extension services.

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• Scaling-Up AFE Innovations. This program aims to develop new extension modalities, methodologies, and approaches that are fit to the changing extension contexts. After proven effective through pilot implementation, these are institutionalized and become regular extension interventions that fall under other Thematic Programs. • Strengthening AFE Stakeholders’ Capacity in Climate Change Resilience. This is a program that addresses the extension needs of stakeholders affected by the adverse impacts of climate change. It aims to develop their capability to withstand or adapt to adverse conditions. It also covers stakeholders who are potential victims or casualties by the impending strike of adverse changing climate conditions by providing them extension services to boost their preparedness. Extension interventions include services that may cut across all other Thematic Programs. • Improving Enabling Environment and Quality of Governance. This Program deals with the need of extension agencies for policy support, planning, M&E mechanisms, budget, infrastructure, and facilities.

Ladderized Approach to Extension Services A ladderized approach is a key strategy of ATI in assisting ordinary farmers to eventually elevate as agriculture entrepreneurs or agripreneurs. Small-scale farmers and stakeholders are capacitated by the Institute in developing further their skills, and in increasing their competencies, knowledge and attitude in farming. From trainees, they are guided to become learning site cooperators serving walk-in clients and using their farm as the site for handson instruction/learning activities. The next step is to capacitate them to become teachers or lecturers with their farm as the school that accommodates co-farmers, scholars and others who are interested to learn agriculture or farming. At the top the ladder, farmers become more empowered as they cater not only to students and co-farmers but including tourists.

Figure 4. Ladderized Approach to Extension Services

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Objectives, Strategies and Performance Indicators

STRATEGIC GOAL 1: Enhanced Access to AFE Knowledge Products and Services “Serbisyo’y Palawigin: Kaalaman at Kakayahan ng Bawat Mamamayan Pagyamanin”

Improving clients’ access to A&F data, information, and knowledge increases the efficiency and effectiveness of the delivery of extension services. We continuously seek to provide every stakeholder along the value chain a better-quality extension service and enable them to access data, information, and knowledge everywhere, anytime at their own pace. As technological innovations have evolved the schemes of providing extension services, we have utilized various ICTs for the advancement of our stakeholders. Through the use of ICT, the farmers and fishers as well as their families are linked to the best technical advice, data and information available locally, and even globally, to cope with issues along the supply and value chain. The sustainability of the agriculture sector greatly depends on how agricultural extension was efficiently and effectively delivered to small-holder farmers, fishers and their families to increase or sustain their production at the micro level. Hence, our priorities have progressed into providing technical assistance to all stakeholders (including private sector and NGOs) in using technologies to improve rural livelihood and communities. Actions for the attainment of this objective include coordinating/conducting ICT related training programs on A&F, producing extension materials for A&F, and promoting training in formal and non-formal communication skills. We also aim to penetrate all channels to hasten the communication of data and information to stakeholders.

Thematic Result 1: Empowered stakeholders and clients with information and knowledge for improved productivity and income

Objectives: 1.1.

Intensify use of high-impact alternative extension modalities to serve a greater number of stakeholders 1.1.1. Promote AFE projects and activities through national/local television, radio programs and various media 1.1.2. Enhance promotion of e-learning courses through institutionalizing e-learning courses with SUCs; integrating to regular trainings; introducing to senior high school students and other stakeholders

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1.1.3. Participate in agri-fair exhibits 1.1.4. Conduct “agri-talk program” at barangay, municipal, and provincial levels 1.1.5. Develop electronic and mobile applications for A&F 1.1.6. Establish an e-community of knowledge centers 1.1.7. Promote Livestock Knowledge Center 1.1.8. Promote various ICT tools for A&F such as e-extension, Rice Crop Manager (RCM), rice knowledge bank, etc. 1.1.9. Promote AFE to national/local tabloid and newspapers, local cable channels; community radios, among other media 1.2.

Develop and distribute quality and useful knowledge products 1.2.1. Prepare and publicize IEC such as brochures, leaflets, information kits, etc. on commodities and programs 1.2.2. Provide IEC materials to government and school libraries 1.2.3. Promote knowledge products through E-mobile 1.2.4. Develop and disseminate newsletters

1.3.

Document and share various good agriculture and fishery practices 1.3.1. Upload relevant AFE based videos in Youtube 1.3.2. Write success stories/testimonials

1.4.

Develop and manage information systems that facilitate decision making, knowledge sharing and linking producers and consumers to market 1.4.1. Enhance connectivity and mobile interface 1.4.2. Develop and promote mobile applications to link producers and market 1.4.3. Organize communities of practice and communities of interest to facilitate knowledge sharing

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STRATEGIC GOAL 2: Strengthened Competitiveness and Capacities of Agriculture and Fishery Sector “Tamang Kaalaman: Susi sa Kaunlaran ng Kanayunan”

In most developing nations, agriculture is still considered to be the major factor in reducing poverty and increasing the security of livelihood. However, the diverse challenges for the rural poor continue to grow. These include potential conflicts over increasing food and water, bioenergy resources competing with crop production thus putting extreme pressure on food commodities, and changing landscape of urban-rural migration.

For the past 15 years, the Philippine agriculture sector accounts only about 12 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP) despite its wide-range of agricultural resources. This implies that in spite of nearly abundant resources, the country cannot reach its optimum resource utilization due to various factors. This issue might be explained by the deficiency of agricultural knowledge and skills supplied to end-users. The skills to improve productivity to attain maximum output, increase adaptability to deal with change and crisis, and facilitate the expansion of livelihoods to manage risks is deemed critical in rural areas. In many cases, these skills are an issue of survival. Providing these skills effectively is one of our key challenges as we are the DAs extension and training arm. Thus, empowering our extension workers who serve our smallholder farmers is needed. These AEWs need continuous education, training, encouragement and support to ensure that A&F research results which includes new and modern production technologies that will sustainably increase productivity will be properly communicated to the farmers through appropriate training and extension activities.

Thematic Result 2:

Capacitated stakeholders and clients to improve productivity and income

Objectives: 2.1.

Professionalize Philippine extension service 2.1.1.

Capability building and education support 2.1.1.1.

Provide degree and non-degree scholarships to deserving extension workers

2.1.1.2.

Develop appropriate curricula, standards and certification scheme

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2.1.2.

2.2.

2.1.1.3.

Conduct ladderized courses (induction training, facilitation skills, training management) for new AEWs

2.1.1.4.

Conduct refresher/continuous education/training of agricultural and fishery extension workers

Professionalize agriculture and fishery workers 2.1.2.1.

Comply with agriculture or fishery licensure examinations and/ or National Certificate (NC) and Training Methodology (TM) assessments from TESDA for agriculture and fishery extension workers

2.1.2.2.

Membership in professional extension organizations for agriculture fishery extension workers

2.1.2.3.

Participate in other development activities

2.1.2.3.

Implement merit-based incentives and awards system for high performing AEWs

2.1.2.4.

Organize review classes on Licensure Examination for Agriculture and Fishery Officers for deserving AEWs

Build-up competencies of the AFE client system through appropriate and relevant training and education support 2.2.1.

Capacitate stakeholders along the value chain through training, coaching and mentoring 2.2.1.1.

AF appreciation courses for Local Chief Executives/Newly Elected Officials

2.2.1.2.

Training Standards

2.2.1.3.

High Value commodities (crops, fisheries, livestock and poultry and others) or Regional Community Champions;

2.2.1.4.

Pests and diseases management

2.2.1.5.

Farm management, agribusiness and entrepreneurship

2.2.1.6.

Production technology of various commodities

2.2.1.7.

Post-harvest technologies, processing, value adding, marketing and retailing

2.2.1.8.

Food safety and standards such as Halal, good agriculture practices (GAP), good manufacturing practices (GMP), phytosanitary measures and hazard analysis and control points (HACCP) compliance

2.2.1.9.

Healthy food systems and appropriate consumption practices for consumers

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2.2.1.10. Proper ecological waste management 2.2.1.11. Animal welfare 2.2.1.12. Values enhancement and social technologies relevant to their needs 2.2.1.13. Health and wellness 2.2.1.14. Agripreneurship, Agri-cator and Agri-tecture 2.2.1.15. Consumer advocacy (food safety, food wastage, etc.) 2.2.2. Establish learning sites exhibiting latest A&F technologies and practices 2.2.3. Provide degree and non-degree scholarships for deserving clients 2.2.4. Implement ladderized courses, NC and TM from TESDA, for the client system 2.2.5. Organize community of practices for focus commodities for knowledge sharing and generation 2.2.6. Strengthen existing RBOs participation in A&F development (Magsasakang Siyentista, Farmers Association, RICs, and 4H clubs, Indigenous People); 2.2.7. Implement A&F mechanization and engineering training and extension programs under the A&F mechanization (AFMech) law 2.2.8. Intensify extension support to marginalized sector, the depressed, excluded and vulnerable such as the Indigenous People (IPs), Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Persons with Disabilities (PWDs), senior citizens, rebel returnees, women, out-of-school youth and Agrarian Reform Beneficiaries (ARBs)

2.3.

Intensify provision of farm and business advisory services 2.3.1.

Strengthen/organize communities of interests and practices;

2.3.2. Organize AFE knowledge circles/advisory committees involving extension stakeholders at all levels 2.3.3. Provide consultancy services and technical assistance to clients 2.3.4. Provide marketing related advisory

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STRATEGIC GOAL 3: Expanded Partnerships in Advancing Excellence in Agriculture and Fishery Extension Delivery “Sama Sama’t Kapit Bisig: Progreso ay Maaatim”

The empowerment of the small farmers largely depends on the efficient dissemination of technologies and the efficient delivery of extension services by the government. However, with the growing need for extension services around the country, we need to look at the multiplicity of players and actors involved in extension. Hence, establishing and strengthening linkages with other partner agencies in advancing excellence in extension delivery becomes imperative to achieve this. The pluralistic nature of extension delivery system (EDS) in the country must be taken advantage. The critical role of the government in this pluralistic nature of EDS would be to provide appropriate regulatory framework to ensure fair competition and maintain quality standards. Unnecessary duplication of services for the same clientele groups that sap scarce resources can be avoided by improving partnerships that will assure proper coordination of PPAs. Likewise, maximum utilization as well as complementation of resources can be attained. It also ensures a unified approach on the management of extension, while banking on partnerships to source out complementary resources for worthy interventions.

Thematic Result 3: • Harmonized delivery of AFE services among AFE service providers • Adequate AFE services delivered to clients

Objectives: 3.1.

Strengthen research and development, market and extension linkages 3.1.1. Fortify the AFE Network (AFEN) or the Regional AFE Network (RAFEN)

3.1.2.

3.1.1.1.

Conduct quarterly meeting

3.1.1.2.

Conduct of symposium

Reinforce linkages with SUCs and research institutions

3.1.3. Commercialize matured technologies 3.1.3.1.

Conduct of Training of Trainers (TOTs)/Package of Technology;

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3.1.3.2.

Distribute IEC materials

3.1.4. Strengthen ESPs in the utilization of matured technologies 3.1.4.1.

Conduct training

3.1.4.2.

Conduct experiential learning journey

3.1.5. Build-up stakeholders on marketing / marketing structures

3.2.

Intensify joint ventures and convergence initiatives between public-public and publicprivate sectors 3.2.1.

Increase support for LGU corporate farming 3.2.1.1.

Conduct training

3.2.2. Strengthen SUC participation in extension service delivery; 3.2.2.1.

Establish agreements/memorandum of understanding

3.2.3. Build alliance with other ESPs 3.2.3.1.

Accreditation of ESPs

3.2.4. Intensify accreditation of ESPs 3.2.4.1. Retooling 3.2.5. Expand partnership with professional extension organizations 3.2.5.1.

Conduct symposium/convention/congress

3.2.6. Develop farm family and farm tourism; 3.2.7. Develop agriculture ventures in support to Drug Rehabilitation Program 3.2.7.1.

Conduct training/ symposium

3.2.7.2. Establishment of technology demonstration site

3.3.

Intensify provision of catalytic finance for collaborative undertakings 3.3.1. Operationalize grant system for approved AFE programs and projects 3.3.2. Provide extension grants for approved AFE PPAs of LGUs, NGAs, SUCs, accredited ESPs and other extension stakeholders 3.3.2.1. Conduct briefing/ orientation 3.3.3. Utilize catalytic funding to harmonize and strengthen extension programs 3.3.4. Assist LGU extension programs including extension facilities development

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3.4.

Enhance inter-country cooperation 3.4.1. Establish alliance with international extension professional organizations 3.4.1.1.

Conduct meetings/collaborations

3.4.2. Establish inter-country volunteer extension service cooperation 3.4.2.1.

Conduct meetings/collaborations

3.4.3. Increase linkages with international organizations for country sharing of good agricultural extension practices 3.4.4. Access foreign funding to maximize extension innovations 3.4.4.1. Develop and submit proposals for funding 3.4.5. Promote inter-country collaboration in line with the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) economic integration 3.4.6. Develop and strengthen international networks and partnerships 3.4.6.1. Conduct meetings/conferences

3.5.

Provide support to start-up projects 3.5.1. Provide partner clients with start-up capital related to extension projects 3.5.1.1.

Conduct trainings/meetings

3.5.2. Capacitate clients availing credit/loan 3.5.2.1.

Conduct trainings

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STRATEGIC GOAL 4: Scaled-Up AFE Innovations “Sa Masigasig na Inobasyon, Tao’t Bansa’y Susulong”

Philippine agriculture is both complex and dynamic, and people who are into it are constantly required to respond to new challenges in the form of social, economic and most especially environmental change. Thus, innovations in AFE are really needed to help our small farmers in the field.

Innovation is the creation of better or more effective products, processes, services, technologies, or ideas that are readily available to markets, governments, and most especially to the society. It is important to note that innovation is not synonymous with invention. A&F innovation is not just the invention of a new idea, but it is actually “bringing it to market,” putting into practice and using it in a manner that leads to new products, services or systems that add value or improve quality.

The challenge ahead of us is how to build the capacity for innovation to ensure profitable and sustainable agriculture. Furthermore, capacity for agricultural innovation is vital to improve the livelihood and well-being of the people and goes beyond technological development. There is a need to broaden the range of AFE services coherent with the impacts of globalization, migration, technological and knowledge revolutions, and climate change issues. It is a challenge for our institution to provide more and alternative opportunities to the people and to make a progressive society for the future generation.

Thematic Result 4: Improved implementation of AFE services.

Objectives: 4.1.

Improve diversification of new knowledge and technology that can be transferred and adapted to different situations 4.1.1.

Adopt situation-specific technologies and popularize novel approaches in the dissemination of technologies and in any other extension PPAs

4.1.2. Implement capacity building and modelling of Agri-preneurship , Agri-cator and Agri-tecture 4.1.3. Expansion of entrepreneurial projects, value-chain and agri-based enterprises

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4.2.

Develop new extension modalities, methodologies and approaches that are fit to the changing extension contexts 4.2.1. Build-up new extension approaches adapted to new emerging contexts and roles of extension 4.2.2. Promote farm family agripreneurship 4.2.3. Promote appropriate traditional farming system and indigenous technologies of IPs to ensure the protection of their intellectual property rights in policy and legal frameworks, and development strategies 4.2.4. Conduct/sponsor competitions on innovative extension modalities among ESPs 4.2.5. Establish agricultural and fishery universities managed through ATI

4.3.

Enhance existing extension models 4.3.1. Innovate continuously to improve successful and high impact past and current extension initiatives such as: 4.3.1.1. e-Extension 4.3.1.2.

Farm Business School (FBS)

4.3.1.3.

Learning sites

4.3.1.4. School for Practical Agriculture; 4.3.1.5.

Big-brother small-brother extension model on farm and herbal tourism

4.3.1.6. Adopt a school 4.3.1.7.

Adopt a barangay project

4.3.1.8. Adopt a farm 4.3.1.9. Farmer Scientist Training Program (FSTP) 4.3.1.10. Extension activities for the marginalized sectors 4.3.1.11. Techno-Gabay Program (TGP) 4.3.1.12. Food in every home 4.3.1.13. Palayamanan 4.3.1.14. Agri vans or mobile extension 4.3.1.15. Cafeteria-style extension 4.3.1.16. Rural multi-component smallhold farm 4.3.1.17. Inter-agency Community Development Project

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4.3.1.18. GREEN Goat Project 4.3.1.19. Center-based farm tourism initiatives 4.3.1.20. 4-H Farm Camp 4.3.2. Intensify successful extension models such as the From Arms to Farms and AgriDoc 4.3.3. Open-up organic restaurants to serve as links of organic agriculture farmers to the market 4.4.

Develop a new cadre of extension innovators 4.4.1. Facilitate information exchange on extension innovation 4.4.2. Train extension personnel on innovation management 4.4.3. Create and operate agro-fishery technology innovation councils at the regional and national levels with mandate of prioritizing technology innovation, granting of incentives, and providing awards and recognition to inventors, authors and best implementers in agro-fishery 4.4.4. Implement awards system to high farmer adapters

4.5.

Undertake research to enhance current extension modalities, approaches, and strategies 4.5.1. Conduct of scientific research on extension PPAs contributing to the enhancement of the extension practice 4.5.2. Establish enabling mechanisms to effectively encourage more research initiatives on extension modalities, methodologies, approaches and strategies 4.5.3. Popularize significant AFE research findings through: 4.5.3.1.

Extension fora/conferences/seminars

4.5.3.2. Compendium of research results 4.5.3.3. Colloquium of technology breakthroughs 4.6.

Develop Innovative extension programs & projects 4.6.1. Innovative curriculum

4.7.

Develop/ Build-up innovative training-based methodologies 4.7.1. Hands-on and exposure-based module delivery 4.7.2. Training-based reward system 4.7.3. Design Thinking Strategies 4.7.4. Learning Journey activities

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STRATEGIC GOAL 5: Strengthened Agriculture and Fisheries Extension Stakeholders’ Capacity in Climate Change Resilience “Kahandaan sa Pagbabago ng Klima at Kalamidad: Mababang Pagkawala at Pinsala”

For the past years, the Philippines is being tagged as one of the countries that is “extremely” vulnerable to climate change. This notion stimulated national actions towards adaptation and mitigation initiatives especially on the agricultural sector. It is widely known that the sector’s dominance in the country’s overall productivity growth is one of the major keys of structural transformation to promote long-term economic growth.

Nelson, et al. (2009) stressed that the impacts of climate change on agriculture and human well-being include: 1) the biological effects on crop yields; 2) the resulting impacts on outcomes including prices, production, and consumption; and 3) the impacts on per capita calorie consumption and malnutrition. He further state that the biophysical effects of climate change on agriculture induces changes in production and prices. This goes through the economic system as farmers and other market participants adjust autonomously, altering crop mix, input use, production, food demand, food consumption and trade.

As this phenomenon is nearly inevitable, extension has a crucial role in promoting and disseminating adaptation and mitigation measures at the micro level. It is important to train and educate small-holder farmers about these measures. This aims to lessen the effects of climate change and to sustain their production to maintain or increase the sector’s output. Consistent with our mandate, our Institute assures smooth and continuous coordination with A&F stakeholders in this undertaking. This is complementary to existing environmental and social conservation initiatives.

Thematic Result 5: • Climate change resilient communities • Sustainable development Objectives: 5.1.

Enhance provision of extension services on climate change adaptation and mitigation 5.1.1.

Capacitate stakeholders on climate adaptation and mitigation technologies, practices and approaches

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5.1.1.1.

Conduct trainings and other extension activities on climate adaptation and mitigation technologies, practices and approaches on the following: • Climate-ready cropping system • Weather scenarios and climate variability • Small-scale irrigation systems/technologies • Early warning and alarm systems • Rain water harvesting and storage • Credit and grant programs for climate change • Climate Smart Farm Business Schools (CSFBS) • Utilization of maps

5.1.1.2.

Conduct SOA, theater arts, folk media and others on climate change adaptation and mitigation

5.1.1.3.

Establish community-based biogas system

5.1.2. Intensify climate resilient learning sites establishment in agricultural communities 5.1.2.1.

Conduct evaluation of prospective farms

5.1.2.2.

Comply with the documents required in the establishment of learning sites and model farms

5.1.2.3.

Establish climate resilient model farms and learning sites

5.1.3. Document climate change adaptation and mitigation best practices 5.1.3.1.

Gather information and records on climate change adaptation and mitigation best practices

5.1.3.2.

Develop compendium of farmer’s best practices and local knowledge/bio-indicators of climate change

5.1.3.3.

Disseminate best practices and local knowledge/bio-indicators of climate change

5.1.4. Access to climate change information system and database to assess vulnerability and resilience of A&F communities and natural resources (e.g. GIS and maps) 5.1.4.1.

Establish linkage with appropriate agencies such as National Mapping and Resource Information Agency (NAMRIA), Bureau of Soils and Water Management (BSWM), Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP), Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), Department of Environment

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and Natural Resources, (DENR), Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), etc. and obtain the needed information and database 5.1.4.2.

Disseminate information to stakeholders

5.1.5. Intensify information dissemination on climate change resilient agriculture and fisheries technologies

5.2.

5.1.5.1.

Develop, produce and disseminate relevant IEC materials on climate change adaptation and mitigation practices for AFE clients

5.1.5.2.

Use mass media, e-extension, and other e-portals for information sharing and exchange

Strengthen extension support on sustainable production, consumption and food safety 5.2.1. Capacitate stakeholders on sustainable production, consumption and food safety 5.2.1.1.

Conduct trainings and other extension activities on sustainable production, consumption and food safety on the following: • Nature farming • Vermiculture • Urban agriculture • Organic agriculture • Waste management • Food safety and consumption patterns (GAP, GMP, HACCP, HALAL, and others) • Consumer awareness

5.2.2. Document best practices on sustainable production, consumption and food safety; 5.2.2.1.

Gather information and records on sustainable production, consumption and food safety best practices

5.2.2.2. Develop compendium of farmer’s best practices and local knowledge on sustainable production, consumption and food safety 5.2.3. Intensify development and dissemination of IEC materials on sustainable production, consumption and food safety 5.2.3.1.

Develop, produce and disseminate relevant IEC materials on sustainable production, consumption and food safety for AFE clients

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5.2.3.2. Use mass media, e-extension, and other e-portals for information sharing and exchange

5.3.

Intensify knowledge and skills on environmental protection and biodiversity conservation 5.3.1. Capacitate stakeholders on environmental protection and biodiversity conservation 5.3.1.1.

Conduct trainings and other extension activities on environmental protection and biodiversity conservation on the following: • Soils and Water Management • Coastal Management • Ecological Management • Watershed Management • Solid Waste Management • Agro-forestry technologies and practices • Biodiversity Conservation

5.3.1.2.

Participate in various environmental protection and biodiversity conservation activities (Tree for Life-Food for Life, Coastal Cleanup, Earth Hour etc.)

5.3.1.3.

Showcase technologies and practices on environmental protection within ATI premises

5.3.1.4.

Support to Green Economy Initiatives

5.3.2. Document best practices on environmental protection and biodiversity conservation 5.3.2.1.

Gather information and records on environmental protection and biodiversity conservation best practices

5.3.2.2. Develop compendium of farmer’s best practices and local knowledge on environmental protection and biodiversity conservation 5.3.3. Intensify development and dissemination of IEC materials on environmental protection and biodiversity conservation intensified 5.3.3.1.

Develop, produce and disseminate relevant IEC materials on environmental protection and biodiversity conservation for AFE clients

5.3.3.2. Use mass media, e-extension, and other e-portals for information sharing and exchange

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5.4.

Increase capacity of stakeholders on Disaster Risk Reduction Management (DRRM) 5.4.1. Capacitate stakeholders on DRRM 5.4.1.1.

Conduct trainings and other extension activities on DRRM on the following: 5.4.1.1.1.

Community-Managed Disaster Risk Reduction and Management • Participatory Rural Rapid Appraisal • Hazard, Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment • Disaster Risk Analysis • Evacuation and Control Protocols • Early warning system • Participatory Planning

5.4.1.2.

5.4.1.1.2.

Insurance programs

5.4.1.1.3.

Livestock Emergency Guidelines and Standards (LEGS)

Establish “Extension Disaster Education Network” (EDEN)

5.4.2. Reproduce and distribute IEC Materials on DRRM 5.4.2.1.

Develop, produce and disseminate relevant IEC materials on DRRM for AFE clients

5.4.2.2. Use of mass media, e-extension, and other e-portals for information sharing and exchange 5.4.3. Document best practices on DRR in agriculture and fishery 5.4.3.1.

Gather information and records on DRRM best practices

5.4.3.2. Develop compendium of farmer’s best practices and local knowledge on DRRM

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STRATEGIC GOAL 6: Improved Enabling Environment and Quality of Governance “Mahusay na Pamamalakad: Sagot sa Maunlad at Matuwid na Pamumuhay”

Good governance translates from consistent management of resources and relations, and cohesive policies, processes and decision-rights. It is fundamentally a human activity related to how important decisions are made concerning the future of the institution, the people and the environment that relies on them. Good governance enables sustainable wealth creation whereas a dissipated governance erodes everything that enables decent living for the common good. The government plays a vital part as the central institution to exercise power over its subjects. Hence, it is essential for the government to improve the quality of governance especially in the field of AFE.

The strength of AFE relies on its appropriate policies, strategies and efficient M&E system to meet the growing demand of various A&F stakeholders. The sixth goal guarantees harmonization of extension policies, strategic plans, and M&E mechanisms to effectively implement all extension services to attain maximum utility and fortify institutional collaboration and linkages.

Thematic Result 6: Efficiency and effectiveness in the delivery of AFE services.

Objectives: 6.1.

Develop and implement policy, planning, M&E mechanisms for AFE to ensure efficiency, effectiveness and transparency 6.1.1.

Implement effective AFE policies 6.1.1.1.

Develop need based extension policies and evaluate existing guidelines for updating and upgrading

6.1.1.2.

Advocate and implement extension related policies and standards

6.1.1.3.

Develop operational standards and protocols for AFE services

6.1.1.4.

Install/improve planning, M&E procedures and mechanisms

6.1.1.5.

Conduct evaluation studies of extension programs and projects

6.1.1.6.

Disseminate evaluation results for extension messages and utilize results for decision-making

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6.2.

Optimize resource management 6.2.1. Maintain and sustain a Quality Management System (QMS) 6.2.1.1.

Continuous improvement of the QMS

6.2.1.2.

Expansion of Centers to be ISO-certified

6.2.1.3.

Maintenance of ISO 9001 certification

6.2.2. Efficiently manage financial resources 6.2.2.1.

Develop long term financial plans to meet future demands

6.2.2.2. Programming of PPAs towards function-based budgeting 6.2.2.3. Generate additional resources from internal/external sources 6.2.2.4. Maximize utilization of financial resources 6.2.2.5. Minimize audit observations on financial transactions 6.2.2.6. Analyze financial performance to identify ways for efficient use of resources 6.2.3. Provide and maximize the use of state-of-the-art facilities and equipment 6.2.3.1.

Upgrade/maintain facilities and equipment

6.2.3.2. Procure/maintain vehicles and state-of-the-art equipment 6.2.3.3. Dispose unserviceable vehicle and equipment 6.2.4. Capacitate human resources 6.2.4.1. Establish and operationalize a merit and award system for the ATI workforce 6.2.4.2. Update and implement a Human Resource Development Plan 6.2.4.3. Scout for scholarship opportunities (local & foreign) 6.2.4.4. Delineate functions properly, fairly and clearly

6.3

Identify success level of corporate brand awareness campaign 6.3.1. Enhance authority/credibility/marketability; 6.3.1.1.

Build customer awareness

6.3.1.2.

Massive info/advocacy campaigns about ATI

6.3.1.3. Link with media station/entities for media exposure 6.3.1.4. Develop annual communication plan for corporate communication 6.3.1.5. Launch flagship extension program/s and extension month celebration

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6.3.1.6. Strengthen corporate communication activities 6.3.1.7.

Operationalize the Learning and Discovery (LeaD)Center for A&F

6.3.1.8. Intensify local and international linkage and web presence 6.3.1.9. Support professional organizations e.g. Philippine Extension and Advisory Services Network (PhilEASNet), Philippine Association of Agriculturists (PAA), etc.

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PROPOSED

BUDGET ALLOCATION

In economics, resource allocation is often associated with economic efficiency and maximization of utility. It is the primary driver of success in which the inefficiency of required inputs will defer the attainment of desired outputs. Over the years, the Institute has obtained incremental increases in its yearly budget, making channels for extension services to reach small-holder farmers and fishers. The proposed budget allocation for fiscal year 2017-2022 was projected based on available data obtained for the past years.

Table 1. Projected Budget Allocation for FY 2017-2022, Per Fund Source FUND SOURCE

2016

2017

a

PROPOSED BUDGET (‘000) 2018 2019 2020 2021

Personnel Services (PS) Maintenance 672,526 1,845,966 1,380,819 and Other Operating Expenses (MOOE) Capital Out- 93,452 403,000 238,466 lay (CO) 888,380 2,508,456 1,882,908 TOTAL 122,402

a

259,490

263,623

- Based on the National Expenditure Program (NEP)

285,293

303,905

328,887

1,972,427

2,627,185

3,312,466

3,898,306

288,570

339,427

419,098

488,375

2,533,083

3,251,905

4,035,469

4,715,568

Note: Baseline data for forecasting include financial data from 2010-2017

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2022

272,086

MONITORING

AND EVALUATION

In a period of globalization where competition is becoming steeper, ATI’s extension PPAs must show relevance and effectiveness to justify investments on government spending. For the ATI to determine whether its PPAs are relevant and effective, an efficient M&E scheme should be installed. M&E can help the Institute to extract from past and ongoing activities, relevant information that can subsequently be used as the basis for policy formulation, program fine-tuning, reorientation, and planning. Further, M&E will promote accountability and transparency in the spending of government funds.

M&E of ATI PPAs will be anchored with the NESAF RBMES that will focus on assessing whether the targeted interventions identified were accomplished and the desired results were achieved (Annex 1).

Figure 5. Process Flow Diagram of ATI Monitoring System

Results from monitoring reports and evaluation studies are being presented during the midyear and annual in-house performance review and assessment. This is to find out whether its public spending achieved the set outputs and outcomes that ultimately improve the quality of life particularly of the poor and vulnerable through enhanced quality of extension services.

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ACKNOWLEDGMENT We wish to extend our gratitude to the persons who have been part of the consultation process in the development and finalization of this document. Recognition is also expressed to the management for their continuing support and encouragement throughout the progress of this plan. ATI RTCs Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR)

Arlene L. Flores, PhD Vilma L. Lumbas Felipe B. Manaoat III

Ilocos Region

Rogelio C. Evangelista, PhD Abegel A. Joson Alyssa Mae D. Morta

Cagayan Valley

Reynato George A. Maguigad Inocencia S. Velasco Ellaine D. Jintalan

Central Luzon

Veronica CV. Esguerra Marciano C. Santos Pia B. Zantua

CALABARZON

Sherylou C. Alfaro Franklin Bel T. Isip Daynon Kristoff S. Imperial

MIMAROPA

Pat Andrew B. Barrientos Mel D. Manalo Ma. Camille D. Casubuan

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Bicol Region

Vivien V. Carable Engr. Joey A. Belarmino Joy O. Rodriguez Emmanuel L. Orogo

Western Visayas

Eden DLR. Bautista, PhD Alma C. Gorero Lyn G. Bantigue

Central Visayas

Carolyn May O. Daquio, PhD Lydia B. Borbano Lourdino B. Sale

Eastern Visayas

Vilma M. Patindol, PhD Venus June J. Taghoy

Zamboanga Peninsula

Annabelle M. Garciano Decelyn A. Sarsaba Celestino A. Camocamo Naima W. Abbas

Northern Mindanao

Angelito D. Quirog, PhD Mael Japhet G. Alvarez

Davao Region

Emelia M. Gadingan Rowina T. Esconde Jerry Carpentero

SOCSKSARGEN

Abdul I. Daya-an Teofilo T. Jumawan, Jr. Shirley L. Belida

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CARAGA

Robert T. Poculan, Jr. Nena L. Lomuntad Aurea Janine P. Abucay

ITCPH

Editha E. Cabilitazan, DVM Jackielyn G. Binay

ATI CENTRAL OFFICE AFU-OD

Leonila D. Caiz Gaudioso P. Cabigue Madonna Mae V. Madriaga

ISO Office - OD

Dante G. Esguerra Arlene S. Nilo

PAD

Engr. Renato B. Dela Cruz Rosemarie E. Dulla Elsa A. Parot Manuel M. Dimalaluan

PPD

Milagros C. Urbano Vicente S. Dayanghirang Jr.

CDMD

Editha S. Vinuya Thelma B. Austria Theresa Aurora B. Cosico

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TECHNICAL EXPERT/RESOURCE PERSON Evelyn Aro-Esquejo, PhD

PPD - TASK FORCE TEAM Rose Ann P. Leonor Gay Ritchel GQ. Dianala Renz P. Sanchez Cindy Corcelles Renelle Joy Tabinas Arnel Bunda Jerwin Resuelo EDITOR Antonieta J. Arceo

LAYOUT & DESIGN Karl Louise M. Salibio

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REFERENCES Agricultural Training Institute. 2013. Corporate Plan 2012-2016: The Business Plan of the Agricultural Training Institute- The Apex Agency for Agriculture & Fisheries Extension. Diliman, Quezon City. Agricultural Training Institute. 2016. Philippine Agriculture and Fisheries Extension Strategic Plan 2017-2022: Empowering Communities Towards Globally-Competitive and Climateresilient Agriculture and Fisheries Sector Through Harmonized and Unified Extension Service Delivery. Diliman, Quezon City. Agricultural Training Institute. 2016. The National Extension Agenda and Programs 20172022: Empowering Communities Towards Globally-Competitive and Climate-resilient Agriculture and Fisheries Sector Through Harmonized and Unified Extension Service Delivery. Diliman, Quezon City. Bowman, A. & Kearney, R. 1990. State and Local Government: The Essentials, definition of terms. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, Boston, New York. Dietrich, M. & Krafft, J. 2012. Handbook on the Economics and Theory of the Firm, page 427. Cheltenham, United Kingdom. McGregor, L. 2011. The Thinker: The Essence of Corporate Governance, page 18-19. United Kingdom. National Economic and Development Authority. 2014. Philippine Development Plan 2011-2016 Revalidated Results Matrices. Ortigas Center, Pasig City. Nelson, G., et al. 2009. Food Policy Report: Climate Change Impact on Agriculture and Costs of Adaptation. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, D.C. Office of the President of the Philippines. Database on official and legal releases of Republic Acts and Executive Orders. Manila: Malacañang Records Office via the Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. Rappler. 2015. PH drops in 2016 list of countries vulnerable to climate change. Retrieved 21 September 2016 from Serrano, S. 1987. Extension Delivery System: The Philippine Bureau of Agricultural Extension, page 11-15. Crop Science Society of the Philippines–Philippine Journal of Crop Science The World Bank. 2016. World DataBank on World Development Indicators. Retrieved 21 September 2016 from

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ANNEX

Annex 1. ATI Results-Based Monitoring and Evaluation System The Theory of Change (ToC) model assumes that all interventions provided by AFE stakeholders would lead to these results with each result serving as a precondition on what has to change so that other results are to be achieved. The connectedness of results from the immediate to the long-term statement of the AFE ToC model revolves around the desired scenario for the AFE client system. The inclusion of societal goals to the ToC model suggest that the results identified are contributory to the attainment of food security, poverty reduction and increased social equity.

The first result expected to arise is the increased access to interventions. This result assumes that with all the available interventions across the six (6) thematic areas, clients, especially those in the grassroots, have greater access to interventions. Once clients are reached by interventions, the opportunity for them to improve their capacities increases thus resulting to an improved ASK. The improved provision of interventions refers to the changes that happen from those who provide extension interventions based on the effect of the improved capacities of clients. The clients can also be classified as those who provide AFE interventions. The assumption is that clients providing AFE interventions are capacitated to improve the delivery of their programs and services contributing to the attainment of higher results.

For the intermediate statements, increased productivity of clients refers to the application of the knowledge and skills gained leading to more work being done as resources are maximized, and used efficiently and effectively. Then after, slowly clients due to their increased productivity become empowered. They begin to engage in bigger roles in the community. Next level result would be the increased resiliency of clients where it is assumed that after being empowered, the sustainability of the clients’ engagement comes into account. This means that the clients are confident and able to adapt to any disaster events that may occur.

The long-term result is the ultimate goal of the AFE system. This is the increased competitiveness of clients. This means that clients have become an excellent player in the agricultural market as they are able to produce and deliver quality products.

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41

Time

Methods

Machineries

Money

Manpower

INPUT

Provide enabling environment

Provide climate change initiatives

Develop AFE innovations

Establish partnerships

Provide capability building activities

Provide knowledge products and services

ACTIVITIES

Improved provision of interventions

Improved knowledge, skills, and attitude of clients

Increased access to interventions

IMMEDIATE

Increased resiliency of clients

Increased empowerment of clients

Increased productivity of clients

INTERMEDIATE

Figure 6. The AFE Theory of Change Model

Enabling environment provided

Climate change initiatives provided

AFE innovations developed

Partnerships established

Capability building activities provided

Knowledge products and services provided

OUTPUT

Increased competitiveness of clients

LONG-TERM

Increased social equity

Poverty reduction

Food security

SOCIETAL GOALS