[ SustaiN 2013 ] CONFERENCE PROCEEDING

The quality of papers received was a testament to the reputation that the conference has been building over the past 3 years. Papers presented at SUST...

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2013 The 4th International Conference on

Sustainable Future for Human Security

[ SustaiN 2013 ]

CONFERENCE PROCEEDING ISSN: 2188-0999

Clock Tower Centennial Hall | Kyoto University Kyoto - Japan | 19 - 21 October 2013

Supported by :

Organized by : Society

The Organization for the Promotion of International Relations Kyoto University

KBRI Jepang and KJRI - Osaka

Proceeding of SustaiN 2013 ISSN: 2188-0999 Judul The 4th International Conference on Sustainable Future for Human Security SUSTAIN 2013 Editorial The 4th International Conference on a Sustainable Future for Human Security (SUSTAIN 2013) was held at Kyoto University (Japan) on 19-21 October, 2013. The conference was organized by SustaiN Society and the Indonesian Students Associations of Kyoto, with the support of the Organization for the Promotion of International Relations (OPIR) Kyoto University, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH), Global Center for Education and Research on Human Security Engineering (HSE), Global COE Program for Sustainability / Survivability Science for a Resilient Society Adaptable to Extreme Weather Conditions (GCOE-ARS), and Inter-Graduate School Program for Sustainable Development and Survivable Societies (GSS). The conference originated from the need to provide an inter-disciplinary forum where the most serious problems affecting a sustainable future for human security could be discussed, in recognition of the fact that many future problems cannot be solved by a “siloed” approach. The emphasis on sustainable futures is in response to the general awareness of the need to solve numerous human-related problems resulting from the rapid growth of modern society. The topic of sustainable futures for human security needs to be discussed in an integrated way, in accordance with the principles of sustainability, considering energy and materials supply, economies and trade, technology, cities, agriculture, social and environmental aspects. To continue providing adequate technology to cope with the demands of human quality of life requires intensive research and development with multidisciplinary perspectives. Research and development towards achieving future human security should embrace sustainability perspectives, to avoid negatively impacting the environment and necessitating or exacerbating inefficient use of natural reserves, increasing emissions and hazardous wastes and jeopardizing human health and society. The conference covered a wide range of issues with the aim of highlighting potential issues and paths towards a sustainable future. It attracted a high level of attendance from countries of the global North and South, with a wide geographical coverage. Overall, 160 participants were involved, with 120 presentations over the course of the conference. The quality of papers received was a testament to the reputation that the conference has been building over the past 3 years.

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Papers presented at SUSTAIN 2013 were divided into five thematic areas: (1) Energy and Environment (EnE); (2) Sustainable Forestry and Agriculture (FA); (3) Sustainable Built Environment in Tropical Hemisphere Countries (BE); (4) River Basin and Disaster Management (RnD); (5) Social Science and Economics (SE). Under these broad areas, a wide-ranging series of presentations was given, which elaborated on current research across Asia and the world. Being held in Kyoto, a city of great cultural heritage, the participants also took part in a tour of some of the main sights and experiences that link modern and ancient Japan. The two programmed days of the conference each commenced with keynote presentations which, like the conference itself, were wide-ranging. In the first session on day one, Dr. Ir. Edi Effendi Tedjakusuma, delivered an address on issues of a sustainable future for human security in the context of Indonesia. Dr. Puppim de Oliveira, Assistant Director and Senior Research Fellow at the United Nations University Institute of Advanced Studies (UNU-IAS), then discussed the future sustainability of cities in Asian nations. In the last keynote, Professor Satoshi Fujii, a Japanese cabinet adviser on Disaster Prevention and Reduction, introduced Japanese policy towards a more resilient country. The organizers appreciate the support and assistance of the co-operating organizations, the participants, presenters and staff. The next SUSTAIN conference is highly anticipated by all the attendees of SUSTAIN 2013 and the committee expect to further build on the success of this year’s event.

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Proceeding of SustaiN 2013 ISSN: 2188-0999 Table of Content Chief Editor N. Agya Utama Environmental Engineering, Surya University Summarecon Serpong, Tangerang 15810, Indonesia Editors Ben Mclellan, Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University Suharman Hamzah, Civil Enginering Department, Hasanuddin University Agus Trihartono, Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Jember University Apip, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Indonesia Hatma Suryatmojo, Faculty of Forestry, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia Slamet Widodo, Kyoto University, Japan M. Ery Wijaya, Surya University, Indonesia S. Khoirul Himmi, Research Center for Biomaterials, LIPI, Indonesia & RISH, Kyoto University, Japan Miguel Esteban, University of Tokyo, Japan Hooman Farzaneh, Asaad University, Iran Niken Prilandita, Kyoto University, Japan Novri Susan, Doshisa University, Japan Haryono Huboyo, Universitas Diponegoro, Indonesia Makruf Nurudin, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia Yulianto Prihatmaji, Universitas Islam Indonesia, Indonesia

Committee and Secretariat Wignyo Adiyoso, Ritsumeikan University, Japan Nino Viartasiwi, Ritsumeikan University Cindy Valentine, Kyoto University, Japan Bhakti Eko Nugroho, Ritsumeikan University, Japan Prawira F. Belgiawan, Kyoto University, Japan Ari Rahman, Ryukoku University, Japan Hendy Setiawan, Kyoto University, Japan Gerry Tri Satya Daru, Kyoto University, Japan

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© 2013 The Authors. Published by SustaiN Society. Selection and peer-review under responsibility of the SustaiN conference committee and supported by Kyoto University; (RISH), (OPIR), (GCOE-ARS) and (GSS) as co-hosts.

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Proceeding of SustaiN 2013 ISSN: 2188-0999 Table of Content The 4th International Conference on Sustainable Future for Human Security SUSTAIN 2013

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Table of Contents EDITORIAL..........................................................................................................................................................................

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TABLE OF CONTENT.........................................................................................................................................................

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.....................................................................ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT.................................................................

1

Optimal Scheduling of Fossil-Fuel Power Plant in Anticipating Peak Load Demand: A Case Study in PT. PLN Manokwari Adelhard B. Rehiara, Elias K. Bawan, Bibiana R. Wihyawari...............………………………………………........

2

Economic and energy policy for coalbed methane development in Indonesia: a review paper Heru Prasetio, Danang Sismartono, Bambang Wicaksono, Ika Kaifiah.....................................................................

13

N-CBlast: Disinfectant innovation from nanochitosan shrimp shell waste as antimicrobial for Bogor’s mall toilet Asya Fathya Nur Zakiah, Mada Triandala Sibero, Nadia Fitriana..............................................................................

20

Bioethanol production from Nipa Sap in Riau Province Coastal Zone Chairul, Silvia Reni Yenti, Heriyanti, Irsyad Abdullah..............................................................................................

24

FAME (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester) Based on Mahkota Dewa Fruit (Phaleria marcocarpa) as A New Alternative Bio-Fuel Iga Nugraheni, Mariani Yunita, Asep Andi A............................................................................................................

27

........................SUSTAINABLE BUILT ENVIRONMENT IN TROPICAL HEMISPHERE COUNTRIES......................

34

Wood Originality Based Evaluation on Restoration of Third Alang as Wooden Cultural Heritage of Tana Toraja Traditional Houses Components on Nanggala Sites Yustinus Suranto.........................................................................................................................................................

35

Urban Acupuncture: Revival of Urban Spaces and City Villages by Community Activation and Creativity Dwinita Larasati, Tb. Fiki Ch. Satari..........................................................................................................................

43

The Status of Environmental Impact Analysis of Building Materials in Thailand : LCA Methodology Approach Nachawit Tikul............................................................................................................................................................

50

Toward a better life: Aged-Friendly City, sidewalks layout design influence in elders Active Living (Taipei Taiwan, La Plata, Argentina) Marjorie E. Mejia........................................................................................................................................................

56

Landscape Infrastructure as Strategy in the Design of Transport Infrastructure. Case study: Surabaya and Malang, Indonesia Subhan Ramdlani........................................................................................................................................................

64

On the Sustainable Management and the Reuse Strategies of Taiwanese Elementary Schools Trai-shar Kao, Hui-fen Kao, Yi-jen Tsai, Chung-chien Tsai.....................................................................................

71

Development of Connection System Bamboo Truss Structures Astuti Masdar, Bambang Suhendro, Suprapto Siswosukarto, Djoko Sulistyo...........................................................

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..........................................................RIVER BASIN AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT................................................

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The Ecological Perceptions and Communities Participations on River Conservation Based on Bioindicator Odonata Knowledge in Upper Watershed Area: A Case Study in Batu District, East Java, Indonesia Abdulkadir Rahardjanto, Haryoto Kusnoputranto, Dwita Sutjiningsih, Francisia SSE Seda....................................

88

Kukuyaan program as a form of community empowerment and river revitalization (case study Cikapundung river, Bandung, West Java, Indonesia) Karina Isna Irawan......................................................................................................................................................

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The Analysis of Community Adaptation Process in Constructing Disaster-Prone City (a Study on West Padang)

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Proceeding of SustaiN 2013 ISSN: 2188-0999 Table of Content

Status of Heavy Metal Concentration in Water of Citarum River at Selected Sites in Bandung Residence Eka Wardhani..............................................................................................................................................................

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Difference of Response Hydrology Using Mock Model and Integrated NRCS with Base Flow at Krueng Peusangan Watershed, Aceh, Indonesia Ichwana, Zulkifli Nasution, Sumono, Delvian...........................................................................................................

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...........................................................SOCIAL AND ECONOMICS DEVELOPMENT......................................................

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PILKADA: Clans, Ethnic Revivalism, and Local Democracy in Indonesia (A Lesson from Lampung) Arizka Warganegara, Yulianto, Ari Darmastuti, Arifudin.........................................................................................

130

The Conservation of Temuan Indigenous Cultural Heritage at Kampong Charik, Johol, Kuala Pilah, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia. Salbiah Abd Rahman..................................................................................................................................................

137

Strategies of Rural Transport Service Provision Dewanti, Djunaedi Achmad, Parikesit Danang..........................................................................................................

143

The Effect of Infrastructure on Food Security Suraya Adnan, Fauzul Rizal Sutikno..........................................................................................................................

151

Impact of AEC Connectivity on Local Communities: Comparative Studies of Dawei Deep Sea Port in Myanmar, the Eastern Seaboard in Thailand and the Strait of Malacca in Malaysia after the Implementation of the ASEAN Economic Community in 2015: Challenges and Opportunities Nattaporn Sittipat........................................................................................................................................................

157

Contributing Factor of Military Assistance Toward Police In Handling Social Conflict In Indonesia Agus Brotosusilo, Sahat K Panggabean, Herdis Herdiansyah....................................................................................

164

Weaving the future: do we want to witness the end of our civilization? Cungki Kusdarjito, Any Suryantini............................................................................................................................

170

Fair trade organic coffee production in Southern Lao PDR.—Vulnerability or strength of household coffee farmers Sengsawai Kommasith, Apisak Dhiravisit.................................................................................................................

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.......................................................SUSTAINABLE FORESTRY AND AGRICULTURE.................................................

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Effect of Gibberellic Acid and Nitrogen on Dry Matter, Harvest Index and Solar Radiation Conversion Efficiency in Peanut at Wetland Agus Suprapto, Yogi Sugito, S.M. Sitompul, and Sudaryono....................................................................................

183

Analysis of Ear Mushroom (Auricularia sp.) Cultivation using The Cutting Waste of Forest Tree Species Abdullah Azzam Mahmud, Elis Nina Herliyana, Irdika Mansur...............................................................................

189

Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Sacred Groves in the Raigad District, Maharashtra State, India Dr.Madhuri Kulkarni, Dr. Prakash Dongre................................................................................................................

193

Land use change of urban agriculture using GIS in Nakhon Ratchasima Municipality, Northeast Thailand Mattika Chaimeerang Phandee...................................................................................................................................

201

Message Appeal and Presentation Order of Public Service Ads: Experimental Study of Egg Enriched with Omega-3 Promotion Suci Paramitasari Syahlani, Bernardinus Maria Purwanto, Mujtahidah Anggriani Ummul Muzayyanah.................

208

Assesment of LD50 of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) Seeds Extract as Bio-Insecticide for Controlling Disruption Rove Beetles (paederus sp.) in Urban Area Winda Wahyu Setya Rahmah , Elsy Rahmi Furi, Ajeng Herpianti Utari, Nur Fitria Anggraini, Andriyanto...........

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Prospect of School Milk Program in Rural Indonesia: Case study at Bantul Regency, Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta Province Sudi Nurtini, Mujtahidah Anggriani Ummul Muzayyanah........................................................................................

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Zoonoses Impact Endoparasites of Orangutan Ex-Captive at Lamandau River Wildlife Reserve, Central Borneo M. J. Assidiqi , Y. T. Halal, M. Mirsageri , Umi Cahyaningsih, Zulfiqri..................................................................

223

Market Conduct of Vegetable Seed Industry In Indonesia

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Henita. Rahmayanti, Emirhadi Suganda.....................................................................................................................

Proceeding of SustaiN 2013 ISSN: 2188-0999 Table of Content Bambang Sayaka......................................................................................................................................................... Resistance for Two Woods Species from School Building with Cigarette Waste Water to Subterranean Termites Attack Niken Subekti..............................................................................................................................................................

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Combining Ability of Yield Component in Chili (Capsicum annuum) Deviona, Muhamad Syukur, Aslim Rasyad, Elza Zuhry, Arip Hidayatullah.............................................................

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Analysis of Shallot-Farming Risk & Food Security of Farm- Household in Bantul Regency, Yogyakarta Province Any Suryantini, Slamet Hartono, Cungki Kusdarjito.................................................................................................

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Trichoderma virens isolated from Cocoa plantation in Aceh increases viability and vigor of expired seed Rina Sriwati , Hasanuddin, Zwina Savitri, Takeuchi, Y.............................................................................................

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Proceeding of SustaiN 2013 ISSN: 2188-0999 Sustainable Forestry and Agriculture 4th International Conference on Sustainable Future for Human Security, SustaiN 2013

Prospect of School Milk Program in Rural Indonesia: Case study at Bantul Regency, Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta Province Sudi Nurtinia,*, Mujtahidah Anggriani Ummul Muzayyanaha a

Faculty of Animal Science, Gadjah Mada university, Jl. Fauna 3 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia

Abstract This study is to analyse the implementation of School Milk Program (SMP) for elementary school pupils of fourth and fifth grade at Argosari Muhamadiyah Elementary School, Bantul Regency, Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta Province (DIY Province). The extension and discussion to the teachers, pupils and their parents on milk especially fresh milk (pasteurized milk) about milk content, the advantage for human beings and the milk production process from farmer was part of the program. It was accomplished by a special educational trip for the pupils to the dairy farm in Faculty of Animal Science, Gadjah Mada University in order to get deep comprehension about milk, where it comes from and how it processed. Furthermore, they were also asked to draw what they saw in the trip and it is to be hoped that their knowledge on milk would give more impression in their mind that would make them more milk minded. In this SMP, the pupils can get the milk by saving some of their pocket money every day. The results showed that most of the parents (61.29 %) and 62.50 % of the pupils want to save 500 IDR per day, even 22.58 % parents and 34.37 % pupils want to save of 1,000 IDR per day and the remainder wants to save less than 500 IDR per day for buying pasteurized milk. It can be concluded that either parents or pupils are able to save 500 IDR per day to buy fresh milk (pasteurized milk). About 62 % of the parents wanted the SMP and also drinking milk together (for pupils) were held once a week in the school. With this way the school would be able to hold the routine agenda of drinking milk together. It was also hoped the pupils in the rural areas could keep drinking fresh milk (pasteurized milk) routinely of their own free will and not depending on the milk aid program, since they had been the milk minded. © 2013 The Authors. Published by SustaiN Society. Selection and peer-review under responsibility ofthe SustaiN conference committee and supported by Kyoto University; (RISH), (OPIR), (GCOE-ARS) and (GSS) as co-hosts. Keywords: Scholl Milk Program; rural Area; elementary school pupils.

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1.

Introduction

Milk has many nutrients that children need to grow and develop strong bones. The kind of milk consumed by Indonesian people at the present time is different from those consumed by developed countries. The Indonesian people drink so little amount of liquid milk compared to those of other countries. In 2007, the amount of liquid milk consumed in Indonesia was only 18 %, while in Europe almost 100 %, The United States 99.7 %, India 98 %, Thailand 88 %, and China 76.5 % [4]. According to [5], the total consumption of milk by Indonesian people in 2007 was 7.3 litter/person/year [3]. Milk drinking tradition of the Indonesian people has to be changed gradually. To get used to drink liquid milk or pasteurized milk can be commenced with the school milk program for school pupils. The school milk program had ever been carried out at several areas in Indonesia such as in Sukabumi, Semarang and West Bandung. The Government of Sinjai Distric had brought a milk program to the school pupils by an additional menu program. If the program of providing milk to the school pupils will soon be able to be fulfilled and become a national program, it is hoped to give double benefits. First, with the increase consumption of milk, it would improve human resources, so it would be an effective means to prevent a “lost generation”. Second, it would decrease the dependency of marketing milk to The Milk Processing Industry (MPI) and the farmer would have a stronger bargaining position not only as a price taker but also in turn they could enhance their income. Drinking fresh milk is the best choice to get the best benefits from a glass of milk. Although processed milk has been added some nutrients, fresh milk has perfect milk nutrient content and provides good benefits for the body. Feeding program for school children in Indonesia is far behind compared to other countries. In 1940, The US started to *

Corresponding author. Tel.: +62-274-513363; fax: +62-274-521578 E-mail address: [email protected]

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Proceeding of SustaiN 2013 ISSN: 2188-0999 Sustainable Forestry and Agriculture develop National School Lunch Program and officially continued the program since 1969. This program has been successful to increase the milk consumption of children and its impact to children’s intelligence and health conditions [2]. The government of Thailand supported School Milk Program for children by giving them fresh milk at school. This program utilized 33% fresh milk production in the country. This program significantly impacted the increased milk consumption and the revenue of dairy farmers [1]. Thailand started dairy development since 1960 and was successfully increasing national milk consumption through school milk program, which was launched since 1983. Nowadays every year in 260 days more than 6 million children in schools drink milk [7]. As [6] mentioned, the milk program for school children has been contributed to the national milk consumption up to 50%. The program started with powder milk and gradually changed into fresh milk from the country’s production. Milk for children at school has been also implemented in Indonesia. The [4] concern was to encourage medium milk processing industry (MPI) to produce milk for supporting milk for children at school program. The medium-scale MPI got guaranty in the sustainability of fresh milk supply and milk marketing network by a captive market in particular period, such as through the milk program for school children. Thus, there was interdependency between on-farm activities and the milk handling, processing, distribution and marketing to consumer. Drinking fresh milk has other benefits such as the price aspect. So far, people think that milk is expensive food. They obviously bought processed milk such as Ultra High Temperature (UHT) milk, which has a luxury package and a high price. But this does not apply to fresh milk. Fresh milk is certainly more affordable since there is no need to process in manufacturing. In an economic calculation, the price of milk powder is double the price of fresh milk from farmers. By a more affordable price of milk, it can be consumed by people of every income level (low to high income class). It will enforce the habit on consuming milk and will increase national milk consumption. The implementation of SMP can help the children practice what they learn in their classroom about healthy eating and the impact of drinking milk for their body, brain, and health 2.

Materials and Methods

The materials of this study are elementary school pupils of fourth and fifth grades at Argosari Muhamadiyah School, at Sedayu, Bantul, in DIY Province together with their parents. Providing extension and discussion to the teachers, pupils and their parents on milk especially pasteurized milk about its ingredients and the advantage for human being and how to get the milk. It was accomplished by a special educational trip for the pupils to the Faculty of Animal Science GMU in order to get more comprehension about milk, where did it come from, how was it processed. Furthermore, they were also asked to draw what they saw in the trip and it is to be hoped that their knowledge on milk would give more impression in their mind that would make them more milk minded. On the occasion, there was an agenda of drinking milk together.

ORGANIZER

OUTCOME

PROCESS

4th and 5th grade elementary school

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pupils

Local government (Food securityAgency)

Extensio

Change in Milk

n

perception

Perception of

Department of Socio-Economics of

milk

ral

livestock Faculty of

Field trip to

Animal Science

dairy

GMU

Behaviou

Figure 1. Schema of the farming School Milk Program agenda

change Regular Drinking milk

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Proceeding of SustaiN 2013 ISSN: 2188-0999 Sustainable Forestry and Agriculture 3.

Result and discussion

The school Milk Program had much been performed in Indonesia, but it was usually by giving milk free to the people for several times, therefore if the program finished, the milk drinking also stopped. With the program of the Faculty of Animal Science GMU, the pupils were asked together to save parts of their pocket money every day, so if they had been saving the money they would be able to buy milk. With this way, the school would be able to hold the routine agenda of drinking milk together, on the other hand pupils could also drink pasteurized milk routinely. It was also hoped the pupils in the rural area could keep drinking pasteurized milk routinely on their own free will and not depending on the milk aid program, since they had been the milk minded. The rsults of the study showed that the average of pupils brought pocket money of 2,000 IDR every day. The price of fresh milk/pasteurized milk was 2,000 IDR per cup. From the data collected most of the parents (61.29 %) and 62.50 % of the pupils want to save of 500 IDR per day to buy fresh milk (pasteurized milk) even 22.58 % parents and 34.37 % pupils want to save of 1,000 IDR per day and the remainder wants to save less than 500 IDR. It can be concluded that either parents or pupils are able to save 500 IDR per day to buy fresh milk (pasteurized milk). Also 62.29 % of the parents want the program of drinking milk together to be held once a week in the school. On the other hand, the program of drinking milk together can be held once a week. With the above data, we can analyse the implementation of SMP in the rural area through SWOT analysis as follow: Strength

Weakness

1. There is a will from the pupils to drink milk together at school. 2. The willingness of pupils to save their pocket money for buying milk at school and support by the parents.

1. Most of the people consume milk in the form of milk powder and condensed milk. 2. Most of the people consider that milk is only for baby.

Opportunity

Threat

1. Availability of fresh/ pasteurized milk supplier. 2. Availability of facility to keep fresh /pasteurized milk. 3. Availability of extension service for pupils to explain the advantage of fresh milk (pasteurized milk)

1. Low accessibility of fresh/pasteurized milk in the rural area. 2. Fresh/pasteurized milk (ready to drink) storage not available at school.

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Figure 2. SWOT analysis

Based on a SWOT analysis (Table 1), it is shown that drinking milk in school will continue and it is sustainable because they realized that the milk is good for their health. Pupils in Muhammadiyah Argosari elementary school bought 450 cups of fresh milk (pasteurized milk) per week, which means every student drinking two cups of milk per week in school. Although the program is officially finished, they are still routinely drink milk. The supplier reported that Muhammadiyah Argosar I Elementary School regularly buy fresh/pasteurized milk. The School Milk Program will be successful and sustainable if organizers set up and pay attention to the necessary facilities and infrastructures. Not merely providing help by offering free milk and then the program just stopped and left without any evaluation. If SMP with this method would be held nationally to all primary school children in addition to the increase milk consumption in Indonesia, it would also change the kind of milk consumption of Indonesian people namely from powder or condensed milk to liquid milk or pasteurized milk. And it can help dairy farmers in marketing of fresh milk. So far, the marketing of fresh milk from farmer is 92% to MPI which it tends to be monopsony-market-structure and farmer is price taker. When demand of pasteurized milk increases, there would be another alternative fresh milk market instead of MPI, since pasteurized milk processing can be done by the industry of middle scale than factory industry. Therefore, the fresh milk market is more competitive and there is an increase in the bargaining power of the farmer. 4.

Conclusion

All of the pupils and teachers in Muhammadiyah Argosari Elementary School have been participated during SMP. All of the pupils joined to save their pocket money for buying milk at schooll but the number varies. With this way the

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Proceeding of SustaiN 2013 ISSN: 2188-0999 Sustainable Forestry and Agriculture school would be able to hold the routine agenda of drinking milk together or the SMP in this area successfully and sustainably. SMP will become successful and sustainable if the program organizer pays attention to the facilities and infrastructures. Further program and policy should be realized that the strength, the weakness, the opportunity and the threat of the people are main drivers to make a sustainable school milk program (not only by government aid). With a continuous success of SMP, the issue of sustainable future for human security is supported through the increase of milk consumption and the welfare of dairy farmers. Acknowledgements We must express our deepest appreciation to the Faculty of Animal Science, Gadjah Mada University for funding the program, Department of Socio-Economics of Livestock and all teachers and pupils at Muhammadiyah Argosari Elementary School, Sedayu, Bantul, DIY Province, Indonesia, for the help and support during the program. References

2.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Aiumlamai, S. FTA (Free Trade Area) and Research Priorities for The Dairy Industry in Thailand. AHAT/BSAS International Conference. November 14-18, 2005, KhonKaen, Thailand; 2005. Boediyana,T. Pengembangan Pasar SSDN Melalui PMTAS dan Gerimis Bagus/Sekawan. Seminar Pengembangan Pengolahan dan Kerjasama Pemasaran Persusuan Nasional Yang Berkelanjutan Dalam Upaya Peningkatan Produksi dan Konsumsi Susu Segar Dalam Negeri. Lembang, Bandung; 2010. BPS. Statistical Yearbook of Indonesia. Centre for Indonesia Statistical Board; 2012. Direktorat Jendral Industri Agro dan Kimia (Director General of Agro-industry and Chemistry). Kebijakan Model Pengembangan Industri Pengolahan Susu. Direktorat Jendral Industri Agro dan Kimia. Departemen Perindustrian Republik Indonesia. FAO. Dairy Trade: Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative (PPLPI). Available at: http://www.fao.org/ag/pplpi.html. (Accession date: March, 25, 2011; 2011. Opatpatanakit, Y. Animal Production in Thailand: Challenges and Potentials in Global Market. Community Empowerment and Tropical Animal Production. Proceeding of the 5th ISTAP, Part 1. October 19-22, 2010. Yogyakarta, Indonesia; 2010. Viriyapak, C. Opening Speech by Deputy Director General Department of Livestock Development Thailand. Dairy Expert Roundtable Meeting, December 8- 9, 2010. MuakLek, Thailand; 2010.

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