Shifting Cultivation to Sustainable Livelihood Creation

From Shifting Cultivation to Sustainable Livelihood Creation: ... requested the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) as APFED Secretar...

0 downloads 52 Views 2MB Size
 

      From Shifting Cultivation to Sustainable Livelihood Creation:  Strengthening Marginalised Communities through  Institutional Development and Microfinance for Agroforestry  and Energy‐efficient Technologies     – Assessment of an UNDP GEF Small Grant Project   in Makawanpur District, Nepal – 

                                         

August 2009  Forest Conservation, Livelihoods and Rights Project  Institute for Global Environmental Strategies     

   

   

        From Shifting Cultivation to Sustainable Livelihood Creation:  Strengthening Marginalised Communities through  Institutional Development and Microfinance for Agroforestry  and Energy‐efficient Technologies     – Assessment of an UNDP GEF Small Grant Project   in Makawanpur District, Nepal – 

                       

              Federico López‐Casero and Ukesh Raj Bhuju  August 2009  i 

 

  Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES)  Forest Conservation, Livelihoods, and Rights Project  2108‐11 Kamiyamaguchi, Hayama, Kanagawa 240‐0115 Japan  Phone: +81‐46‐855‐3830 • Facsimile: +81‐46‐855‐3809  E‐mail: fc‐[email protected]  Copyright © 2009 by Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), Japan, and South Asian Institute  of Technology (SAIT), Nepal    All  rights  reserved.  Inquiries  regarding  this  publication  copyright  should  be  addressed  to  IGES  in  writing.    No  parts  of  this  publication  may  be  reproduced  or  transmitted  in  any  form  or  by  any  means,  electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval  system, without the prior permission in writing from IGES.    Although every effort is made to ensure objectivity and balance, the printing of a paper or translation  does  not  imply  IGES  endorsement  or  acquiescence  with  its  conclusions  or  the  endorsement  of  IGES  financers. IGES maintains a position of neutrality at all times on issues concerning public policy. Hence  conclusions  that  are  reached  in  IGES  publications  should  be  understood  to  be  those  of  authors  and  not attributed to staff‐members, officers, directors, trustees, funders, or to IGES itself.    Cover photo: Chepang farmer with her children, Polaghari (Manahari VDC). Photo credit – López‐ Casero 

                                       

         

ii   

Foreword    The  Ryutaro  Hashimoto  Asia  Pacific  Forum  for  Environment  and  Development  (APFED)  Awards  for  Good Practices were launched in 2006 to acknowledge the commendable practices of organisations  in  promoting  sustainable  development  in  the  Asia‐Pacific  region,  and  to  disseminate  information  thereon to a wide range of stakeholders with a view to sharing and replicating those good practices.  Six  projects  were  chosen  in  2008.  Building  upon  these  award  winning  cases,  the  APFED  members  requested the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) as APFED Secretariat to facilitate  the conduct of case studies to provide a more in‐depth study into the progress of the award winning  cases  and  how  other  projects  may  learn  from  them.  IGES,  wherever  possible,  is  to  facilitate  this  undertaking in collaboration with the member organisations of the Asia‐Pacific Regional Network of  Research  Institutions  for  Environmental  Management  and  Sustainable  Development  (NetRes)  or  alternatively  with  the  local  academics  who  have  expertise  in  the  subject  matter  of  the  aforementioned case study.    The APFED Gold Award 2008 was bestowed upon the Manahari Development Institute‐Nepal (MDI‐ Nepal) in recognition of its outstanding contribution in promoting environmental management and  sustainable development under the project entitled “Mitigation of the Effects of the Carbon dioxide  and other Greenhouse Gases by Controlling Slash and Burn Practices.” The project was conducted in  the northwest of Makawanpur District in Nepal and funded by United Nations Development Program  (UNDP) / Global Environment Facility/Small Grants Program (GEF/SGP). Mr Khop Narayan Shrestha,  Coordinator  of  the  MDI‐Nepal,  received  the  APFED  gold  award  in  the  award  giving  ceremony  organised  at  the  4th  Plenary  Meeting  in  Davao,  the  Philippines  on  25  July  2008.    This  Gold  Award  carries a purse of USD 20,000.      This report presents a case study of the awarded project and is based on a survey conducted from 17  to  21  March  2009  in  the  project  area  with  full  support  provided  by  the  project  implementer.  The  survey was led by Federico López‐Casero Michaelis (IGES) and the research team included Ukesh Raj  Bhuju as a local collaborator. We are grateful to Henry Scheyvens and Enrique Ibarra Gené for their  comments and thoughts on a draft of this report.      Special thanks are due to the South Asian Institute of Technology (SAIT), particularly to its Executive  Director, Mr Pramod Pradhan, for facilitating the field survey. The research team also appreciates the  full  organisational  assistance  provided  by  the  project  implementer,  MDI‐Nepal,  and  its  staff  during  the  survey.  The  research  team  owes  its  gratitude  to  the  communities  of  Manahari,  Handikhola,  Kankada,  and  Raksirang  Village  Development  Committees  of  Makawanpur  District,  Nepal,  for  their  wonderful hospitality during the survey.     We are also grateful to Emma Fushimi for proofreading the report. The authors alone are responsible  for any errors in fact.    Federico López‐Casero  Policy researcher, Forest Conservation, Livelihoods and Rights Project, IGES  iii   

Table of contents    Foreword ................................................................................................................................................ iii Table of contents .................................................................................................................................... iv Figures and Tables ................................................................................................................................... v Acronyms ................................................................................................................................................ vi 1. Assessment design .......................................................................................................................... 1 1.1. Research objectives and components ..................................................................................... 1 1.2. Assessment Framework ........................................................................................................... 1 1.3. Methodology ............................................................................................................................ 2 2. Key project features ....................................................................................................................... 4 2.1. Implementing organisation: MDI‐Nepal .................................................................................. 4 2.2. Geographic and socio‐economic conditions and challenges of the project area .................... 5 2.2.1. Project area and participants ........................................................................................... 5 2.2.2. Environmental challenges: Shifting cultivation in the project area ................................. 5 2.2.3. Socio‐economic challenges: Marginalised communities and food security ..................... 6 2.3. Project overview ...................................................................................................................... 8 2.3.1. Objectives ......................................................................................................................... 9 2.3.2. Key target indicators and project activities ...................................................................... 9 3. Field observations and project activity assessment ..................................................................... 11 3.1. Institutional development ...................................................................................................... 11 3.1.1. Project input and process ............................................................................................... 11 3.1.2. Project output and impact.............................................................................................. 13 3.2. Agroforestry in slash and burn area ....................................................................................... 17 3.2.1. Project process and input ............................................................................................... 17 3.2.2. Project output and impact.............................................................................................. 19 3.3. Livelihood promotion ............................................................................................................. 26 3.3.1. Project input and process ............................................................................................... 26 3.3.2. Project output and impact.............................................................................................. 28 3.4. Energy Saving Technologies ................................................................................................... 31 3.4.1. Project input and process ............................................................................................... 31 3.4.2. Project output and impact.............................................................................................. 33 3.5. Capacity building activities ..................................................................................................... 35 3.5.1. Project input: Training and exposures ............................................................................ 35 3.5.2. Project impact ................................................................................................................ 36 4. Conclusions ................................................................................................................................... 37 4.1. Achievement of project objectives ........................................................................................ 37 4.1.1. Development of appropriate land use practices for sustainable production ................ 38 4.1.2. Development of community based organisations ......................................................... 38 4.1.3. Incentive scheme for the adoption of energy saving technologies ............................... 39 4.1.4. Development of skilled human resources ...................................................................... 40 4.1.5. Livelihood improvement ................................................................................................ 40 4.2. Cross cutting issues ................................................................................................................ 41 iv   

4.2.1. Gender and caste/ethnicity ............................................................................................ 41 4.2.2. Appropriateness and sustainability ................................................................................ 43 4.2.3. Replicability and ongoing replication ............................................................................. 44 5. Recommendations ........................................................................................................................ 46 References ............................................................................................................................................. 48 Appendix: Schedule of the field survey ................................................................................................. 49    

 

Figures and Tables    Figure 1: Environmental problem tree  ................................................................................................... 6  Figure 2: Socio‐economic problem tree  ................................................................................................. 7  Figure 3: Planted species by percentage  .............................................................................................. 17  Figure 4: Market linkage: The existing market networks for banana  .................................................. 22    Table 1: Ethnicity composition in Project Area  ...................................................................................... 7  Table 2: Budget contribution by co‐funding partners to MDI‐Nepal projects in the area  ..................... 8  Table 3: Project components and activities  ......................................................................................... 10  Table 4: Revolving fund mechanism  ..................................................................................................... 12  Table 5: Registered cooperatives at project completion  ..................................................................... 16  Table 6: Planted records of agroforestry crop species .......................................................................... 18  Table 7: Production and income from the agroforestry crops  ............................................................. 20  Table 8: Water harvesting tanks and surface irrigation project  ........................................................... 27  Table 9: Income received through goat farming  .................................................................................. 28  Table 10: Production and sales of fresh vegetables  ............................................................................. 29  Table 11: Production and sales of cash crops  ...................................................................................... 29  Table 12: Details of solar home system ................................................................................................ 31  Table 13: Details of improved cooking stoves  ...................................................................................... 32  Table 14: Details of biogas plants  ......................................................................................................... 32  Table 15: Improved water mills ............................................................................................................. 33  Table 16: Capacity building ..................................................................................................................  35  Table 17: Summary of achievements  ................................................................................................... 37  Table 18: Gender and ethnicity involved in the project  ....................................................................... 42   

v   

Acronyms     AMC  APFED   CETF  DANIDA  FAO  GEF/SGP  GTZ  ICS  IGES  MDI‐Nepal  NPR  NTPF  PAF  SAIT  SALT  SCG  UNDP  USD   VDC  WFP   

Agroforestry management committee  Asia Pacific Forum for Environment and Development   Community Environment Trust Fund  Danish International Development Agency  Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations  UNDP Global Environment Facility/Small Grants Program  Deutsche  Gesellschaft  für  Technische  Zusammenarbeit  (German  Technical  Cooperation)  Improved cooking stoves  Institute for Global Environmental Strategies  Manahari Development Institute‐Nepal (Project implementer)  Nepalese  Rupee  (Average  exchange  rate  for  the  period  1  August  2005  –  30  November 2006: 1 USD = 74.9 NPR)  Non‐timber forest product  Poverty Alleviation Fund  South Asian Institute of Technology  Sloping Agricultural Land Technology  Saving and credit group  United Nations Development Program  United States Dollars  Village Development Committee (smallest local administrative unit in Nepal)  World Food Programme 

vi   

1. Assessment design   

1.1.

Research objectives and components 

The main objective of the APFED Award case studies is to conduct an in‐depth analysis of the good  practice  in  the  award  winning  cases  through:  a)  examining  the  key  features/components  of  the  project;  b)  identifying  and  analysing  how  the  good  practice  was  realised  or  facilitated,  (clearly  identifying  conditions/interventions  both  intentional  and  circumstantial);  and,  c)  drawing  lessons  from the experience by being able to recommend replicable components or instruments which were  key to realising the good practice.     The case study of “Mitigation of the Effects of the Carbon dioxide and other Greenhouse Gases by  Controlling Slash and Burn Practices” (hereafter: “GEF/SGP project”) is structured as follows:  y Assessment design   y Key project features  y Field observations and project activity assessment  y Conclusions   y Recommendations.   

1.2.

Assessment Framework  

Based  on  information  initially  provided  by  the  implementer,  a  critical  assessment  framework  was  developed  for  assessing  the  project  against  its  overall  and  its  specific  objectives,  considering  the  outputs  under  each  of  the  project  activities.  The  framework  included  the  following  broad  approaches:  y Input  monitoring:  Were  project  resources  (money,  technical  support,  equipment,  credit,  etc.)  utilised on time and for the required purposes?  y Process monitoring: Was the project implemented in an efficient and participatory way, and is  the project accessible to all sectors of the target population – including women?   y Output  monitoring:  Did  the  project  produce  the  required  outputs  (improved  agroforestry,  energy saving technologies, institutional development, provision of credit,  etc.)?  y Impact evaluation: Is the project producing the intended impacts on the target population and  environment  (increased  income,  improved  health,  increased  women’s  participation  in  community management, increased biodiversity etc.)?  y Sustainability assessment: Are the facilities and services introduced by the project sustainable  financially,  institutionally  and  environmentally  (agroforestry  schemes,  land  use  and  energy  saving technologies, credit repayment, maintenance and application of agroforesty methods)?  y Replicability  assessment:  Can  the  project  be  replicated?  Further  questions  include:  Are  there  certain pre‐existing conditions necessary for its success? What components are essential?   

1   

1.3.

Methodology  

The assessment was conducted in the following seven steps:    Step 1: Site Selection   The  GEF/SGP  project  involved  four  Village  Development  Committees  (VDCs)  –  the  smallest  local  administrative units – (Manahari, Handikhola, Raksirang and Kankada) in north‐western Makawanpur  District. A number of households and community organisations in several settlements within three of  the four VDCs were selected through consultation with the project implementer (see Appendix). The  assessment  team  interviewed  project  participants  of  the  Chepang,  Tamang  and  Dalit  communities. Due to its rather remote location, Kankada VDC was only visited for a meeting with the members of  an agriculture cooperative.1      The primary selection criterion was the prospect of obtaining information on all the activities of the  project  in  the  most  representative  way  possible  given  the  short  duration  of  the  stay.  While  some  activities  like  banana  planting  were  conducted  in  all  the  visited  sites,  others  –  such  as  biogas  and  vermicomposting – were limited to a few settlements. Therefore, the selection strategy was twofold:  to  include  the  most  representative  sites  for  the  common  activities  as  well  as  sites  where  the  less  common activities could be observed.    Step 2: Composition of the research team   Because  the  assessment  covers  economic,  social  and  environmental  issues,  the  research  team  included  two  experts  in  the  fields  of  environmental  conservation,  community  development,  participatory  rural  appraisal,  and  gender  analysis.  It  consisted  of  a  researcher  of  the  IGES  Forest  Conservation,  Livelihoods  and  Rights  Project  and  the  local  collaborator,  Conservation  Director  of  Nepal Nature Dot Com, Mr. Ukesh Raj Bhuju.       Step 3: Collection of secondary data   With  the  assistance  of  the  project  implementer,  the  materials  collected  and  analysed  included  the  project  implementer’s  application  form  for  the  APFED  award  and  the  data  sheet,  reports,  development plans and awareness materials (including audio‐visual material).     Step 4: Decision on entry strategies   The  decision  on  entry  strategies  was  primarily  made  by  identifying  the  key  stakeholders.    The  itinerary  and  field  plans  were  prepared  upon  consultation  with  the  implementer,  and  the  main  stakeholders were informed at least two days before the scheduled meetings.    Step 5: Fieldwork   The fieldwork was arranged on the basis of discussions between the team members and SAIT, IGES  and MDI‐Nepal. During fieldwork, three major activities were conducted, namely site observations,                                                               1  However,  near  Manahari  Bazar,  the  team  also  coincidentally  met  and  interviewed  one  representative  from  Shikhardanda in Kankada VDC.   2   

interactions with the communities and implementer through focus group discussions, and interactive  meetings and interviews using checklists. The checklists were primarily based on the progress report  prepared by the project implementer.     Step 6: Information analysis   The team members discussed the findings both on the spot in the presence of the target groups and  the  project  implementer  and  also  separately,  to  analyse  the  findings  and  draw  recommendations.  The methodology for analysis consisted of an assessment against the target indicators and objectives  of  the  project  employing  the  above  framework.  The  conclusions  draw  primarily  from  the  observations  made  and  information  obtained  during  the  4‐day  field  survey  (see  the  Appendix  for  details),  a  review  of  various  project‐related  documents  provided  by  the  implementer,  and  a  consultative  meeting  with  line  agency  and  NGO  representatives  to  obtain  their  feedback  on  the  project findings.    Step 7: Report preparation   The  report  was  drafted  in  two  stages.  The  first  and  second  drafts  were  prepared  by  the  team  members and were shared with the project implementer for feedback, before the draft report was  finalised. 

3   

2. Key project features     This  section  briefly  introduces  the  project  implementing  organisation,  the  project  area  and  its  environmental and social challenges, and the project activities and indicators.    

2.1.

Implementing organisation: MDI‐Nepal  

The  Manahari  Development  Institute  –  Nepal  (MDI‐Nepal)  was  founded  on  19  September  2001  by  professionals  affiliated  with  various  developmental  non‐government  organisations.  It  has  25  staff  members, some of whom are based at the project sites.     Registered in the District Administration Office of Makawanpur (Regd. No. 744/057/58) and affiliated  with  the  Social  Welfare  Council  of  Nepal  (SWC  affiliation  number  13918),  MDI‐Nepal  is  a  non‐ governmental  organisation  that  primarily  has  strengths  in  agriculture  and  related  subjects  such  as  small  irrigation,  rural  roads  and  drinking  water.  During  its  short  history  of  eight  years,  it  has  implemented  a  series  of  projects  on  agricultural  development,  poverty  reduction  and  basic  infrastructure development. MDI‐Nepal has implemented several projects to improve the livelihoods  of  the  rural  poor  primarily  through  interventions  in  agricultural,  environment  and  water  sectors.  MDI‐Nepal’s  main  priority  has  been  to  ensure  food  and  income  security  to  the  vulnerable  and  disadvantaged people of the rural society. During the field survey, the personal motivation and drive  of the staff was observed to be very high.      MDI‐Nepal has acquired substantial experience in improving crop productivity of rainfed farm lands  through  providing  technical  support  for  farming  practice  and  the  development  of  small‐scale  irrigation  systems.  MDI‐Nepal  has  introduced  innovative  water  acquisition  and  application  technologies such as water harvesting tanks, infiltration galleries, drip irrigation and sprinklers. It is a  leading  institution  in  the  management  of  sloping  uplands  (shifting  cultivation  or  slash  and  burn  farming  areas)  through  terracing  and  cultivation  of  high  value  crops  along  with  the  use  of  water  harvesting  technologies.  The  district  government  has  recognised  MDI‐Nepal’s  efforts  in  assisting  nearly 5,000 rural farmers escape from poverty and food insecurity by proper utilisation of land and  water resources. It has also facilitated the process of establishing community‐based institutions.    The main activities of MDI‐Nepal are:     1. Social mobilisation   a. Building community organisations   b. Capacity development of local cadres  2. Rural infrastructure development   a. Small/micro irrigation  b. Drinking water supply  c. Rural roads  d. Marketing centres 

4   

3. Livelihood promotion   a.  Appropriate agricultural technologies  b.   Cash crop (vegetables, non‐timber forest products, fruits) and livestock production, marketing  4. Environmental sustenance   a. Land degradation: Focus on Sloping Agricultural Land Technology (SALT) in marginal lands  b. Climate change mitigation    Apart  from  the  GEF/SGP  project,  MDI‐Nepal  has  conducted  projects  funded  by  the  World  Food  Programme,  the  Poverty  Alleviation  Fund,  GTZ  and  other  donor  institutions.  MDI‐Nepal  has  built  a  rural road under a food‐for‐work programme and established a lift irrigation scheme in Rajaiya and  several fish ponds in the Churia settlements, Handikhola VDC.    

2.2.  Geographic and socio‐economic conditions and challenges of the project  area  2.2.1. Project area and participants  The project was conducted in an area managed by the Manahari, Handikhola, Kankada and Raksirang  VDCs of north‐western Makawanpur district, in the mid‐hills of Nepal. The project site targeted 429  ha of slope land under serious threat of degradation. The project has involved a total of 1,524 tribal  households of Chepang and Tamang communities in different project interventions.     Makawanpur, a typical mid‐hill district of Nepal, has a total land area of 242,600 ha, but less than 7%  is classified as cultivable land. The remaining 93% of the land is under serious threat of soil erosion  and landslides, due to deforestation, slash and burn agriculture, and other unsustainable land uses.   These threats to the environment are also threats to the livelihoods of local people.    

2.2.2. Environmental challenges: Shifting cultivation in the project area  Slash and burn, or shifting cultivation, is an age‐old rotational agroforestry practice adopted mostly  by indigenous people in many parts of the world. In Nepal, this practice is known as khoriya and is a  dominant farming practice in many districts of the country. Under shifting cultivation both gentle and  steep  slopes  are  cultivated  and  then  left  fallow  for  several  years  to  regain  soil  productivity/health.  The practice generally includes the slashing of bushes, the burning of dried branches and the sowing  of crops.    In  north‐western  Makawanpur,  shifting  cultivation  is  observed  mostly  in  rugged  terrain  on  steep  slopes and stony red soils in the sloping uplands. The system functioned well while  the population  pressure  on  the  land  was  low  and  the  livelihoods  of  the  shifting  cultivators  were  based  on  subsistence.  However,  due  to  an  increase  in  population  pressure  and  the  number  of  farming  communities, this sloping land use system is no longer sustainable. The cycle of shifting cultivation  has declined from 15‐20 years to just three to four years and, most recently, even one year. In the  project area the practice of khoriya is observed mostly on slopes greater than 30 degrees, with 57% 

5   

of  the  land  in  the  range  of  31  to  40  degrees,  where  it  causes  serious  problems  of  soil  erosion  and  landslides.  Recently,  shifting  cultivation  has  also  become  a  major  concern  because  it  is  associated  with deforestation, loss of biodiversity, threat of forest fire, emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse  gases,  and  soil  erosion.  The  use  of  kerosene  for  lighting  and  of  fuelwood  for  cooking  also  raises  environmental concerns. The causes and effects of environmental problems in the project area are  illustrated in Figure 1.      Deteriorated    environment  &    E poor livelihood    f f   e   c t   Land  degradation/  GHG emissions (CO2, etc.) s    Loss of biodiversity   C   a Biomass Soil  erosion/  Use  of    u Deforestation  Deforestation  Kerosene  Burning/  s chemical  Land slides    e lamps,  Forest fires fertilizers s    fuelwood    Slash  &  burn    Traditional  terraced  farming system    farming      Figure 1: Environmental problem tree (Source: modified from UNDP GEF SGP 2008)   

2.2.3. Socio‐economic challenges: Marginalised communities and food security    In  Makawanpur,  shifting  cultivation  is  widely  practiced  by  members  of  the  Tamang  and  Chepang  communities.  A  few  Dalit  communities  are  also  involved.  The  three  communities  belong  to  the  59  groups of indigenous people of Nepal and have practiced khoriya for centuries. The Chepang people,  also called Praja, are regarded as the most marginalised and resource‐poor group in Nepal. Out of a  total population of more than 52,000 people, most of them live in Makawanpur (Project Completion  Report, 2). In the project area, the total number of Chepang households is 1,436. The total number of  Tamang and Dalit households is 3626 and 463, respectively (Table 1).     Subedi  (1995)  found  that  shifting  cultivation  was  practiced  on  only  0.3%  of  the  total  land  area  of  Makawanpur by 2,014 households, which is equivalent to 3.8% of the district population. Usually, all  the  members  of  Chepang  and  Tamang  families  are  involved  in  shifting  cultivation.  Men  undertake  ploughing,  hunting  and  tree  felling,  while  women  are  mostly  responsible  for  cooking,  firewood  collection, slashing, planting and harvesting. Children are often involved in the activities conducted  by the female community members.      6   

Table 1: Ethnicity composition in Project Area  VDC  Total   Brahmin  Tamang Newar  Gurung Dalits  Chepangs  Others  HHs*   Magar Manahari  2620  690  1009 127 126 192 209  267 Raksirang  983  35  553 1 2 37 348  7 Handikhola  3155  943  1547 7 72 191 261  134 Kankada  1183  0  517 0 2 43 618  3 Total  7941  1668  3626 135 202 463 1436  411 Percent    21  46 2 3 6 18  5 *HHs = households    The productivity of land under shifting cultivation is continuously declining due to soil erosion. Prior  to project implementation, in 2004, MDI‐Nepal conducted a field survey which found that the value  of  khoriya  land  is  extremely  low  at  Nepalese  Rupee  (NPR)  1,500  to  2,000  per  bhitta  (0.6  ha).  The  main  crops  grown  under  shifting  cultivation  in  the  project  area  are  maize,  millet,  black  gram,  rice  bean (masyang), cow pea and horse gram, produced mainly to meet household needs. The income  from  selling  part  of  these  products  is  barely  sufficient  to  meet  household  requirements  for  buying  additional food, equivalent to NPR 4,000‐5,000 per hectare and year. Prior to project implementation  more than two thirds of the families in the area were found to be suffering from varying degrees of  food  insecurity  and  deficit  from  three  to  nine  months  a  year.  Conventionally,  there  has  been  not  much diversity in the area in terms of fruit trees and vegetables. Banana has not been produced for  commercial purpose but for subsistence and as a “cultural crop”, needed when visiting Sasurali, i.e.  the father‐in‐law’s house.       Other socio‐economic problems are related to a lack of know‐how and low use of agricultural inputs.  The literacy rate is very low among the Chepang and Tamang communities. Many farmers have not  received formal schooling. Input costs for irrigation and improved seeds are usually too high for the  shifting cultivators to afford. The causes and effects of food insecurity are shown in Figure 2.     E   f Food insecurity    f e   c Low productivity   t   s  C   a Low use of  Poor  soil  Weak technical know‐how   u agricultural inputs  fertility   s   e   s    Farm  yard    Input  costs  not  Low literacy  Weak  agricultural  Inputs  not  Intensive  slash  manures  & burn farming    affordable  to  level of  extension  readily  not    local people  participants  services  available  at  adequate    local level    Target    Figure 2: Socio‐economic problem tree (Source: modified from UNDP GEF SGP 2008)  7   

  As  in  other  slash  and  burn  areas  of  Nepal,  land  tenure  is  a  critical  issue  in  north‐western  Makawanpur. A large section of the farming population lacks basic tenancy rights, and government  policies do not adequately address this issue. Many Chepang families have tilled the land for many  generations,  but  still  around  40%  of  Chepang  families  in  Nepal  do  not  have  a  land  registration  certificate.  Tenancy  right  is  based  on  customary  law,  which  means  that  the  person  having  the  first  claim  to  the  piece  of  land  and  who  cultivates  it  is  the  owner.  The  insecure  tenure  rights  of  the  Chepang community have been a serious obstacle to development programmes targeting them.   

2.3.

Project overview 

To  address  these  problems  MDI‐Nepal  proposed  a  pilot  project  to  introduce  and  expand  improved  slope land farming techniques to the Global Environment Facility/Small Grant Program of UNDP. In  addition to the SGP fund of USD 49,000, the project obtained additional support amounting to NPR  8,095,284 (equivalent to USD 117,382) from different co‐funding partners (Table 2). The local bodies  and communities contributed matching funds required for the implementation of different activities  under the GEF/SGP project.    This project was implemented during a 30‐month period from June 2004 through November 2006.  The project targeted 2,000 households in an area of 500 ha of slope land under serious degradation.     Table 2: Budget contribution by co‐funding partners to MDI‐Nepal projects in the area  Fund sources  Sector  Total  amount  Equivalent  (NPR)  (USD) UNDP/GEF/SGP    ‐ 49,000 Co‐funding partners    Local  Forestry  Solar,  ICS,  toilet  construction,  irrigation,  665,499  9650 Users’ Committees  fodder/nurseries Local  Agricultural  Solar,  water  turbine,  toilet  construction,  goat  603,202  8746 Cooperatives/ AMCs  raising,  biogas,  marketing,  seed  inputs,  nurseries  DDC Makawanpur  Agroforestry  200,000  2900 DANIDA  Personal costs for project staff & infrastructure  1,175,931  17,051 (rural road, drinking water, irrigation) GTZ  Personal costs and micro‐projects (rural road) 998,937  14,484 PAF  Irrigation and drinking water 824,253  11,952 Government  Solar, biogas, water mill  1,596,500  23,149 subsidy  FAO  Goat raising  1,172,400  17,000 WFP  Micro‐projects (rural road) 475,562  6,896 Cash by farmers  Solar,  ICS,  biogas,  toilet  construction,  seed  383,000  5,554 inputs  Total (co‐funding)    8,095,284  117,382  

8   

2.3.1. Objectives   According to the original proposal submitted to the GEF/SGP, the main objective of the project was  “to reduce the level of GHGs (CO2, CH4, N20 and others) in the atmosphere that are added through  slash and burn and other wrongly managed agricultural practices.” The specific objectives were to:  y Improve slash and burn practices towards sustainable livelihood of the shifting cultivators and to  ensure sustained productivity level  y Promote energy saving technologies   y Disseminate information among stakeholders on biodiversity protection and conservation.    However,  in  the  Project  Completion  Report  submitted  to  the  SGP,  the  overall  objective  was  reworded as “to achieve improved and sustainable people’s livelihood through the management of  sustainable  land  management  practices  that  contribute  to  combat  land  degradation  and  mitigate  greenhouse gas fluxes that are released through biomass burning” (Project Completion Report, 5). In  the completion report the specific objectives were restated as:   y The development of appropriate land use practices for sustainable production as an alternative  to  the  shifting  cultivation  system,  to  be  used  for  demonstration.  Improved  conservation  and  agronomic practices were to be emphasised. This was to include in situ improvement of shifting  cultivation  practices  and  the  agroforestry  system,  integrated  livestock  farming,  horticulture  development and small‐scale income generation schemes.     y The introduction of several incentive schemes to motivate the farmers to adopt energy saving  technologies such as a solar home system, improved cooking stoves (ICS), biogas, bio‐briquette  etc.   y The  development  of  community‐based  organisations  that  ultimately  take  initiative  in  implementation of project activities.   y The development of skilled human resources to enable them to carry out and prepare a land use  map.     The assessment team agreed to assess the project against the objectives as stated in the completion  report, since these capture the essence of the original objective formulation while more accurately  emphasising the actual priorities of the project.   

2.3.2. Key target indicators and project activities  The key target indicators of the project were:   y 2,000 households (shifting cultivators) participated in the programme by the end of the project  period  y 500 ha sloping land (slash and burn area) brought under appropriate agroforestry models that  avert slash and burn practices  y 1,000 families successfully adopted energy saving technologies (ICS, hydro‐energy, biogas, etc.)   y 20 forest user committees/ agro‐forestry committees successfully applying forestry/agroforestry  regulatory byelaws to improve forest productivity and minimize forest fires  y At least 50 water harvesting tanks established for irrigation purposes 

9   

  The project activities are grouped into five main components which comprise specific activities (Table  3):  (1) Institutional development     (2) Agroforestry in slash and burn area   (3) Energy efficient technologies   (4) Livelihood promotion   (5) Capacity development    Table 3: Project components and activities  Main component  Specific activities Institutional development  Promotion of saving and credit groups;  Agricultural cooperatives Agroforestry  in  slash  &  burn  Application  of  sloping  agricultural  land  technology  (SALT)  system  area  with banana, pineapples and fodder grasses, hedgerows in contour  slopes, and bio‐pesticides Energy efficient technologies  Solar home system, improved cooking stoves, biogas system, bio‐ briquette Livelihood promotion  Fresh  vegetable  farming,  cash  crop  farming,  goat  keeping,  water  harvesting irrigation ponds, and vermicomposting  Capacity development  Training and exposure      

10   

3. Field observations and project activity assessment     The structure of the subsequent project assessment follows the project components. The report first  presents both input and processes of the various project activities under each component and then  analyses the outputs and impacts of each project component. The focus of the analysis is on both the  quantitative  and  qualitative  extent  of  the  outputs  delivered  by  the  project  and  the  social  and  environmental impacts of the project.   

3.1.

Institutional development 

Before examining input, processes, output and impacts of the project, it is important to understand  what type of local people’s groups and networks already existed in the area before the project was  implemented and which have been created as a direct or indirect contribution of the project.    A  number  of  local  user  groups  already  existed  in  the  area  under  government  programmes.  They  include:  y Forest User Groups  y Buffer Zone User Groups   y Drinking Water User Groups  y Irrigation User Groups.    The  creation  of  the  latter  two  types  of  groups  is  legally  required  for  public  construction  works  in  Nepal. After the construction is completed, all participating households become members. Tasks of  the user groups involve book‐keeping supervision, voluntary level contribution and the mobilisation  of local material. They collect a monthly or yearly contribution from their members for operation and  maintenance.    

3.1.1. Project input and process  Both  under  and  outside  the  UNDP  GEF/SGP  project,  MDI‐Nepal  has  assisted  several  existing  local  groups,  mainly  with  mobilising  non‐local  material.  The  main  input  of  the  project,  however,  was  to  promote  the  creation  of  a  number  of  new  local  institutions  that  can  be  categorised  under  three  types:  y Saving and credit groups (SCGs)  y Agroforestry management committees (AMCs) and  y Cooperatives.    Saving and credit groups   Saving  and  credit  groups  are  basic  organisational  platforms  for  local  people,  which  they  initially  create regardless of political ideologies, caste, religion or gender. They collect monthly savings out of  their  members’  earning  and  use  the  funds  for  their  socio‐economic  needs,  i.e.  for  consumptive  or  productive uses. In the project area the typical savings contribution ranges from five to 20 NPR per  11   

month and member. The groups meet once a month to discuss activities and problems they face in  the  development  process.  They  are  governed  by  the  principles  of  regular  savings,  accounting  and  transparency. The main purpose of the SCGs is to:  y Improve access to rural credit to their members at minimum service charges where formal credit  services are limited  y Promote economic activities and create self‐employment opportunities at village level  y Buy food provisions for consumptive purposes   y Provide an organisational platform on which poor people can participate fully in decision‐making  processes  and  enhance  economic,  social  and  political  strength  through  mutual  support  and  cooperation    The  role  of  the  project  was  to  facilitate  the  creation  of  saving  and  credit  groups  by  promoting  the  idea among the community members, with the MDI‐NEPAL senior field supervisor informing farmers  of their opportunities and organising meetings.    Agroforestry management committee   The project also facilitated the creation of agroforestry management committees at the local level.  Their  main  purpose  is  to  promote  agroforestry  in  sloping  uplands  and  the  installation  of  energy  saving technology. AMCs tend to originate at the settlement level. Once fully established AMCs can  proceed to become legally registered as cooperatives. AMCs do not collect contributions from saving,  but receive revolving funds from their members, who pay for the seeds, saplings, biogas and other  items  received  under  the  project.  Thus  households  have  to  return  the  investments  to  their  community organisations, AMCs or cooperatives although the items were originally supported by the  project through the Community Environment Trust Fund (CETF) and seed grant funds.    The main role of the project has been to provide direct support to individual AMC members through  a revolving fund mechanism. To receive this support, individuals must be a member of an AMC, and  membership  is  conditional  on  the  individual  having  an  agroforestry  farm  in  sloping  uplands.  The  project initially paid 100% of the cost of any input items (seeds, saplings, biogas, solar home systems,  etc.). All member farmers received this support through the AMCs. Once members are able to pay  back the cost of the items, they pay to the AMCs – not the project – in accordance with the norms  established by the AMCs. These norms vary depending on the different items (see Table 4).      Table 4:  Revolving fund mechanism (MDI Project Completion Report)  Types of inputs  Project  Revolving fund to be collected  Remarks  supported  rate  from  member  farmers  (NPR/unit)*  (NPR/unit)  Banana saplings  2 / sapling  1 50% of the total cost  Pineapple saplings   2 / sapling  1 50% of the total cost Solar home  5,000‐8,000/set  5,000‐8,000  (400/month) 100% (instalment basis) Biogas  3,500‐5,000/plant 2,500‐5000  (300‐400/month) 100% (instalment basis) * Average exchange rate for the period 1 August 2005 – 30 November 2006: 1 USD = 74.9 NPR    12   

AMCs  opened  bank  accounts,  either  at  the  Small  Farmer  Cooperative  Limited  (SFCL)  located  in  Manahari Bazar or at the Agricultural Development Bank in Hetauda, to deposit the money collected  through the revolving funds.     Cooperatives   Most  of  the  co‐operatives  in  Nepal  are  related  to  agriculture,  farming  and  farm  products.  They  represent the last step in the formalisation process of local farmers’ organisations. In the project area,  the only cooperative which was already in the process of being registered before the project started  was the Janachetana Agricultural Cooperative in Kankada VDC, established in 2004.     The  ultimate  purpose  of  social  mobilisation  under  the  project  was  to  have  local  organisations  of  farmers take over the role of providing financial support for the various activities introduced by the  product. As such a role is easier for legally registered organisations, the project aimed at promoting  and guiding the legal registration of informal local communities of farmers as agricultural and savings  and credit cooperatives.    

3.1.2. Project output and impact   By  its  completion  date  in  November  2006,  the  project  had  supported  the  creation  of  a  total  of  41  institutions, i.e. 30 saving and credit groups, six AMCs, and five cooperatives.     Saving and credit groups  The 30 SCGs had 819 members with women constituting 42% of the total members. The size of the  SCGs varies depending on the type of social cluster, the local geography, the number of like‐minded  people in the community and their eagerness to participate in the group. The groups have typically  20‐30 members, with a minimum membership of 16 and a maximum of 40. The groups were able to  accumulate a total of NPR 1.3 million as monthly saving and disbursed NPR 6.6 million in total.     Box 1: Saving and credit group ‐ example   Manjushree   The  Dandibari  and  Dumsigadh  settlements  of  the  Handikhola  VDC  are  organised  under  the  Manjushree Savings & Credit Group. The Group has 45 members, mostly women (39). The vice chair  and treasurer are women. They started the group by saving NPR 5 per member per month in 1998. In  2009,  the  members  increased  savings  to  NPR  30  per  month.  The  other  income  included  cash  collected from the solar lamps (NPR 46,000). According to the arrangements made by MDI‐Nepal, the  members can take loans and have to return them to the group’s revolving fund. The total saving is  NPR 400,000, most of which is being invested by members in their businesses. The activities include  ginger  cultivation,  buffalo  and  goat  raising,  shops,  and  also  for  the  preparation  of  overseas  employment. The members are affiliated with the buffer zone management committees of Chitwan  National  Park  and  are  also  involved  in  protecting  the  Panchakanya  community  forests.  The  community forest management focuses on the control of forest fires and slash and burn practices.  Some women have shown interest in handicrafts, such as bamboo craft.    13   

AMCs  In  the  four  VDCs  of  the  project  area,  there  are  now  six  AMCs  with  819  members  in  total.  The  six  AMCs  were  able  to  raise  their  funds  to  a  total  of  over  NPR  880,000.  In  a  sense,  the  project  funds  were gradually transferred from the project’s account to the AMCs’ accounts, while benefitting the  AMCs’  individual  members.  After  the  project’s  end  the  AMCs  have  turned  out  to  be  financially  sustainable by collecting saving contributions from their members.        Box 2: Agroforestry management committees ‐ examples   Churiyamai  Community  Organisation  of  Polaghari  settlement,  Manahari  VDC  is  a  spinoff  from  the  Rupachuri  Agricultural  Cooperative  in  2008.  It  has  more  female  than  male  members.  The  organisation  used  to  collect  NPR 10 per month person, and  recently the savings have been  raised  to  NPR  20  per  person  per  month.    They  have  20  households  as  members.   Three  members  have  not  yet  been  able  to  deposit  the  required  savings.  The  total  deposit is NPR 25,000.       Photo: Churiyamai Community Organisation (MDI‐Nepal)    Shanti  Navasirjana  Community  Organisation  in  Chuwarpakha  settlement,  Handikhola  VDC  has  39  household members (37 Tamangs, and 6 each of Chepang and Viswokarma).   The organisation has  seven different organisations at the settlement levels.  Their plan is to install 20 improved cooking  stoves, 22 toilets, 22 biogas plants and 10 solar lamps. Forest protection has been a major exercise of  the  community.  In  several  gullies,  springs  flow  throughout  the  year,  mainly  due  to  upstream  vegetation.  Locals have realised that there is a direct link between water sources and the forest.    Cooperatives  There  are  five  local  community  organisations  registered  as  cooperatives  as  a  result  of  the  project.  Four of the cooperatives are agricultural cooperatives involved in promoting agroforestry activities in  each of the four VDCs (Raksirang, Kakada, Hadikhola, Manahari) while one cooperative in Raksirang  VDC  undertakes  saving  and  credit  operations.  By  the  end  of  the  project,  the  five  cooperatives  had  altogether 512 members and had generated a total sum of approximately NPR 1,800,000 (Table 5).     The major source of funds was the revolving funds during the project implementation, but now, as  with the AMCs, it is monthly savings. The cooperatives also provide loans at an annual interest rate  not higher than the inflation rate, currently about 12%.  

14   

  The  APFED  Team  visited  three  of  the  agriculture  cooperatives  (Niguretar,  Janachetana  and  Churiya  Agriculture Cooperatives) and most members attended the meetings and participated actively in the  discussions. Their achievements are summarised in Box 3.     Box 3: Agriculture Cooperatives  The  Niguretar  Agriculture  Cooperative  in  Raksirang  VDC  (10  men  and  10  women  committee  members)  is  registered  with  the  Division  Cooperative  Office.  Its  chair  has  been  actively  involved  in  expanding its membership and savings. Initiated in 2008 with MDI‐Nepal facilitation, the number of  cooperative members and shareholders has grown to 103 in 2009. The monthly membership deposit  is NPR 20 per member, and the total capital in March 2009 was NPR 259,614. Their main activities  included  planting  bananas,  pineapples  and  broom  grass.  They  plan  to  expand  the  activities  among  the members, with the following targets:  • Banana: 500 plants each for 77 households  • Pineapple: 500 plants each for 51 households  • Broom grass: 10,000 plants each for 103 households  • Goat farming: 15 households    The cooperative provides loans to members for banana plantations and other entrepreneurship, and  also provides support in cases of emergencies and rescues.    The  Janachetana  Agricultural  Cooperative  in  Lothar  Bazaar  was  formed  in  1998,  and  is  well‐  established.  The  cooperative  is  managed  by  the  dwellers  of  Kankada  VDC.  The  twelve  board  members come from Chepang tribes. At the meeting with the APFED team, female members of the  cooperative were not present. The cooperative made initial monthly savings of NPR 10 per person,  and  in  2009,  the  monthly  savings  range  from  NPR  25  to  NPR  150  per  person.  The  Cooperative  has  operating  capital  of  NPR  900,000.  Over  50%  of  their  investments  are  in  goat  and  cattle  farming.  Several members stated that they are pleased that none of them has to approach the local money  lenders. Apart from undertaking activities under the project it has engaged in honey production. It  earned a profit of NPR 75,000 from honey collection. It runs a grocery store along with a collection  centre  for  natural  honey.  In  2008,  4,000  kg  of  honey  was  collected.  A  Kathmandu  based  company  collects  all  the  honey  from  their  depot  in  Lothar.  They  have  two  paid  staff  for  the  business.    The  cooperative  also  collected  218,000  bananas  in  February  ‐  March  2009.  Over  75%  members  have  banana  plots.    Some  households  have  not  been  able  to  grow  banana  for  want  of  saplings.  The  cooperative  members  believe  that  banana  cultivation  can  be  further  expanded  on  a  larger  and  commercial scale.    The  Churiya  Agriculture  Cooperative  of  Handikhola  VDC  (registered  in  2005)  has  172  members  including  62  women,  as  well  as  204  share‐members.  One  woman  holds  the  position  of  a  joint  secretary. The cooperative has installed 40 sets of solar panels, 240 sets of improved cooking stoves  and 50 units of biogas plants (20 under construction). Four members are involved in vermicompost.  The  cooperative  has  share  capital  of  NPR  20,400  with  an  additional  fund  of  NPR  2,832,  a  miscellaneous  fund  of  NPR  8,434  and  grants  of  NPR  45,827.  It  has  also  generated  interest  of  NPR  44,255. The cooperative is in the process of creating a demonstration village by establishing a total of  60 biogas plant units; it also seeks to have 80 toilets, 15 solar lamps, and a bio‐diesel plant installed.  Apart from banana and fish, they have also promoted growing ginger as a cash crop.   

15   

Table 5: Registered cooperatives at project completion (MDI‐NEPAL Project Completion Report)  Indicators 

VDC  Total No. of HHs* covered  Total members (No.) Executive   Female  Monthly saving (NPR) Share amount (NPR) Membership fee (NPR) Revolving fund (NPR) CETF (NPR)  Community Forestry Committees (NPR)  Donations (NPR) Interest (NPR) Other fund (NPR) Total fund (NPR) Disbursement Collection  Loan Portfolios Livestock  Solar  Vegetable Farming Banana, pineapple Trade  Household expenses Other  No. of credit takers Expenditures  Purchase of land Office equipment Cash bank  Bank balance

Janutthan Saving &  Janachetana  Credit Cooperative  Agriculture  Cooperative Raksirang  Kankada 41 50 41 50 9 9 6 6 35,540 77,974 4,100 5,000 820 65 400 220 198,900 ‐ 65,000 15,236 8,250 8,193 10,100 37,012 124,210 342,600 81,000 197,353 30,000 22,600 81,000 197,353 31,000 26,422 154,248 4,083 15,000 10,000 25,000 15 ‐

68,210 5,000

Churiya Agriculture  Rupachuri  Cooperative  Agriculture  Cooperative Hadikhola Manahari 151 165 151 165 11 11 40 35 61,148 15,100 3,200 50 1,210 62,107 302,001 471,100 23,200 18,400 15,000 16,129 33,192 436,028 417,037 49,000 417,037 70,000 120,000 85,000 7,600 40,200 55,900 38,337 65 50,500 7,000 43,500 15,820 1,671

12,600 ‐ 20 163,647 117,000 46,647 ‐ 4,200

16   

585,809 666,707 159,058 666,707 57,500 471,100 28,542 33,565 65,000

Niguretar Agriculture  Total  Cooperative  Raksirang 105 105 11 36 8,730 3,200 1,920 181,142 85,800 10,000 15,000 8,353 314,145 314,245 57,720 314,245 80,851 85,800 33,095 84,499 25,000 5,000

11,000 82 34,985

83 4,505

39,975

53,215

512  512  51  123  183,392  30,600  4,065  243,869  1,057,801  33,200  128,636  74,117  47,112  1,802,792  1,676,342  318,378  1,676,342  265,773  831,148  150,720  125,664  157,800  70,900  74,337  265  253,637  124,000  90,147  84,030  104,061 

3.2.

Agroforestry in slash and burn area  

Realising the disastrous effects of slash and burn farming described above, MDI‐Nepal attempted to  support  farmers  in  rehabilitating  the  degraded  area  applying  both  an  appropriate  form  of  sloping  agricultural land technology (SALT) and a suitable combination of fruits and fodder species to achieve  environmental conservation and local livelihood promotion. The saplings were distributed under the  revolving fund scheme.    

3.2.1. Project process and input      Application of sloping agricultural land technology  Originally  developed  in  the  Philippines  in  the  late  1970s,  SALT  is  an  agroforestry  technology  for  sustaining agricultural production on sloping lands and minimising soil erosion. It is a relatively simple,  practical,  low‐cost  and  appropriate  method  of  diversified  farming.  The  GEF/SGP  project  integrated  various SALT models, namely food crop production (SALT‐1), livestock (SALT‐2) and fruit production  (SALT‐4). Broom grass (Thysanolaena maxima; local name amriso) was planted widely as hedgerows,  following  SALT‐1  principles.  Based  on  SALT‐2  and  SALT‐4,  horticultural  crops  –  especially  fruits  like  banana  and  pineapples,  and  nitrogen  fixing  fodder  trees  were  planted  and  combined  with  livestock  raising,  particularly  goats.  Various  rhizomatous  crops  like  ginger  and  turmeric,  and  food  legume  crops such as black gram, horse gram and rice bean  (masyang) were also planted in between the rows.   C offee 1% NTFPs 30%

Banana 21%

Pineapple 16%

Fodders 29%

Fruits 3%

Figure 3: Planted species by percentage (MDI‐Nepal  Completion Report)    Photo: Row of banana trees planted under SALT  (López‐Casero)  Crop species  In  discussion  with  the  communities,  the  following  crop  species  were  identified  as  appropriate  for  planting khoriya land:  y Banana for sale and consumption  17   

y y y

Pineapple for local sale and consumption  Other fruit trees (lemon, mango, litchi, guava, etc.)  Trees  to  provide  fodder  for  livestock,  particularly  ipil‐ipil  (Leucaena  ssp.)  and  bakaino  (Melia  azedarach)  Non‐timber forest products (kurilo)  Coffee    

y y   Members of 1,524 households in all four Village Development Communities within the project area  planted over 900,000 of plants during the project implementation period (Table 6 and Figure 3).    Table 6: Plantation records of agroforestry crop species (MDI Project Completion Report)   Crops  Plantation Total (No.)  Banana 

193,335

Pineapple 

148,363

Fruits 

31,371

Fodder trees 

265,925

NTFPs 

278,139

Coffee 

7,241

Total 

924,374

   

Banana (Musa paradisiaca)  MDI‐Nepal has supported banana planting on the slopes on a large scale, supplying nearly 200,000  banana saplings during the project period. Among the popular varieties of banana, ‘Hazipure’, a local  variety  with  a  life  span  of  seven  years,  has  been  widely  cultivated,  as  it  resists  dry  spells  well.  The  improved varieties ‘Chiniya champa’ (life span: three years) and ‘Jhapali Malbhog’ (life span: two to  three years) were also tested by the project, but were found not suitable to the slash and burn slopes.  While banana is normally produced throughout the year, in the project area the production is higher  from  March  to  May  (spring),  with  35%  of  the  annual  production,  and  in  September/October  (autumn) with 31%. The lowest production rate is during November/December, representing 4% of  the annual yield.       Pineapple (Ananus comosus)  In total, nearly 150,000 pineapple suckers were supplied by MDI‐Nepal. Pineapple harvest is usually  from July to September, occasionally running into December. The varieties of pineapples planted in  the project area were both local ones and others brought from Chitwan, including ‘Queen’.     Other fruits and coffee   Slightly  more  than  30,000  other  fruit  trees  were  planted  with  financial  support  from  the  project  including orange, lemon, lime, mango, litchi and guava. The climate of the mid‐hills of Nepal is also  suitable  for  coffee  production.  Coffee  needs  shade  for  good  growth  and  production,  making  it  an  appropriate  crop  to  be  planted  under  trees  in  an  agroforestry  scheme.  While  the  possible  introduction  of  coffee  in  the  area  was  mentioned  in  the  project  proposal,  the  implementer  began  18   

with the actual promotion of coffee planting after the official end of the project. In September 2007  MDI‐Nepal  organised  a  one  day  discussion  on  coffee  in  Manahari,  in  which  40  local  farmers  and  a  coffee  specialist  participated,  but  efforts  to  reach  an  agreement  failed.  MDI‐Nepal  is  currently  attempting to establish market links, which it has generally considered a prerequisite for all market  oriented project activities, and if this is successful the implementer plans to support the extension of  coffee plantations from later in 2009.    Fodder trees   Under  the  project,  a  total  of  265,925  trees  were  planted  to  provide  fodder  for  livestock,  including  ipil‐ipil (Leucaena ssp.) and bakaino (Melia azederach). Ipil‐ipil is a thornless shrub or tree which may  grow to heights of 7‐20 m. Leucaena has had wide success as a long‐lived and highly nutritious forage,  and  has  a  great  variety  of  other  uses.  Recently  it  has  been  recommended  for  contour  planting  in  small  scale  tropical  farming  systems  as  a  means  of  soil  conservation  and  fertility  maintenance.  Bakaino is also a fast growing tree and excellent fodder for livestock animals, particularly goats.    Grasses  The project has also promoted broom grass as fodder for livestock animals, as hedgerow to prevent  soil erosion and as farm fencing.  Another potential use is  the extraction of kucho  (broom) from its  inflorescences for sale on the market.     Green manure crops   Green manure crops include stylo (Stylosanthes spp.), velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens) and sunhemp  (Crotalaria  juncea).  Stylo  is  a  tropical  legume,  which  is  hardy  and  drought  tolerant,  and  contains  rhizobium. In good growing conditions it can produce over 3 tonnes of dry matter per hectare during  summer. Velvet bean is an annual plant that grows well on dry, sandy and somewhat infertile soils. It  adds a substantial amount of nitrogen to the soil. Sunhemp is a tall shrubby annual plant that is best  turned under as a green manure or mowed about 70 days after planting.    Wild asparagus  As a non‐timber forest product (NTFP), wild asparagus (Asparagus racemosus; local name: kurilo) has  been  promoted  in  the  project  area  as  it  was  strongly  requested  by  the  participants  given  its  medicinal values.     

3.2.2. Project output and impact   As  a  direct  impact  of  the  project,  fruit  and  fodder  tree  plantations  were  established  on  438  ha  of  khoriya land and since the end of the project farmers have continued the activities with support from  their community organisations and more land has been included in the agroforestry scheme.    Socio‐economic impacts  The  assessment  focuses  on  socio‐economic  impacts  of  this  project  component,  but  also  considers  effects on the natural environment.  

19   

  Banana farming   A survey conducted by the implementer found that at least 538 households had produced bananas  during  the  30‐month  project  period,  amounting  to  a  total  quantity  of  2,904,502  pieces  and  generating a total income of more than NPR 2.6 million (see table 7 and box 4).     As  a  result  of  the  project,  banana  farming  has  become  a  popular  enterprise  among  Chepang  and  Tamang  communities  in  a  number  of  production  pockets  of  khoriya  land  in  the  project  area.  Local  farmers, especially women, have established banana farming as a major income source. Almost five  new  saplings  of  banana  have  been  extracted  from  the  mother  plants  on  average,  and  have  been  planted  in  the  surrounding  areas.  It  is  estimated  that  nearly  one  million  banana  plants  have  been  planted out in the project sites. The fact that 80% of these bananas have been planted since the end  of the project is a strong indicator for the sustainability of this activity.    Table 7: Production and income from the agroforestry crops (MDI Project Completion Report)  Agroforestry  No. of  Unit  Production Average rate  Total income  crops  participating  (units)  (NPR/unit)  (NPR)  households  Banana  538 Piece 2,904,502 0.90  2,616,328 Pineapple  54 Fruit 8,040 12.63  101,525 Banana sucker  113 Sucker 25,132 2.59  65,314 Pineapple  36 Sucker  12,854 2  25,708 sucker  Orange  71 Kg. 4,800 20  96,000 Lime  34 Fruit 18,260 3.45  63,000 Broom grass  64 Mutha 9,216 11.04  101,760 Asparagus  4 Kg. 310 170  52,700 Total  914   3,122,335   As a further  achievement  of the project, bananas started entering the local markets in 2005. Now,  there are a number of production pockets in the villages, such as:  y Niguretar and Churidanda of Raksirang VDC  y Rupachuri, Balbhnajyang, Anptal, Musle and Faribang of Manahari VDC  y Silinge, Einatar, Kharkantar, Devitar, Sikhadanda and Panthali of Kankada VDC and  y Runchedanda, Hattibyaune, Chapal, Chuhwarpakha, Dillipur and Basantpur of Handikhola VDC.     Box 4:  Farmers who introduced banana farming under the project  Polaghari (Manahari VDC) is a settlement of around 20 Chepang families and considered one of the  most deprived ones in the VDC prior to project implementation. It is reached in a one‐hour walk from  Manahari Bazaar. Encouraged by the project, residents Mrs Ram Maya Praja and her elder brother  Mr Ram Bahadur have invested in banana cultivation on the slopes. They started the cultivation in  2004 by planting 1,500 banana saplings. Mrs Ram Maya’s family moved to the area in their father’s  time. The land belongs to the government. Ms Ram Maya is the vice chair for the proposed Polaghari  Community  Forest  User  Group  which  still  needs  to  be  registered  at  the  District  Forest  Office.  With 

20   

the proposition of the community forests, the Polaghari dwellers have protected the forest from fire  and grazing. Mrs Ram Maya has 2,000 plants and plans to increase the number by another 200 plants  in 2009. During the high season (September through November), she earns NPR 2,000/month from  her sales.  She explained that her family members do not have to enter the national park to gather  yams and wild fruits for a living.    In  the  same  settlement,  Mrs  Buddhi  Maya  Praja  has  recently  completed  pitting  one  khoriya  to  expand her banana cultivation which she began in 2004 with 300 plants. She plants every year and  now has more than 2,000 banana plants on her land. She has built a house with the income from the  banana sales. Mrs Gori Maya started banana cultivation with 100 plants. She earns NPR 500 monthly  from banana sales.  She also grows tomatoes, which earned her NPR 900 in 2008. She said that the  first thing that the farmers use to buy from their income from banana is rice. She is pleased with her  income from the banana sales, and compares this with the days when she was paid merely NPR 30 a  day for carrying manure loads.     Mr Lalit Bahadur Biswakarma from Shikhardanda at Kankada VDC, a member of the Dalit caste, has  successfully planted out several hundred banana saplings.     The  Chisapani  area  in  Handikhola  VDC  was  unfamiliar  with  banana  cultivation  until  1994  when  the  first lot of Hazipure and Chiniya champa varieties was introduced by Mr Kali Bahadur from Chitwan.  Now the entire area is known for the quality of its banana.      Mr Chularam Thing, who has planted 500 banana plants of large size, is convinced that the bananas  were more beneficial than the traditional corn or millet crops on khoriya land. Traders use to come  to the field, pay cash directly to the farmers, and collect bananas themselves.     In Rupachuri settlement, Mrs Kanchhi Maya has established banana farms in two sites (700 plants in  Polaghari, and 1,200 plants in Serange of Raksirang VDC).       

Photos: Banana trees under Shorea robusta trees as an outcome of the project’s agroforestry scheme,  Polaghari (Manahari VDC). (López‐Casero)    Some farmers are experimenting with or considering innovative ideas for further use of bananas. In  Niguretar,  the  banana  growers  have  started  considering  production  of  banana  chips.  Nearly  40  packages (at 100 grams) are prepared from 150 pieces of banana. One farmer has started packaging  21   

banana  chips.  In  Dandibari  and  Dumsigadh  settlements  of  the  Handikhola  VDC,  the  local  banana  growers are organised under the Manjushree Savings and Credit Group are planning to make use of  the  banana  plants’  fibres.  They  have  already  started  saving  for  a  fibre‐extracting  machine  which  would cost NPR 50,000.    Market links in the banana business  There is a well established marketing chain from the farms through the wholesalers to the markets.  Local traders, currently about 18 youths, collect bananas from the uphill farms and supply them to  the  wholesalers  in  Manahari  and  Lothar.  The  markets  include  the  local  markets  in  Manahari  and  Lothar, and the nearest urban markets. The wholesalers either operate banana collection centres at  Lothar  and  Manahari  Bazaars  or  directly  collect  the  bananas  at  the  farms  and  supply  markets.  The  main urban markets are Pokhara, Baglung, Shayanja and Gorkha (Figure 4). Most recently, the local  traders are trying to penetrate the foreign market, especially India.    Consumers in major market cities (Pokhara, Baglung, Gorkha, Consumer

Shyanja, Myagdi), Kushma

Retailer

Pokhara

Output

(Mr. Som

Baglung

Waling (Shyanja)

Gorkha (Mr.

Khadka)

(Mr.Subedi)

(Mr. Ram Dhakal)

Bharat Dhakal)

Service Provider

Whole 25%

40%

Seller

15%

20%

Mr. Raj Kumar Praja (Lothar)

Local traders

Manahari Collection Lothar Collection Centre 

Centre

Khoriya Farms (Sloping Uplands)

Production

(Farmers of Manahari, Kankada, Raksirang & Handikhola)

Units

Input Service Provider

Manahari Agrovet

Government

(3 Agrovets)

Agric. Service

NGOs

Private Farms

Figure 4: Market Linkage: The existing market networks for banana (Sub‐sector market map)   

22   

Box 5: Wholesalers  Wholesaler  Mr  Raj  Kumar  Praja  operates  a  banana  collection  centre  at  Lothar  Bazaar.  Sacks  of  banana  are  deposited  at  his  depot  from  where  he  transfers  them  to  Pokhara.  One  sack  contains  approximately 1,400 bananas. He informed that he pays NPR 80 per 100 for common bananas, and  as much as NPR 120 for the best variety. In Lothar Bazaar the APFED Team also met a trader who said  he is offered only a maximum of NPR 60 for 100 pieces.    Ms Sanumaya Chepang has started a banana wholesale business. She collects bananas from the local  farmers, and sells them to the traders in Pokhara.  During peak season (September ‐ October), she  handles about three to four tractor loads. One tractor trip carries as much as 18,000 bananas. The  wholesale  price  for  banana  is  NPR  40  per  100  pieces,  and  may  reach  as  much  as  NPR  100  for  the  hybrid variety. She has experienced no problems dealing with urban traders. However, men from the  same areas reported that they had lost thousands of Rupees to a Pokhara based trader who never  returned to make payment after collecting 24,000 bananas.    Based on the sales record of the wholesaler in Lothar Bazaar, MDI has estimate that during a period  of  four  years  (2005‐2008),  altogether  6.6  million  pieces  (kosas)  of  banana  were  produced  in  the  project area and sold, with a total value of NPR 3.8 million. The price of bananas is valued on a 100  piece  basis.  During  the  project  period,  farmers  could  receive  an  average  of  NPR  55  (approx.  USD  0.70) for 100 pieces; now the price is said to range between NPR 60 and 80 (see Box 5).       Pineapples, other fruits, fodders and green manure crops   At least 54 households produced pineapples for sale during the project period, amounting to a total  quantity of 8,040 fruits and generating a total income of NPR 101,525 (Table 7). A considerable share  of the  pineapples is  consumed at  the  local level  by villagers themselves, with an  estimated 70% of  the total production being supplied to the local traders of Manahari and Lothar. The average price  per piece is NPR 13.    The main impacts of the planting of other fruit trees have been both to provide additional food and  income sources to the farmer households in the project area. Boxes 6 and 7 provide a few examples  of farmers who have planted large numbers of other fruit trees and fodders in addition to bananas.     Box 6: A progressive farmer  Mr  Ramesh  Praja  is  a  progressive  farmer  living  in  Niguretar,  Raksirang  VDC.  Although  not  officially  registered, he owns approximately 1 ha of steep land next to his house. He used to grow crops like  maize  and  millet  before  the  project  began.  Following  the  advice  given  by  the  MDI‐Nepal  technical  personnel as part of the project, he has successfully experimented with pineapple and broom grass.  With support from the project, Mr Praja has planted approximately 50,000 pineapples on his land. He  annually  earns  NPR  50,000  to  60,000  from  the  sales  of  pineapples.  Mr  Praja’s  farm  has  become  a  model for others in the area who want to establish pineapple farming. Although not hopeful in the  beginning, Mr Praja also planted 1,000 sets of broom grass. However, when he harvested 500 sets of  broom (kucho) after one year of plantation and sold it for NPR 13,500 in Manahari Bazaar, he and his  neighbours were very surprised. In 2008, he earned NPR 13,000 from broom grass. Meanwhile many  farmers are involved in planting broom grass in Raksirang and Kankada VDCs.    

23   

Mr  Praja  has  also  planted  out  about  1,500  banana  plants  on  approximately  two  hectares  of  slope  land beside the Jhirkekhola. He now supplies banana saplings to his neighbours at NPR 3 per plant.  During  the field visit, several women  were found carrying loads of banana suckers from  Mr Praja’s  farm  for  planting  on  nearby  slopes.  With  this  income  Mr.  Praja  is  now  fully  able  to  support  his  7‐ member family.    

Photos: Pineapple field (left) and broom grass, Niguretar, Raksirang VDC (MDI‐Nepal/ López‐Casero)    Box 7: Combination of different fruit horticulture  In  the  Raksirang  area,  the  APFED  team  learned  from  Mr  Maniklal  Praja  that  he  successfully  introduced  orange  and  lemon  at  an  early  stage  of  project  implementation.  Others  like  Mr  Ram  Bahadur Moktan from Handikhola VDC, who established a horticulture farm of 125 lemon trees, 200  banana plants, 50 mango trees and other trees in 2004, learned about the project from friends and  neighbours.    In  Rupachuri  settlement,  Mr  Tirtha  Lal  Tamanag  and  his  son  have  not  only  planted  500  banana  plants, but also 15 mango trees, 25 orange trees and other fruit trees.  Prior to fruit horticulture, they  used to gather non‐timber forest products (gittha and bhyakur).    In the Chisapani area of Handikhola VDC, Mr Ram Kumar Chepang has 900 banana plants, along with  fruit trees (35 lemon and 20 mango trees), and 300 bamboo plants.    Mrs  Sukumaya  Praja  of  Polaghari,  Manahari  VDC,  has  planted  out  fodder  grasses  such  as  ipil‐ipil  (Leucaena species), tanki (Bauhinia species), bakaino (Melia azedarach), and nimaro (Ficus nemoralis)  to feed her goats, without having them graze freely.    Environmental impacts  One  of  the  principal  achievements  of  the  project  was  the  almost  complete  halt  of  slash  and  burn  cultivation  on  438  ha  of  marginal  sloping  land.  As  a  result,  soil  erosion  on  the  steep  slopes  of  the  project  area  has  been  significantly  reduced,  preserving  land  productivity  and  reducing  the  contamination of aquatic habitats. No direct measurements on soil erosion were made in the project  24   

area, but using figures on reduced soil erosion from a study on SALT experiences in the Philippines,  the implementer has calculated that the adoption of agroforestry in the project area has reduced soil  erosion  by  1,386  tonnes  per  year.  Even  though  the  application  of  figures  from  the  Philippines  is  questionable due to different soil types, slope gradients, climate and ground cover, there is general  consensus that well‐managed agroforestry systems have lower erosion rates than slash and burn row  crop cultivation.    The combination of various rhizomatous crops like ginger and turmeric, and food legume crops such  as black gram, horse gram and rice bean (masyang), has proved particularly effective in controlling  slash and burn farming, generating income and controlling soil erosion.    The  contribution  of  the  agroforestry  component  to  climate  change  mitigation  by  planting  banana  plants  and  other  fruit  trees  is  less  significant,  particularly  when  considering  the  far  greater  carbon  sequestration  in  the  original  natural  forests  of  the  project  area.  In  terms  of  adaptation  to  climate  change,  the  banana  and  pineapple  varieties  promoted  by  the  project  appear  to  be  well  chosen  in  view of already observed changing precipitation patterns, with winter rainfall becoming scarcer and  periods of drought becoming longer (Practical Action 2007). At the time of the field survey most of  Nepal,  including  the  project  area,  was  suffering  one  of  the  longest  droughts  on  record  with  no  significant  rainfall  for  about  six  months.  Almost  all  the  banana  plantations  visited  were  not  visibly  impacted by the drought.      The agroforestry schemes of the project have satisfied a significant portion of fuelwood needs, thus  reducing  the  demand  for  such  resources  from  the  surrounding  forests,  which  in  turn  has  had  a  positive impact on wildlife habitat conservation.     The  extent  to  which  natural  vegetation  cover  remains  on  the  slopes  under  agroforestry  varies  considerably among the project sites. This is mainly to do with how slash and burn was conducted  prior  to  the  project.  In  most  sites  many  large  trees,  predominantly  sal  (Shorea  robusta),  of  the  original forest had been left standing, providing the necessary shadow for banana trees (particularly  in south facing slopes), but few natural understorey plants remained. Even where both considerable  tree canopy and understorey natural vegetation were found, banana plantations thrived. This led the  APFED  team  to  the  conclusion,  that  with  an  eye  on  preserving  biodiversity,  most  agroforestry  activities  of  the  project  could  be  conducted  while  keeping  natural  vegetation  where  it  does  not  interfere or even fulfils the positive functions of providing shadow and preventing soil erosion. In the  few project sites that were found almost completely free of natural vegetation, the introduction of  agricultural  practices  (partly  as  a  result  of  the  project)  might  have  had  an  unnecessary  negative  impact on biodiversity.    There  is  also  a  high  risk  for  outbreak  of  insect  pests  and  plant  diseases  in  the  fruit  plantations.  Particularly, there is an often a critical incidence of borers during July‐August. Chemical control has  been  discouraged  by  the  project;  it  is  not  affordable  and  has  adverse  effects  on  the  local  environment.  However,  the  implementer  has  admitted  that  the  application  of  bio‐pesticides, 

25   

promoted by the project has demonstrated limitations. The APFED team visited a banana plot where  burning the soil around the banana stems has proved an effective measure against the borer.   

3.3.

 Livelihood promotion  

Improving  the  livelihoods  of  local  farmers  with  banana,  pineapple,  other  fruits  and  fodders  was  a  major  purpose  of  the  project  component  on  agroforesty.  Possibly  because  the  project  proposal  originally placed agroforestry under the objective of mitigation  of the effects of greenhouse gases,  livelihood promotion was included as a separate component of the project.   

3.3.1. Project input and process  This component included the following activities: Goat‐keeping, small irrigation, vegetable and cash  crop farming, and toilet construction.    Goat‐keeping  Goat is a major meat animal in Nepal. Although most rural households raise one or two pairs of goats,  there  is  still  an  acute  shortage  of  goat  supply  in  the  country,  so  goats  are  imported  from  India  to  meet  the  growing  demand  for  goat  meat.  Goat‐raising  is  a  cash  generating  activity  generally  undertaken by marginal farmers, and mostly by women.     When the project was designed, participating villagers chose goat as one of the preferred options for  income generation. In the beginning, the project utilised GEF/SGP funds to support goat farming by  11 poor families, providing each family with four goats. The main purpose was to improve livelihoods  of  farmers.  Later,  the  implementer  linked  this  component  with  a  FAO  telefood  project2,  in  which  altogether 211 households were provided 645 goats. In addition, funds from the Danish International  Development Agency (DANIDA) were also used to provide 216 goats to 125 households.      Where it existed prior to project implementation, goat meat production in the area was found low  due to poor husbandry practices, inappropriate pens and shortage of feed and fodder. Therefore, the  project  also  aimed  at  improving  goat  management  by  improving  pens,  animal  health  and  fodder  availability. It promoted stall feeding and plantation of fodder trees and grasses.    Water harvesting tanks and small irrigation   The completion report acknowledges that the project placed little emphasis on the development of  water  infrastructure  works,  mainly  due  to  budget  limitations.  However,  a  few  low  cost  water‐ harvesting ponds were built to support vegetable farming in suitable areas. Water harvesting is the  collection, storage and utilisation of water run‐off for the production area. The project used low cost                                                                The FAO TeleFood programme is based on donation campaigns with media assistance and pays for small,  sustainable projects that help small‐scale farmers produce more food for their families and communities.    2

26   

multi‐layered, cross laminated UV stabilised Silpaulin plastic sheets. Altogether, the SGP/GEF project  supported  28  water  harvesting  tanks  and  two  irrigation  canals  with  co‐funding  from  the  Danish  International  Development  Agency  (DANIDA)  and  the  Poverty  Alleviation  Fund  (PAF)  providing  benefits  to  134  households  and  covering  an  irrigated  area  of  869  ropani  (1  ropani  =  508.72  m²)  or  44.2 hectare in total (Table 8).     Table 8: Water harvesting tanks and surface irrigation project (MDI Project Completion Report)  Type of scheme  Schemes  Command area Participating  Total cost  households  (NPR) Ropani Hectares Water harvesting tank 28  739 37.6 114  590,065 Surface irrigation  2  130 6.6 20  71,277 Total  30  869 44.2 134  661,342   Vegetables and cash crops  The  project  supported  the  growing  and  commercialisation  of  fresh  vegetable  production  in  the  project  area,  particularly  where  this  could  be  combined  with  irrigation  and  social  mobilisation  and  where road access existed. The major vegetables promoted were tomato, cucumber, beans, radish,  cauliflower, cabbage, peas, onion and potato.        The most suitable cash crops promoted by the project have been ginger, turmeric, garlic and black  grams.  Ginger  and  turmeric  are  shade‐loving  crops  which  were  found  ideal  for  growing  within  the  banana farms. Ginger in the Shikharbas area is a very popular crop.  One farmer annually earns as  much as NPR 120,000 from ginger crop sales. Black gram is a traditional cash crop grown widely in  slash and burn areas. Garlic was identified at a later stage as an appropriate crop in irrigated areas  after the development of water harvesting tanks.     Vermicomposting and pit composting   After  participating  in  four  days  training  in  Kavre  facilitated  by  GEF/SGP,  two  project  staff  provided  training  to  a  total  of  30  farmers  during  the  project  period.  In  addition,  1,000  earthworms  were  provided to each farmer starting in 2004.     Altogether  230  compost  pits  were  constructed  in  the  agroforestry  farm  area.  The  purpose  of  the  compost pits is to produce adequate quantities of compost manures to supply the agroforestry farms.  Field debris and grasses are collected and piled in the pits. Each pit can produce 2,000 kg of compost  manure every three months.     Toilet construction   Although not part of the original project proposal, the construction of toilets has also been promoted  to  improve  sanitation.  Where  biogas  plants  existed,  toilets  were  connected.  As  with  most  other  project inputs, a revolving fund was provided. Altogether 103 toilets were constructed with a total  investment of 185,369 NPR. The field survey did not include a review of the construction of toilets.  

27   

3.3.2. Project output and impact    Socio‐economic impacts   The APFED team found that a considerable share of the visited households had adopted goat keeping  as  a  result  of  the  project.  According  to  a  survey  conducted  by  the  implementer,  102  families  had  benefited  from  this  project  activity  and  recorded  receiving  an  average  additional  income  of  NPR  4,387  per  household  per  year  from  goat  farming.  Table  9  shows  the  total  income  received  by  the  participating households for each VDC.     Table 9: Income received through goat farming (MDI Project Completion Report)  VDCs  Participating Households Production (kg) Amount (NPR) Manahari  61 229 343,252 Handikhola  12 19 26,000 Kankada  18 27 41,258 Raksirang  11 27 37,000 Total  102 302 447,510   The  project  promoted  goat  keeping  mainly  for  subsistence,  but  in  the  completion  report  the  implementer  recognises  a  potential  for  increasing  production  and  ensuring  greater  profits  for  the  farmers by supplying local markets through an efficient marketing system.    Box 8: Experiences of farmers from goat farming  Mrs  Gori  Maya  of  Polaghari  settlement,  Manahari  VDC,  has  five  goats,  and  had  earned  NPR  4,000  from goat keeping by 2008.    Mrs Bhim Maya Praja has raised six goats.  With the income from goat meat she has no problem of  food supply to her family. Prior to project implementation, her family members used to illegally enter  the  national  park  to  gather  roots  and  other  non‐timber  forest  products.  These  days,  they  do  not  practice such activities anymore.    Mrs Sukumaya Praja has now better income from banana harvest and goats farming.  She sold 3 goat  kids for NPR 1,000 each. Prior to the project intervention, she used to carry loads of manure for the  rich farmers uphill for a meagre payment of two kilograms of corn flour, worth about NPR 30.  She  used to earn an additional NPR 100 to 120 per day from selling her labour for other work.  She can  now  cover  her  family’s  rice  needs  (as  much  as  20  kg  per  month)  as  well  education  for  her  four  children, and essential spices for her kitchen, with the income from her banana sales.  Her banana  production was 200 pieces in the first year (2006), and by 2009 it was 500 pieces. Also, she earned  NPR 3,000 annually from goats. She is careful about her banana and other crops, and does not let her  goats graze freely. She has planted out fodder  trees such as ipil‐ipil (Leucaena leucocephala),  tanki  (Bauhinia species), bakaino (Melia azedarach), and nimaro (Ficus nemoralis).     Although the project succeeded in the construction of 28 water harvesting ponds, there has been a  problem  with  the  low  cost  Silpaulin  plastic  sheets  initially  used.  At  many  places  the  plastic  sheets  were  found  to  be  abandoned.  They  were  damaged  by  ants,  rats,  plants  and  other  animals.  The 

28   

project implementer has reacted by promoting the construction of cement tanks, despite the higher  costs.   

Photos: Irrigated vegetable plot (left) and cement water tank (López‐Casero)    During  the  project  period,  187  households  engaged  in  fresh  vegetable  production  and  sales.  As  a  result  they  received  an  additional  income  of  NPR  807,417  by  selling  67,295  kg  of  fresh  vegetables  (Table 10). Farmers made especially good income by sales of off‐season tomato during the festivities  of Dashain and Deepawali.     Table 10: Production and sales of fresh vegetables (MDI Project Completion Report)  Name of  vegetables 

Participating  households 

Total production  (kg)

Average rate  (NPR)

Total income (NPR)

Radish 

25 

7498

6

45,363

Bean 

12 

2368

11

25,196

Tomato 

25 

8740

11

95,616

Potato 

57 

45643

10

456,430



1924

15

28,360

Onion 

23 

2362

14

32,194

Leafy vegetables 

37 

15432

8

124,228

187 

83967

Bitter gourd 

Total 

807,387

  Some 270 farmers participated in  growing and selling cash crops  in the project areas, generating a  total of NPR 1,103,825 in sales. Ginger was sold at NPR 25 per kg, and black gram at NPR 40 per kg  (Table 11).    Table 11: Production and sales of cash crops (MDI Project Completion Report)  Crops 

Participating  households  

Production (kg)

Average rate  (NPR/kg)

Total income (NPR)

Ginger 

31 

7,657

25

191,425

Turmeric 

48 

8,016

15

120,240

Blackgram 

192 

19,804

40

792,160

Total 

271 

1,103,825

29   

  Box 9: Vegetable farmer  Apart from banana trees provided by the project, Mrs Buddhi Maya from Polaghari (Manahari VDC)  also cultivates vegetables including cauliflower, onions, tomatoes and others. She earned NPR 3,000  from  700  cauliflowers,  and  NPR  2,500  from  onions.  Like  her  neighbours,  her  family  members  also  now do not  have to go to the national parks, where they would be  threatened by the park guards  (army and civil), to gather edible wild fruits for their survival.     Vermiculture  farming  quickly  gained  popularity  among  famers.  By  the  project  end,  a  total  of  20  farmers in different locations had altogether 56,000 earthworms. These worms produced 1,460 kg of  vermicompost,  which  is  mostly  used  for  nursery  crops.  Vermiculture  has  also  become  an  income  generating  activity  through  vermicompost  trading  in  the  villages.  Almost  half  of  the  produced  vermicompost, 570 kg, had been sold by the project end at NPR 20‐25/kg, generating a total of NPR  11,400.  The  market  networks  are  increasing,  as  people  are  realising  the  benefits  of  vermicompost  use, and some users in the area are reported to have stopped using chemical fertilisers such as urea.  Vermiculture was a particularly successful activity under the project.    Box 10: Vermiculture experience  Beginning in 2005, with 1,000 earthworms in a basket (1 m x 500cm X 1 m) Mr Lal Bahadur Thing has  been able to produce three quintal (= 300 kg) of compost per year. Earthworms are kept in a moist,  mixed bed of dung, paper and banana stem. They eat the dung and release excreta as good quality  manure. This is collected and used for vegetable farming.     In  conclusion,  the  project  largely  succeeded  in  promoting  and  improving  both  goat‐keeping  and  vegetable  farming  based  on  small  irrigation  technologies.  Both  activities  have  led  to  substantial  income generation of participating households. There is room for further expansion of both activities  amongst farmers in the area provided that the original project implementer and/or local community  organisations  provide  initial  input  in  the  form  of  livestock  or  loans  for  the  irrigation  scheme.  Vermicomposting  is  still  rather  small‐scale,  but  its  success  so  far  demonstrates  potential  for  its  adoption by other farmers, provided that efforts are made to facilitate the expansion of knowledge  amongst farmers in the area.    Environmental impacts  The  project  has  had  a  positive  environmental  impact  by  training  the  farmers  in  improved  management  of  goats  and  other  livestock.  During  the  field  visit,  no  free  grazing  was  found  in  the  project  sites.  The  goats  were  found  in  the  enclosures  and  the  cattle  in  the  sheds.  Whenever  the  families have to graze their livestock, an adult member shepherds their stocks. The project has also  contributed to improving environmental conditions by decreasing dependency on forest for grazing.  Vermicomposting has also had a positive impact on the environment by providing a source of natural  fertilizer.   

30   

3.4.

Energy Saving Technologies  

The project introduced an incentive scheme to motivate farmers to adopt energy saving technologies.  The  scheme  was  financed  both  from  the  GEF/SGP  fund  and  contributions  from  other  donor  organisations.    

3.4.1. Project input and process  The energy saving technologies promoted by the GEF/SGP project include:  y Solar home system to reduce the use of combustible oil (e.g. kerosene)   y Improved cooking stoves to reduce the use of firewood at household level  y Biogas plants for the same purpose  y Vermicomposting.     Funds  other  than  from  GEF/SGP,  namely  the  Community  Environment  Trust  Fund,  the  Seed  Grant  and  public  subsidies  were  also  utilised  to  acquire  the  different  technologies.  Organisations  of  local  famers,  such  as  Agroforestry  Management  Committees,  Community  Forest  User  Groups  and  cooperatives also contributed. These local institutions were involved in organising the distribution of  technologies among their members.    Solar lighting   As  a  direct  input  of  the  project,  altogether  230  households  installed  solar  home  systems.  A  photovoltaic solar system with a capacity of 10‐20 Watt was used in the project.  The system consists  of  a  solar  panel,  a  solar  deep  cycle  battery,  charge/load  controller  and  solar  lamps.  The  solar  photovoltaic panel is rectangular and made of silicon, which serves as a semiconductor. It is a simple  device to generate electric power from sunrays. The lifespan of these panels is declared to be 40‐50  years,  but  they  are  guaranteed  for  25‐30  years.  The  solar  deep‐cycle  battery  is  80%  dischargeable  and has a life of four to six years. The batteries are rechargeable and can be charged automatically by  a  controller.  The  capacity  of  the  controller  depends  upon  the  capacity  of  the  battery  used.  The  controllers are warranted for two to three years.     The lamps used were generally efficient and good power savers. The solar lamps were procured from  and installed by RESS (Rural Energy Solar Support). The details of the solar home system are provided  in Table 12.     Table 12:   Details of solar home system (MDI Project Completion Report)  Amount contributed by different sector (NPR) Total  Technology  HH. = No. of  amount  items (total in  Govt.  AMCs  CFUGs   Farmers GEF/SGP  project area)  Subsidy  CET Fund  (NPR)  Solar home  216  1,325,000 60,700 570,000 393,000 1,134,200  3,482,900 system     

31   

Improved cooking stoves (ICS)   The  ICS  used  were  mud  stoves  having  two  pot  holes  with  plain  galvanised  iron  (GI)  sheet  chimney  outlets.  Altogether  749  households  constructed  ICS  during  the  project  period,  with  the  largest  contribution made by farmers (Table 13).    Table 13: Details of ICS (MDI Project Completion Report)  Amount contributed by different sector (NPR)  Total  Technology  HH. = No. of items  amount  (total in project  CFUGs    Seed  Farmers  GEF/SGP  area)  grant  CET Fund  (NPR)  Improved  749  54,550 82,116 126,613 2,900  266,179 cooking stove    Biogas plant and toilet construction   Biogas plants established in the project area are of 4 m3 to 6 m3 in size and metal biogas stoves are  used.  A  total  of  28  households  –  almost  exclusively  in  Handikhola  VDC  –  installed  plants.  The  total  investment was NPR 457,000, with funds received mainly from the Biogas Support Programme (see  Table 14). Private biogas companies were contracted for the construction of biogas plants.    Table 14: Details of biogas plants (MDI Project Completion Report)  Total  Technology  HH. = No. of items  Amount contributed by different sector (NPR)  (total in project  Biogas Support  Co‐ Farmers  GEF/SGP   amount  area)  Programme    operative    CET Fund  (NPR)  Biogas  28  252,000 43,000 84,000 78,000  457,000 plants    The  APFED  Team  was  shown  biogas  plants  established  by  the  Churia  Agriculture  Cooperative  of  Handikhola with support from the project. The biogas plants are attached to toilets, therefore both  cattle dung and human excreta are used for generating biogas. The gas is formed inside a dome with  the action of anaerobic bacteria. The gas is then piped up to the stove in the kitchen and used for  cooking. The size of the biogas plants varies depending on the availability of dung. In the project area  generally farmers have built 4 to 6 m3 sized biogas plants which are sufficient for a family size of four  to five persons with two to three cattle or buffaloes.    Improved water mills (ghatta)  Prior  to  project  implementation,  people  in  the  area  had  no  access  to  modern  mills  to  grind  food  grains.  They  depended  on  local  ghattas,  which  have  a  very  low  efficiency,  causing  people,  mostly  women, to spend long hours, sometimes the whole day, in front of a ghatta.     The project provided support to five local water mills with an improved madani, which is the turbine  wheel located in the lower part of the ghatta house. The new wheels lead to a substantial increase in  efficiency.  Under  the  project,  a  total  of  NPR  83,785  was  invested  in  the  establishment  of  the  improved water mills (Table 15).    

32   

  Table 15: Improved water mills   VDC and  HHs.  Cost contribution Total  Name of  district  improved  AEPC*  Cooperative Farmers  CET Fund  cost  (NPR)  water mill  (NPR) / AMC (NPR) (NPR) (NPR)  Anaptal   Manahari‐2  51 5,780 1,500 5,500 6,000  18,780 Musedhap   Handikhola‐7  45 5,780 3,000 3,500 6,000  18,280 Botbari   Raksirang‐8  55 5,780 1,500 4,000 3,085  14,365 Nedurang  Raksirang‐8  65 5,780 1,500 4,000 3,800  15,080 Shikhardada  Kakada‐4   70 5,780 1,500 10,000 0  17,280 (Lekhman)  Total  286 28,900 9,000 27,000 18,885  83,785 Contribution %   34 11 32 23  *AEPC = Alternative Energy Promotion Centre     Bio‐briquette   Bio‐briquette is an artificial solid fuel, developed to control pollutant emissions from the combustion  of domestic stoves. It is manufactured from a mixture of coal, biomass (grass) and desulfurizer under  high compression.    The project started at a very late stage to develop bio‐briquettes. Two people, one project staff and a  local  farmer,  who  were  provided  training  by  the  Rural  Infrastructure  Development  Project  in  Kathmandu,  engaged  in  the  production  of  bio‐briquettes  using  banmara  grass  (Eupatorium  adenophorum). For this purpose, the project purchased one compression machine and a few sets of  tools.  Seven  famers  were  trained  in  this  technology.  Given  the  time  constraints  during  the  field  survey, the APFED team did not view the compression machine.    

3.4.2. Project output and impact  According to the completion report, 1,104 technological facilities were installed, comprising 216 solar  home  systems,  28  biogas  plants,  749  ICS,  five  improved  turbine  wheels  for  ghatta,  105  toilets  and  one bio‐briquette compressor.     The solar home system was well implemented with a number of panels installed on house roofs or  on  poles.  One  important  use  of  the  lamps  has  been  for  studying.  Other  use  of  the  electricity  generated included television and radio. People who received lamps were generally content with the  solar systems. However, maintenance is a problem. Several farmers interviewed in the settlement of  Polaghari reported that once the lamps broke they could not be fixed in the nearby bazaar town of  Manahari.  According  to  MDI‐Nepal  representatives,  the  organisation  which  procured  and  installed  the solar lamps does not operate its office anymore in the project area. This constitutes a challenge  for the sustainability of this activity.     

33   

 

    Photos: Improved cooking stove (left) and improved water mill (López‐Casero)    With  the  installation  of  ICS,  the  project  reduced  household  fuel  consumption  by  10%  on  average.  During the field visit in Churidanda,  Manahari VDC, the APFED team noticed that in one house the  traditional  cooking  stove  was  the  one  generally  used,  while  the  improved  cooking  stove  appeared  almost  unused.  The  implementer  explained  that  not  all  households  accepted  the  ICS  for  two  main  reasons. First, the size of the stove does not fully match the larger size of the pans traditionally used  in the households. Second, locals believe that allowing the smoke to impregnate the wood will make  the roof waterproof, which is why many prefer the smoke to be released within the dwelling and to  filter  through  the  roof,  despite  the  noxious  effects  this  might  have  on  health.  The  implementer  assured that they are working on redesigning the ICS to make them match with the usual size of local  pans.  More  difficult  will  be  to  dissuade  people  from  continuing  to  use  the  smoke  for  roof  impregnation.    The  biogas  plants  were  generally  accepted  by  local  people.  Where  they  were  installed,  fuel  consumption dropped an  additional 80% for most of the year, except for  the winter season (60%),  when energy demand is higher. People understandably still require wood for animal feeding and for  various religious purposes. The fact that the Churiya Agriculture Cooperative of Handikhola continues  to  install  biogas  plants  –  with  20  under  construction  –  demonstrates  the  appropriateness  of  this  activity.    A total of 286 households benefitted from the five improved turbine wheels. The mill installed by the  Niguretar Agricultural Cooperative at Raksirang serves nearly 100 households. The female operator  keeps two mana out of four pathis (1 pathi = 8 manas) of flour.     With the compression machine purchased under the project around 1,000 bio‐briquettes had been  produced  by  the end of the project. A test  conducted in  the local market revealed limited interest  34   

and the production has thus been discontinued. MDI‐Nepal has a declared policy of ensuring market  access before promoting continuous production.    

3.5.

Capacity building activities 

In  the  original  proposal  capacity  building  activities  were  described  as  “awareness  raising  activities”  and included:   y Celebration of the environment day  y Policy dialogue involving various stakeholders  y Awareness raising pamphlets/brochures etc.  y Training and exposure visits  y Advocacy and lobbying to protect environment against hazards/disasters.   

3.5.1. Project input: Training and exposures  Out  of  the  five  types  of  activities  above,  the  emphasis  of  this  component  was  on  training  and  exposures,  to  build  the  capacities  of  both  individual  participants  and  groups  with  respect  to  the  various  project  activities.  The  project  conducted  a  number  of  training  workshops  and  linkage  exposure visits, and provided technical assistance.     Table 16: Capacity building (Training and exposures) (MDI Project Completion Report)  Type of training  Total participants (No.) Female Male Total  Nursery training  6 29  35 ICS promoter training  0 22  22 Compost making  17 32  49 Vermicompost training 5 25  30 Biopesticide making  26 41  67 ICS orientation training 440 171  611 Introductory workshop in the field  96 243  339 Eco club formation  14 17  31 Farmers school  5 18  23 Internal exposure visit 77 167  244 External exposure visit 2 3  5 Vegetable farming  11 31  42 CBO strengthening  0 2  2 Goat raising  19 11  30 Fund management  0 1  1 Bio‐briquette training  0 7  7 ICS installation training 17 33  50 AMC  progress  &  planning  (Field  level  94 163  257 training)  Review learning workshop  21 78  99 Total  850 1094  1944 Percentage (%)  43.7 56.3  100

35   

  Altogether  1,944  farmers,  850  of  them  women,  participated  in  this  training.  The  participation  of  women  was  encouraged  by  adopting  field  based  practical  training  methodologies  (Table  16).  The  training organised for capacity development of the participants included:   y Agroforestry in marginal lands (including SALT methods)  y Nursery growing   y Management of cooperatives   y Off‐season vegetable farming technologies  y Integrated soil and pest management  y Training on improved cooking stoves   y Training on micro‐irrigation development  y Marketing management  y Vermicomposting  y Biopesticides    Policy dialogue has also been an important activity. For instance, MDI‐Nepal presented the GEF/SGP  project and its results at a workshop on "Khoriya Management Coordination Meeting", organised by  the District Forest Office of Makawanpur on 22 June 2009. This meeting was attended by a number  of  stakeholders  and  the  first  formal  event  on  options  to  control  shifting  cultivation  at  the  district  level.    

3.5.2. Project impact  The field visit by the APFED Team was too limited to be able to thoroughly assess the direct impacts  of capacity building, but the general impression from both the meetings and the field observations  was that most farmers had received at least sufficient training to implement the key activities of the  project  in  a  successful  manner.  Interviewed  farmers  were  satisfied  with  the  training  they  had  received  by  the  project.  All  the  interviewed  farmers,  who  experimented  with  new  species  and/or  applied  new  techniques  or  technologies,  had  participated  in  a  number  of  the  training  modules  offered by MDI.     As a result of the project’s training, farmers who previously depended on slash and burn farming are  now able to apply the most important SALT methods. They are able to layout their sloping land using  contour planning with the help of locally made A‐frames and plant species. They are familiar with the  proper  selection  of  banana  species,  the  planting  and  tending  methods.  Many  farmers  have  also  learned  how  to  grow  pineapples  or  other  fruit  crops.  As  a  further  outcome  of  the  project,  most  farmers  have  understood  how  to  increase  the  value  of  “marginal”  lands  by  growing  suitable  fruit  crops and different species of fodders.    Most  farmers  are  now  able  to  use  quality  compost  manures  prepared  in  their  own  compost  pits.  There is an impressive replication of vermicomposting methods among villagers after the orientation  training.  Farmers  have  learned  to  make  low‐cost  water  harvesting  tanks  for  irrigation  and  shared  experience on off‐season vegetable farming.  36   

4. Conclusions     The conclusions of the APFED Team on the project focus on the achievements of its objectives and  target  indicators,  and  on  cross‐cutting  issues,  namely  a)  gender  and  caste,  b)  appropriateness  and  sustainability and c) replicability of the project. Table 17 provides an overview of the achievements of  the  project  in  quantitative  terms  as  presented  by  the  implementer  in  the  conclusion  report.  The  following discussion will make reference to these figures.    Table 17: Summary of achievements (MDI Project Completion Report)  Target  Achievement  Remarks  indicators Households benefited (No.)   2,000 1,524 Agroforestry   ‐ 1,089 Tamang: 525; Chepang: 467; Dalits:  27; others: 70  Area under improved  500 438 ha Total plants: 924,374 (Banana:  agroforestry system  193,335; Pineapples: 148,363)  SCGs/cooperatives   ‐ 1,064 Collection of savings: NPR 1,265,028 No. of institutions developed  20 41 Saving & credit: 30: AMCs: 6;  Cooperatives: 5  Household with energy saving  1,000 1,104 Solar: 216; ICS: 749; Biogas: 28;  technologies (No.)  Water mill: 5; Bio‐briquette: 1 No. of water harvesting tanks  50 28   constructed  Human resource development  50 61 Social mobiliser: 4; ICS promoter: 22;  (internal cadres)  Agroforestry nursery foremen: 35;     

Descriptions 

4.1.

Achievement of project objectives 

The overall objective of the project as stated in the Completion Report was “to achieve improved and  sustainable people’s livelihood through the management of sustainable land management practices  that  contribute  to  combat  land  degradation  and  mitigate  greenhouse  gas  fluxes  that  are  released  through biomass burning.” The field survey found clear evidence from a variety of sources that the  project  succeeded  in  significantly  improving  the  livelihoods  of  local  farmers  of  previously  marginalised  ethnic  communities.  Moreover,  both  land  degradation  and  greenhouse  gas  emission  from  slash  and  burn  practices  have  been  significantly  reduced  on  438  ha  of  marginal  sloping  land.  However, as the project did not include monitoring of erosion and emission reductions, there are no  data available that could serve to quantitatively assess the achievement of the latter two objectives.     The performance of the project in achieving its specific objectives is discussed first, before returning  to achievement of the overall project goal.    

37   

4.1.1. Development of appropriate land use practices for sustainable production  In  terms  of  contributing  to  the  overall  objective,  to  develop  and  promote  appropriate  land  use  practices for sustainable production as an alternative to the shifting cultivation system was probably  the  most  important  specific  objective  of  the  project.  The  project  successfully  introduced  an  agroforestry  system  which  integrated  horticulture  development,  livestock  farming,  and  small‐scale  income generation schemes. Rather than the objective stated in the project proposal – the mitigation  of the effects of greenhouse gases – the more important purpose of the agroforestry component was  to improve the livelihoods of local famers by offering them a number of income opportunities.     During the field survey, the plant species chosen for the project intervention in the slash and burn  slopes were found to be ecologically appropriate and economically viable. Banana planting has been  successful in both forest areas and denuded land, as well as on stream banks and in gullies. In all the  visited  sites,  banana  plants  were  healthy  and  fruiting.  Where  the  sites  were  too  dry  and  sunny  for  bananas,  pineapples  proved  a  suitable  alternative.  When  planted  and  sold  in  sufficient  numbers,  pineapples  also  provide  a  good  income  source.  The  project  also  provide  additional  income  opportunities from other horticultural crops, cinnamon, asparagus and broom grass. Other activities  that  contributed  considerably  to  livelihood  improvement  were  goat  keeping  based  on  proper  management  techniques,  vegetable  farming  in  combination  with  irrigated  vegetable  growing,  the  experimenting with and expansion of vermicomposting techniques, and toilet construction.    Although the project proposal did not set a target number of households, the total number of 1,089  households which participated in agroforestry during the project period is impressive. The total area  covered under agroforestry by the end of the project, 438 ha, is close to the original target of 500 ha  (Table  17).  Moreover,  given  that  agroforestry  activities  promoted  by  the  project  have  been  sustainable  and  replicated  since,  the  current  area  under  agroforestry  can  be  expected  to  notably  exceed 500 ha.    As a further  result of the  project,  there has  been a remarkable  drop in the incidents of forest fire.  Local people have taken initiative to protect and conserve forests, and have controlled fire hazards.  In  some  areas  such  as  Polaghari,  the  local  people  have  also  applied  to  register  the  surrounding  forests  under  the  community  forests  system.  The  decline  in  the  incidences  of  forest  fire  will  contribute to conserving biodiversity.   

4.1.2. Development of community based organisations   The  development  of  community  organisations  with  the  intention  that  they  would  take  initiative  in  implementing  the  project  activities  was  another  important  specific  project  objective.  In  facilitating  the creation of 41 institutions by November 2006, the project exceeded its key target indicator of 20  institutions,  i.e.  30  saving  and  credit  groups,  six  Agroforestry  Management  Committees,  and  five  agricultural  cooperatives  (Table  17).  The  formal  agricultural  cooperatives  can  be  viewed  as  the  ultimate  step  of  successful  local  institution  building.  As  a  result  of  the  project,  the  majority  of  the  households  participating  in  the  project  became  members  in  at  least  one  of  the  community  based 

38   

organisations  –  either  the  SCGs  (819  members),  the  AMCs  (819),  and/or  the  cooperatives  (512)  by  the end of the project.    In its assessment of the project, the APFED team employed additional indicators for successful social  mobilisation  under  the  project,  namely  activities,  achievements  and  decision‐making  processes  of  the various institutions.     By the end of the project, the SGCs had accumulated a total of NPR 1.3 million (approx. USD 20,400)  as  monthly  savings  and  disbursed  NPR  6.6  million  (approx.  USD  105,000).  The  AMCs  were  able  to  raise  their  funds  to  a  total  of  over  NPR  880,000  (approx.  USD  13,800),  and  the  cooperatives  generated  a  total  sum  of  approx.  NPR  1,800,000  (approx.  USD  28,300).  In  Chuarpakha  area,  seven  savings  &  credit  groups  have  jointly  formed  the  Churia  Agricultural  Cooperative  to  which  the  households and the groups are members. Local community members no longer use money lenders,  as  they  have  substantial  deposits  earned  from  their  membership  monthly  savings.  The  monthly  savings were initially NPR 10, but the members have raised these to NPR 25 to NPR 150, according to  their earning and savings.    Each of the meetings with the APFED team was attended by large numbers of members including the  poorest members of the  community.  Members appeared to speak frankly about both the progress  made and existing challenges. The organisations have established internal rules for regular meetings,  participatory decision‐making and electing their leaders. In conclusion, the project was successful in  facilitating the creation of a large number of institutions that appear to meet important performance  quality indicators.    Moreover,  the  development  of  community‐based  organisations  was  crucial  to  the  success  of  agroforestry  and  other  activities  aimed  to  improve  livelihoods.  Through  the  revolving  fund  scheme  under  the  project,  the  project  funds  were  gradually  transferred  from  the  project’s  account  to  the  AMCs  account.  After  the  project’s  end,  the  AMCs  have  proved  financially  sustainable  by  collecting  saving  contributions  from  their  members.  Informal  and  formal  local  community  organisations  created  with  the  support  of  the  project  have  ultimately  taken  the  initiative  in  continuing  to  implement activities after the project’s completion. 

  4.1.3. Incentive scheme for the adoption of energy saving technologies   The third specific objective of the project was to introduce an incentive scheme to motivate farmers  to  adopt  energy  saving  technologies,  such  as  solar  home  systems,  improved  cooking  stoves  (ICS),  biogas and bio‐briquettes. The key indicator for this objective stated in the project proposal was that  by the end of the implementation 1,000 households would have “well adopted” at least one of the  energy saving technologies.     It is not fully clear if and to what extent the project surpassed the expected output. The completion  report  mentions  the  number  of  technological  facilities  installed  as  1,104  in  total.  However,  some  households  have  had  two  or  more  different  technologies  installed,  so  the  total  number  of  39   

households could be expected to be lower than 1,104, but higher than 749, which is the number of  the most extensively distributed technology, the ICS (one per household). On the other hand, a large  number of households (286) benefited from the five improved turbine wheels. Therefore, the total  number of households that benefited from at least one technology can be expected to exceed 1,000.  In conclusion, the project has achieved the quantitative target set under this component.     Overall, the APFED team found all technologies in the project area well implemented.      The provisions of solar panels and lamps had a very positive impact in providing lighting to the local  communities, which in turn provided additional opportunities for studying and other activities in the  evening. With the installation of improved cooking stoves, the households reduced fuel consumption  by 10% on average. Where biogas plants were installed, fuel consumption dropped an additional 80%  for most of the year, except for the winter season (60%), when energy demand is higher.    The  biogas  plants  were  particularly  successful  with  a  high  acceptance  by  local  people.  One  cooperative  continues  to  install  biogas  plants  –  with  20  under  construction  –,  demonstrating  the  sustainability  of  this  activity.  Moreover,  the  increasing  number  of  biogas  plants  and  resultant  decrease in fuelwood usage will have a positive effect on forests and biodiversity in the area.    The  two  major  problems  encountered  with  respect  to  energy‐saving  technologies  were  a)  the  unsustainable use of lamps, as the support organisation discontinued their maintenance and supply;  b) the limited acceptance of improved cooking stoves, which can only partly be solved by redesigning  the ICS given the traditional usage of the smoke for roof impregnation. The implementer has assured  that these two issues are being addressed. The discontinuation of bio‐briquette production appears  justified given the limited interest in the local market.    

4.1.4. Development of skilled human resources  The completion report mentions as the fourth specific objective of the project “the development of  skilled human resources to enable them to carry out and prepare a land use map.” The APFED team  did not find any evidence of the preparation of a land use map, but capacity building covered a host  of  different  training  and  exposure  measures  necessary  for  the  involvement  of  participants  in  the  implementation of the project activities.     The training activities related to agroforestry practices undoubtedly paved the way for the project to  succeed  in  curbing  shifting  cultivation  in  the  project  area  by  offering  farmers  alternative  income  opportunities.  Training  on  AMC  progress  and  planning  were  also  fundamental  for  the  successful  establishment and development of the local community organisations.   

4.1.5.  Livelihood improvement  In  conclusion,  the  largely  successful  achievement  of  the  specific  project  objectives  significantly  contributed  to  realising  the  overall  goal  of  the  project,  to  improve  the  livelihoods  of  hundreds  of 

40   

poor households, which subsisted on the limited harvest of crops like maize and millet. As a result of  the project, the communities have been able to achieve an increase in food security and ultimately  an  improvement  in  living  standards.  As  of  April  2007,  the  total  income  of  the  participating  households from the sale of bananas, pineapples, vegetables and cereals planted after the initiation  of the project amounted to more than USD 56,000.     Households,  who  used  to  depend  on  producing  maize  and  millet  for  subsistence,  carrying  loads  of  manure  to  the  uphill  communities  for  a  meagre  daily  wage  or  poaching  in  the  national  park,  have  seen  their  lifestyles  change  after  the  project  intervention.  They  now  carry  their  own  products  of  banana to the local markets and earn on average NPR 3,000 per month. Similarly, once they started  benefitting from the project activities, local people stopped entering the Chitwan National Park and  the Parsa Wildlife Reserve to illegally gather wild fruits, roots and non‐timber forest products. Thus,  the project intervention has indirectly contributed to biodiversity conservation in the protected areas.    Visible impacts of the project in terms of livelihood improvement have been found in all the visited  project  sites.  Sanitation  in  and  around  the  houses  is  satisfactory.  Personal  hygiene  was  good.  Children, women and men are well dressed.    

4.2.

Cross cutting issues 

Apart from the project’s own objectives there are crucial cross‐cutting issues that were included in  the assessment of the project:   y Gender and caste  y Appropriateness and sustainability   y Replicability   

4.2.1. Gender and caste/ethnicity  Organising women and members of disadvantaged segments of society is a difficult task in the socio‐ cultural background of Nepal. This is particularly true for the context of north‐western Makawanpur,  where  most  of  the  poorest  Chepang  and  Tamang  communities  live.    During  the  field  observation,  many women were found to be actively involved in the earning activities under the project. Women  are working as banana farmers and wholesalers, watermill caretakers, fish farmers, etc. and are the  leaders  of  some  informal  community  groups.  In  the  meetings  with  the  informal  community  organisations women spoke on their own initiative, constituted the majority of informants and hold  either the position of secretary or vice‐secretary. There appears to be less opportunity for women in  the  cooperatives.  In  the  meetings  with  the  agricultural  cooperatives,  few  women  spoke  without  prompting. In the meeting with one cooperative, no female members were present.    Figures on women’s involvement in the project are limited to their participation in capacity building  (Table  16)  and  institutional  development  (Table  18).  It  can  be  assumed  that  the  percentage  of  women  who  participated  in  the  training  for  each  project  activity  is  similar  to  the  percentage  that  participated in the actual activities.  According to the figures from the completion report, 43% of the  41   

participants  of  capacity  building  measures,  i.e.  training  and  exposure,  were  women.  This  share  is  impressive given traditional gender roles in the Chepang and Tamang communities.  

  Table 18: Gender and ethnicity involved in the project (MDI Project Completion Report)  Project components  Ethnicity Tamang Chepang Dalit Others  Total Institutional  development  1,141 786 160 206  2,293 (individuals)  Percentage (%)  49.8 34.3 7.0 9.0  100 Women  367 261 56 69  753 Percent of women (%) 32.2 33.4 35.0 33.5  32.8 Income generation    (households)  Agroforestry  440 461 20 17  938 Cash crops  170 186 10 19  385 Fresh vegetables  148 103 10 5  266 Livestock (goat)  55 100 9 4  168 Vermicomposting  10 7 1 1  19 Trading (banana)  6 4 0 0  10 Sub‐total  839 861 50 46  1,796 Percentage (%)  46.7 47.9 2.8 2.6  100 Technology adopters    (households)  Solar home system  181 35 4 10  230 Biogas  17 4 0 7  28 Improved ghatta  3 2 0 0  5 Toilet  39 7 2 5  53 Improved cooking stove 298 376 10 15  699 Water harvesting tanks 76 0 0 7  83 Sub‐total  613 425 16 44  1,098 Percentage (%)  55.8 38.7 1.5 4.0  100 Training (individuals)  839 660 29 82  1610 Percentage (%)   52.1 41.0 1.8 5.1  100

  Compared with capacity building, the role the project could play in promoting gender equity in the  local  community  organisations  established  with  the  support  of  the  project  was  more  limited.  The  32.8% share of women in the local community organisations is satisfactory, but there is potential for  the  implementer  to  commit  the  community  based  institutions  to  increasing  the  participation  of  women. MDI‐Nepal is respected by the local organisations and could thus encourage them to either  introduce  quota  in  their  statutes  for  female  participation  or  resort  to  persuasive  strategies  and  incentives for women’s participation. This is especially true for the high‐level positions within formal  organisations. While two of the vice secretary positions in the informal community groups were held  by women, the role of women in the cooperatives registered under law was less evident. This is an  issue that deserves further study. 

 

42   

In terms of ethnicity and caste, a particular strength of the project was its focus on the poorest and  generally  most  marginalised  communities  in  the  area,  namely  the  Chepang,  Tamang  and  Dalit  communities. The project has successfully met its overall target of improving the livelihoods of these  communities in the project area. In interviews, members of all three communities stressed the very  positive  impact  of  the  project  in  terms  of  additional  income  generation.  Still,  there  appears  to  be  potential  for  a  stronger  inclusion  of  the  Dalit  community  members  in  quantitative  terms.  The  proportion of their involvement in institutional development among the ethnic groups is satisfactory  at 7% (see Table 18), as this slightly exceeds the 6% share of Dalit among the total population in the  project  area.  However,  judging  from  the  numbers  provided  by  the  implementer,  the  proportion  of  Dalit  community  involvement  in  income  generation  from  agroforestry  (2.8%),  technology  adoption  (1.5%) and training (1.8%) could probably have been higher. MDI‐Nepal should study the reasons for  the low participation of Dalits and consider ways to raise this.   

4.2.2. Appropriateness and sustainability   The impacts of the project have turned out to be largely sustainable. More than two years after its  completion, the main outputs are still visible, and in use or effect. The effective social mobilisation  under the project has ensured that various informal and formal local institutions keep providing the  necessary revolving funds for farmers to be able to conduct most of the activities introduced by the  project, particularly those related to agroforestry and livelihood promotion.     The  socio‐economic  advantages  of  commercial  farming  of  banana  and  other  fruits  and  crops  and  from additional income and food sources such as goat keeping and vegetable growing, as well as the  benefits from stabilising the slopes through the various SALT methods including fodder tree planting,  are now well understood by the local Tamang and Chepang communities. Local farmers are now fully  aware of the additional income opportunities and many are open to experiment with new types of  fruits  and  crops.  The  banana  saplings  provided  under  the  project  are  now  mature  banana  plants  which,  considering  seasonal  variations,  render  production  throughout  the  year.  The  banana  plants  also  provide  new  saplings  for  the  farmers,  contributing  to  the  sustainability  of  banana  farming.  To  ensure sustainable agroforestry practices over the long‐term it will be crucial to continuously apply  SALT  methods,  including  keeping  and  planting  an  appropriate  share  of  forest  trees  that  mitigate  erosion and provide the necessary shadow for certain crops, as well as applying natural fertilisers to  guarantee soil fertility. A major challenge to the future of the agroforestry component of the project  is that ownership of khoriya lands is yet to be resolved. The farmers have planted out thousands of  banana and other cash crops in the lands which legally belong to the Department of Forests.    With respect to the component of energy saving technologies, the question of sustainability is more  difficult  to assess. One of  the technologies, the solar home system, has faced a  challenge  with the  repair of broken lamps, as the supplier is no longer providing support services. This problem will have  to  be  addressed  either  by  the  project  implementer  under  a  different  project  or  by  the  community  organisations, if individuals cannot afford to purchase new lamps. Improved cooking stoves faced a  problem  of  low  acceptability  among  some  locals  as  they  were  not  appropriate.  To  ensure  a 

43   

sustainable use of the stoves, they need to be redesigned to match with the usual size of local pans,  as discussed above. The use of biogas plants, on the other hand, proved particularly appropriate and  sustainable in the settlements where they were installed under the project; the local cooperative has  continued  the  activity  of  installing  biogas  plants  here.  Vermicomposting  has  also  turned  out  sustainable  where  introduced  by  the  project  and  replicated  by  interested  farmers  in  the  neighbourhood, but there is a potential for further expanding this technique throughout the project  area. Bio‐briquette production is the only activity under the project that has been discontinued, but  the implementer provided a good reason for this.     Since the completion of the GEF/SGP project, MDI‐Nepal has promoted additional plantation in some  530 hectares of sloping land. Altogether, 1.1 million plants (40% banana and 60% broom grass) have  been  planted  so  far,  according  to  information  provided  by  MDI‐Nepal.  The  area  covers  the  sloping  uplands of a total 1,606 households, mainly in Raksirang VDC but also in three other VDCs.    

4.2.3. Replicability and ongoing replication   The  successful  implementation  of  agroforestry  practices  and  other  project  activities  in  the  hills  of  Makawanpur by the project represents a good case for replication for other hilly areas of Nepal and  abroad  with  similar  geographical  and  socio‐economic  conditions.  After  the  official  project  termination,  various  successful  project  interventions  have  been  replicated  by  other  hill  farmers  in  and outside the project area on a large scale. The most widely replicated activities have been banana  plantations and biogas installations.    The  APFED  team  also  visited  an  area  in  neighbouring  Chitwan  District  where  the  agroforestry  component of the project is being replicated. The area is Kuyalghari in Dahakhani VDC. It comprises  steep slopes in the narrow corridor formed by the Narayani River between Mugling and Narayangarh  on the Chitwan‐Kathmandu highway.    Box 14: Replication of project’s agroforestry component in Dahakhani VDC, Chitwan District   Mr  Raju  Chepang  began  planting  bananas  on  his  sloping  land  in  2008.  He  has  approximately  700  plants,  and  has  prepared  pits  for  another  300  plants.    He  sells  the  bananas  in  Mugling,  a  nearby  market  about  9  km  to  the  north.  He  earns  NPR  7,000  to  13,000  per  year  from  his  sales.  He  is  also  supplying  banana  saplings  to  17  households  who  have  prepared  planting  pits  and  his  farm  has  become  the  main  source  of  banana  saplings  in  the  new  project  area.  He  informed  that  nearly  100  households were ready to plant bananas.    MDI  has  produced  a  booklet  titled  the  “Renaissance  of  Slash  and  Burn  Farming  (Khoriya  Farming).  Experience  from  Makawanpur”,  that  can  serve  as  a  manual  for  areas  interested  in  replicating  activities promoted by the project. In recognition of MDI’s achievements in bringing positive changes  among the poor people in Makawanpur, the MDI‐Nepal Chair has been invited to the Asia regional  meeting  of  the  Civil  Society  Organisation  in  Bangkok  on  9  April  2009  to  present  on  the  implementation and results of the project. 

44   

  The APFED team and MDI‐Nepal held a consultative meeting with local government officials. Officials  of  seven  different  local  government  line  agencies  participated  in  the  consultative  meetings.  They  represented  local  development,  forestry,  soil  conservation,  nature  conservation,  agriculture,  water  management and cooperative organisations. The NGO federation, which has become member of the  cooperative, was also represented. The overall comments and feedbacks of the participants referred  to  options  for  best  utilisation  of  the  khoriya  lands.  The  Local  Development  Officer  stated  that  his  office would consider the project’s activities for replication in the district.    Of particular relevance for the future replication of the project is the above‐mentioned workshop on  "Khoriya  Management  Coordination  Meeting",  organised  by  the  District  Forest  Office  of  Makawanpur on 22 June 2009. This meeting, where MDI‐Nepal presented the GEF/SGP project and  its results, was reported to have had a considerable impact at the district level. At the meeting the  District Forest Officer pointed out the achievements made by the GEF/SGP project and called upon  all  stakeholders  to  develop  integrated  programmes  for  fighting  slash  and  burn  problems  in  the  district. 

45   

5. Recommendations    Overall, the project was implemented efficiently and successfully, its main objectives were achieved,  and most of its activities are sustainable and replicable. On the basis of the above conclusions and  the  consultations  made  with  participants,  project  implementers  and  line  agencies,  we  propose  the  following recommendations for further strengthening the approach advocated by the project.    y Project formulation  Reformulation  of  project  objectives  after  implementation  has  begun  should  be  avoided  as  it  is  confusing to third parties and makes assessment difficult. If the original formulation is found wanting,  which seems to have been the case with the original overall objective of this project (“climate change  mitigation”), then revision of project objectives cannot be avoided. In such cases, the implementer  should record, justify, and announce the change in project objectives.    y Social Mobilisation   Social mobilisation, including the creation of both informal and formal local community organisations,  is  one  of  the  most  successful  and  sustainable  components  of  the  project.  Recommendations  to  further strengthen this component are:   (1) Link the agricultural cooperatives and the savings and credit groups with the existing community  based  organisations  especially  community  forests  user  groups  and  the  buffer  zone  user  committees.  (2) To address the unresolved tenure rights in khoriya land:  a) Reach out to local and national authorities, including the Department of Forests, highlighting  the achievements of the project and seeking collaboration and support for further activities;   b) Initiate a multi‐stakeholder dialogue at the local level to identify options for solving the issue  of land tenure and use rights;  c) Follow  the  existing  laws  and  policies  when  implementing  project  interventions  on  government lands.      y Agroforestry   Agroforestry  was  another  successful  and  sustainable  component  of  the  project.  The  only  concerns  here were (1) how to optimise the planting of various crops and (2) how to further reduce the impact  on biodiversity and soil erosion:   (1) Consider other alternative crops such as cinnamon and lemon, along with banana, broom grass  (amriso) and pineapple;  (2) Retain existing natural vegetation including trees and shrubs to the extent possible;  (Banana  plantations,  especially  on  south  facing  slopes  prefer  a  certain  degree  of  shadow;  in  addition, this will contribute to maintain soil and biodiversity on the slopes.)    (3) Consider conducting monitoring of emission reductions focusing on representative test plots. 

46   

  • Livelihood promotion  The  various  activities  under  the  component  livelihood  were  generally  successful,  but  there  is  potential to increase the number of participating households:   –

Emphasise extension of the successful activities, particularly small‐scale irrigation for vegetable  farming and vermiculture.  

  y Energy‐Saving Technologies  Most  of  the  energy‐saving  technologies  brought  a  considerable  improvement  of  the  participants’  livelihoods, but there have been some problems related to acceptance and sustainability.   –

Use technologies that do not depend on a single provider;  



Assist community organisations in finding lamps that can replace the broken ones; 



Redesign  the  improved  cooking  stoves  to  match  the  usual  pan  size,  in  order  to  increase  their  acceptance. 

  y Gender and caste  Members of all marginalised ethnicities and castes participated under the project, but representation  from the Dalit community in livelihood activities was smaller than their share of total population in  the project area. Women and men participated in most of the project’s activities in similar numbers,  but there is potential for more female involvement in formal local community organisations.   –

Ensure that all poor ethnic groups which practiced or still practice slash and burn are involved in  future  projects  in  a  proportion  that  corresponds  with  their  share  of  the  total  population  of  shifting cultivators; 



Encourage  and  promote  a  more  active  role  of  women  in  the  formal  community  organisations,  especially the agriculture cooperatives. 

 

47   

References      MDI‐Nepal  (Manahari  Developement  Institute)  2003.  A  proposal  on  mitigation  of  the  effect  of  greenhouse  gases  (CO2,  CH4,  N2O  &  other)  through  controlling  slash  and  burn  practices  among  shifting  cultivators  in  north‐western  Makawanpur.  Submitted  to  United  Nations  Development  Programme and Global Environment Facility Small Grant Programme.    MDI‐Nepal. 2007. Mitigation of the effects of CO2 and other greenhouse gases by controlling slash  and burn practices. (Project Number: Nep/03/11). Project completion report. (June 2004 ‐ February  2007).     UNDP GEF SGP (United Nations Development Programme Global Environmental Facility Small Grant  Programme).  2008.  Renaissance  of  Slash  and  Burn  Farming  (Khoriya  Farming).  Experience  from  Makawanpur.  Written and compiled by Mr. Narayan Shrestha.      

48   

Appendix: Schedule of the field survey       Tuesday, 17 March 2009    4:00‐6:00 PM  Discussion at MDI office, Hetauda    Wednesday, 18 March 2009    7:00 AM  Departure to field, Niguretar (Raksirang VDC)  8:30 AM  Arrival at Niguretar  8:30‐11:00 AM  Field observations  11:30‐12:30 PM  Discussion  with  beneficiary  members  in  Niguretar  Agricultural  Cooperative Ltd.  13:00 PM  Arrival at Manahari  13:00‐14:00 PM  Lunch in Manahari Bazar  14:00‐16:00 PM  Field visits in Shikharbas community (Handikhola VDC)    Return to Hetaunda    Thursday, 19 March 2009    6:00  AM  Departure to Manahari  6:30‐7:00 AM  Breakfast (Manahari)  7:00 AM  Departure to field, Polaghari (Manahari VDC)  8:00 AM  Arrival at Polaghari  8:00‐11:30 AM  Field observations  11:30 AM‐12:30 PM  Discussion  with  beneficiary  members  of  Churiyamai  Community  Organization    13:30 PM  Arrival at Manahari Bazar  13:30‐14:30 PM  Lunch in Manahari  14:30‐16:30 PM  Field visit in Lothar    Discussion  with  Janchetana  Cooperative  members  (Kankada  VDC)  in  Lothar    Return to Hetaunda    Friday, 20 March 2009    7:00 AM  Departure to field, Chuwarpakha (Handikhola VDC)  8:00 AM‐11:00 AM   Field observations around Chuwarpakha  11:00 AM‐13:00 PM    Discussion with members of Churiya Agricultural Cooperative Ltd.  13:00 PM ‐ 14:00    Lunch in Chuwarpakha  15:00 PM    Arrival in Hetaunda  15:30‐17:30 PM    Consultative Meeting with MDI, LDO+DFO     Saturday, 21 March 2009    7:00 AM  Departure to field, Churidanda (Manahari VDC)   8:30 AM  Arrival at Churidanda 

49   

8:30‐10:30 AM  12:00 Noon  12:00‐13:00 PM  13:00 PM 

15:30 ‐16:00 PM  16:00 PM         

Field observation of Kanchhi Maya farm and discussion  Arrival at Manahari Bazar  Lunch in Manahari  Departure to Dahakhani VDC (Chitwan ‐ new area under expansion) ‐ on  the  way  to  Kathmandu,  in  between  Mugling  ‐  Narayagarh  corridor,  attached with highway)  Field observation in Kuyalghari, Dahakhani  Departure to Kathmandu 

50