Sustainability Report FY - EcoCampus

NTU’s 2015 Sustainability Report transcribes our ... (STARS), a set of reporting standards developed by the Association for the Advancement of Sustain...

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Sustainability Report

© Nanyang Technological University

FY

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

About this report

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Message from our President

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Key highlights

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About Nanyang Technological University

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Sustainability at NTU

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Resource use and emissions

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Campus operations

30

Sustainability education and research

36

Community engagement

44

GRI index

58

NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

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About this Report

In keeping with our ambition to become the world’s greenest campus in the coming years, NTU Singapore is pleased to present our stakeholders with the 2015 Sustainability Report. For us at NTU, the release of this publication marks an important milestone in our sustainability journey, as not only is this our first sustainability report, but we are also the first university in Singapore to accomplish such an undertaking. We hope to release a sustainability report every year. NTU’s 2015 Sustainability Report transcribes our University’s sustainability efforts over the financial year from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016. This year, we have grown further with the opening of our Novena Campus, the Hive (a state-of-the-art learning hub) and two new buildings for the School of Medicine. Most of the data reported in this report is for the NTU main campus and inclusion of data for other campuses shall be sought for future reports. For our inaugural report, we have chosen to report in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) ‘Core’ option. This report communicates our policies, practices, performance and targets in four key areas that are material to NTU. These aspects are detailed in the materiality assessment section. While some

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

sections of the report are based on the GRI G4 guidelines, we felt that the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS), a set of reporting standards developed by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE), offered a more appropriate framework for us to report on material issues more specific to our university life, such as education and research. Although this report has not been externally assured, we will look to do this for future sustainability reports. NTU is also in the continuous process of evaluating our data collection processes on the basis of their accuracy, impartiality and transparency and look forward to sharing more of our sustainability journey with our stakeholders. A soft copy of the report can be downloaded from the NTU website (www.ntu. edu.sg/AboutNTU/pages/sustainabilityreport. aspx). Any queries or comments regarding our sustainability report can be addressed to Regula von Büren ([email protected]). Our stakeholders are also advised to read NTU’s Annual Report 2015, NTU At a Glance 2015 and Sustainable Earth Peak Year 5 for a complete view of the University’s strategy, performance and prospects.

Message from our President

I am delighted to present NTU’s inaugural Sustainability Report. NTU is a global university on a rapid rise. Ranked 13th in the world according to Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) university ranking 2015/16, it is also the world’s top young elite university. Our international reputation and standing has enabled us to attract the best and brightest students. As a small island, Singapore is facing challenges like limited alternative energy options, limited local resources and transboundary issues like haze. We at NTU prepare our students to be global citizens of the world and aspire to carry out research that will improve our lives, environment and benefit humanity as well its ecosystem. We have identified sustainable earth as one of its five major research thrusts. Sustainable Earth was already an integral part of NTU’s five year strategic plan 2015 and continues to be the major focus of the current strategic plan 2020. Our vision is “Sustainapore, Greenest Campus in the world!”. We want to nurture leaders and develop and implement innovative solutions to address some of the major sustainability challenges facing Singapore and other cities in the world. The ambitious nature of our vision can provide a speedy boost to NTU’s sustainability efforts. Our goal to reduce energy intensity by 35% until 2020 contributes to Singapore’s intention to reduce its emissions intensity by 36% by 2030 (as submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Secretariat). In FY15/16, NTU has managed to accomplish some impressive achievements. We recently received the first Green Mark PlatinumStar Champion Award by Singapore’s Building and Construction Authority (BCA) for all our efforts done up to date – the highest accolade in Singapore for outstanding commitment to sustainable building design. We have continuing

Professor Bertil Andersson President Nanyang Technological University

success in securing competitive grants of which more than a third is dedicated for sustainability research projects. NTU’s mandatory sustainability course provides all students with a basic understanding of the current environmental, social and economic challenges and solutions facing Singapore and the world. Awards like the Excellence in Integration Award by the International Sustainable Campus Network (ISCN) are a motivating recognition of our efforts. NTU aims to tackle complex sustainability issues like clean energy, climate change or urbanisation with an integrated approach which includes participation from all colleges, schools, institutes and centres within NTU. Furthermore, industry collaborations are a cornerstone for NTU to foster sustainable development through the successful commercialisation of projects from R&D to real life applications. As part of the EcoCampus Initiative, NTU’s 200-hectare campus and adjacent 50-hectare CleanTech Park are being transformed into a super test-bed for research projects in cutting-edge green, clean and smart technologies. Collaborations with university networks like ISCN and the Global Alliance of Technological Universities have strengthened our sustainability efforts further. Our first NTU sustainability report (which is in accordance with the GRI) will support us in having a better overview of our activities and shape our future plans and actions. As the report indicates, NTU focuses on the four areas of resource use and emissions, campus operations, sustainable education and research and community engagement. The overall performance data indicates that we are on our way to reach most of our goals – for example to achieve 35% reduction in energy intensity. To achieve our ambitious goals, strategic focus is required for the next few years. This aligns with our strategic plan NTU 2020. I am confident that we will reach our goals and make our vision a reality. NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

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Key highlights Reduced energy intensity per sqm by 7% since 2011

Reduced waste intensity per capita by 21% since 2011

Trial of driverless electric shuttle bus service for NTU employees and students in FY15

Largest solar panel installation in Singapore

18 Green Mark Platinum buildings as of 31 March 2016

Winner of the FY15 Singapore Environmental Achievement Award

283 IPs and patents related to sustainability and 24 start-ups as of 31 March 2016

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Sustainability awards   April 2015 BCA Universal Design Mark Award 8 BCA Green Mark Platinum Awards   June 2015 Excellence in Integration Award, ISCN Sustainable Campus Excellence Award   August 2015 Singapore Environment Council – Singapore Environmental Achievement Award   January 2016 South West ECo Award

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About Nanyang Technological University

Young and research-intensive, Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) is ranked 13th globally. It is also placed 1st amongst the world’s best young universities. The university has colleges of Engineering, Business, Science, Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, and an Interdisciplinary Graduate School. It also has a medical school, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, set up jointly with Imperial College London. NTU is also home to world-class autonomous entities such as the National Institute of Education, S Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Earth Observatory of Singapore, and Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering. In accordance with our well-designed curriculum backed by strong industry partnerships, we provide outstanding education to approximately 33,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students, which include medal winning Olympiads and highperforming scholars. We have over 4,547 faculty and researchers from 85 countries who enrich the NTU community with a range of cross-border perspectives and offer in-depth expertise across a variety of disciplines. Research in NTU is carried out within and across the colleges/ schools and Research Centres of Excellence (RCEs). They are supported by 8 university-level research institutes with 15 research centres under the institutes, 2 National Research Foundation (NRF) Corporate Labs, 60 research centres under the colleges/schools, and 24 joint centres with external organisations. NTU spearheads research into sustainability through the Energy Research Institute @ NTU ([email protected]), Nanyang Environment & Water Research Institute (NEWRI), Sustainable Earth Office (SEO) and EcoCampus Initiative. All activities are coordinated by Sustainable Earth Office (SEO).

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Photo Credit: Hufton and Crow

Memberships NTU is a member, signatory or participant of many national and international multi-stakeholder initiatives. These initiatives enable us to leverage our influence and drive collective action on sustainability. Engaging in partnerships is an important way to share our knowledge and expertise and learn from others as well. Some of the memberships we are active in are: • • • • • •

International Sustainable Campus Network (ISCN) Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) Global Alliance of Technological Universities (GlobalTech) Global Compact Network Singapore (GCNS) Sustainable Energy Association of Singapore (SEAS) Alliance for Research on Corporate Sustainability (ARCS)

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Our NTU community

NTU has a Code of Conduct that expresses our commitment to the ethical, professional and legal standards we use as the basis for our decisions and dealings inside and outside the University. The University Cabinet is responsible for upholding the Code of Conduct. Members of the University community are also individually and collectively responsible for upholding this Code. The Code of Conduct can be found on our NTU website and all our employees are expected to uphold the Code. New employees are asked to read the Code during orientation.

NTU is driven by a team of 7,307 faculty, research, management and support staff. All our employees are employed under a permanent or temporary contract. NTU schools, research centres or departments may hire temporary (hourly paid) staff. These numbers are not captured in the NTU database. In future reports, NTU aims to report on these numbers as well. All eligible employees who are bargainables are covered by the Collective Agreement with the union. These comprise 17% of the total employee population of NTU.

100% 80%

444

999

60% 40%

1216

Faculty1

1125

438

528

Management

Support

1888

20% 0%

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Research Male

Female

Figure 1. Total number of employees2 1. Includes visiting faculty (115 in total, 101 males and 14 females). NTU also works with adjunct faculty who are not included in the figures above (303 in total, 239 males, 64 females). 2. Total number of employees represent employees under permanent contracts. NTU defines permanent employees as employees that do not work on hourly rates. These employees may be under term contracts.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

As at 31 July 2015, NTU had 33,166 students. 10000

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Figure 3. Graduate Students Population by Gender

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Figure 5. Higher Degree Graduate Output by Gender

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Sustainability @ NTU

Our vision and mission goes beyond the norm of sustainability

Vision: Sustainapore, Greenest Campus in the world!

Mission: To nurture leaders, develop and implement innovative solutions to address some of the major sustainability challenges facing Singapore and other cities in the world.

Sustainability is one of the core values of NTU. NTU aspires to be the most sustainable university in the world, an ambition based on the grand challenges of the world and our objective to distinguish ourselves academically. Our five-year strategic blueprint (NTU 2015) labelled Sustainable Earth Peak as our “peak of peaks” amongst our Five Peaks of Excellence, and this has been further reinforced in our latest five-year strategic blueprint, NTU 2020. Throughout the past few years, NTU has leveraged our collection of academic expertise, our high-tech facilities and our strong ties with industry to lead the way in the development and implementation of a diverse range of sustainability initiatives in Singapore. We have dedicated ourselves to the idea of a “living laboratory” on campus, and have set bold targets for our performance. Governance structure for sustainability In 2011, NTU formalized the governance of sustainability with the launch of Sustainable Earth @ NTU ([email protected]). The Sustainable Earth Office (SEO) aspires to make sustainability sustainable at NTU. Sustainability in research, education, collaborative projects, commercialisation, and outreach will thrive and endure if undertaken voluntarily by coalitions of the willing, enthusiastic, and most capable within a supportive administrative and departmental environment. The SEO encourages collaboration between NTU’s departments, divisions and offices and creates a sense of unity towards NTU’s sustainability goals. Our campus operations are managed by the Office of Development and Facilities Management (ODFM) and the Office of Housing and Auxiliary Services (HAS). The ODFM oversees all new development, operation and maintenance of the University’s facilities and grounds and is committed to creates a green & sustainable environment, conducive for life-long learning and creativity. The HAS manages NTU’s residential and auxiliary services.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

NTU’s interdisciplinary research institutions such as [email protected], NEWRI and Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) contribute to NTU’s sustainability efforts through ground-breaking research and industry collaborations that bring new technology and ideas to life. These institutions play a big role in establishing NTU as a leading university that is committed to sustainability. At the heart of NTU’s sustainability ambition is the EcoCampus initiative, which was launched in 2014 to develop a novel campuswide sustainability framework. EcoCampus aims to be the leading example for high impact energy efficiency and sustainability for urban developments in Singapore. Led by the NTU Provost, the EcoCampus Steering Committee provides strategic oversight for the initiative. It also provides guidance to establish the development of the requisite organisational structure and framework in alignment with the programme’s overall mission, objectives and targets. The Steering Committee’s members also include senior management representatives from several public agencies in Singapore. Aiding the Steering Committee is the EcoCampus technical review committee, which provides technological and policy-related perspectives that can enable holistic decision making.

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NTU also has an informal network of student and staff groups that help to promote the sustainability agenda in NTU. Sustainability Officers are Management and Support staff members who serve as contact points within the individual schools and facilitate the conveyance of key sustainability information to our students and employees. Earthlink is a student-led group that aims to increase the NTU community’s awareness on environmental issues. They do this by creating opportunities for the NTU community to make a positive difference for the environment and are proactive in organising events and campaigns to engage the NTU community.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Materiality assessment NTU carried out a materiality assessment to determine the aspects which are material to us and our stakeholders. We utilised the GRI G4 Reporting Framework and STARS guidelines, which is specifically for universities, as well as the International Sustainable Campus Network/Global University Leaders Forum Sustainable Campus Charter to develop a global list of material topics. We also benchmarked ourselves against other leading universities to identify other aspects that they address in their reports. A workshop was organised in mid-February 2015 at NTU using this collection of topics as a base. Major stakeholders were invited to evaluate the relative importance (low, medium or high) of each topic from both the Stakeholder (external) and the Business or Strategic Impacts (internal) viewpoints. The Stakeholder view reflects the view of major stakeholders, such as students, faculty and staff, donors and funding agencies, business and industrial partners, the community where NTU operates and others with a vested interest in NTU and our success. The Business or Strategic Impacts view refers to the impact of a topic on NTU’s capability to fulfil our key objectives, namely supporting research and providing education. Aspects that were deemed highly important from both viewpoints were considered to be “material” and incorporated into our sustainability roadmap development and our reporting processes. Those that have low importance from both perspectives are initially considered to be immaterial. Those that were important from only one perspective were evaluated and, depending on how organisations generally report on sustainability-associated topics, either included or excluded.

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Table 1: An overview of the material aspects identified which are applicable for NTU’s operations  Strategic sustainability pillar

Material aspects

Impact within organisation

Impact outside organisation

Green campus ­‑ resource use

• GHG emissions • Energy • Water • Waste

• All operations

• Business community government suppliers

Green campus ­‑ campus operations

• Transportation • Procurement • Green buildings

• All operations

• Business community government suppliers

Sustainable curriculum

• Education programmes • Research programmes

• All operations

• Business community government

Community engagement

• Internal: student, faculty and staff engagement

• All operations

• Local community

• External: local community engagement

Stakeholder engagement NTU’s sustainability strategy was developed after a series of comprehensive surveys. A thorough landscape assessment of major higher education institutions worldwide was first conducted. Subsequently, a materiality assessment whereby stakeholders were consulted to identify the issues most pertinent to NTU and our stakeholders was carried out. Finally, a collection of strategic foci and related criteria for us to track our sustainability performance were selected. Based on interviews with senior management, key stakeholders for NTU were determined. In the years to come, NTU will continue to strive to enhance our engagement with stakeholders through improving communication channels and embedding stakeholder input into our strategy.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Stakeholder group

Engagement goals

Frequency of engagement

Means of engagement

Concerns raised

Students

We hope to provide a conducive learning environment and improve student satisfaction, while grooming a new generation of leaders who understand sustainability issues.

Annual, as required

Student Experience Survey, workshops, events, orientation programmes

Degree Programme, Campus Facilities, Campus Life, Teaching etc

Faculty and staff

We hope to recruit and retain talented employees by improving job satisfaction, and generate value for NTU by supporting research projects.

Regular basis, at least once a month

Newsletters, Update from President’s Office, Notice boards/digital displays

Office comfort, safety

Business community

We hope to deepen industry collaboration to foster learning and innovation.

As required

Industry workshops, meetings, campus/ lab tours

Collaboration opportunities, funding, research IP, recruitement

Board of trustees

We hope to improve governance at the university and develop roadmaps for the future.

At least 4 times a year, as required

Board meetings, sub committee meetings, retreat, informal meetings

Overall development of NTU (driving for international distinction as a university of science and technology), Finance

Government

We hope to align NTU’s sustainability strategy with national goals.

As required

Workshops, meetings

Collaboration opportunities, funding, R&D roadmap, curriculum

Suppliers

We hope to source quality products from sustainable suppliers.

As required

Limited engagement through official protocols, e.g. tenders

Business opportunity, commercial aspects

Affiliated universities / institutes

We hope to strengthen partnerships and leverage expertise to enhance the quality of our programmes.

As required

Research Partnerships, joint phd/mastersprogramms, workshops, conferences

Collaboration opportunities, exchange opportunities

Residents

We hope to enhance the well-being of residents on campus while decreasing resource consumption and wastage.

Throughout the semester, as required

Survey, email communication

Living conditions, rental fees, transport arrangements, food & beverage

Parent community

We hope to improve parental satisfaction with our programmes.

Annual, as required

Open house, website, media articles, NTU fest

Rankings, donations, tuition fees, quality of education

Local community

We hope to improve the well-being of the local community to cultivate social consciousness in students and employees.

Annual, as required

Open house, website, media articles, NTU fest, tours

Safety/noise, rental opportunities, community engagement

Alumni

We hope to foster life-long relationships that creates value for NTU and our alumni.

Annual, as required

Newsletter, engagement activities like tours, events, workshops, seminars

Rankings, giving back, networking

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Resource use & emissions NTU is committed to reducing our consumption of natural resources and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Our aim is to maintain a campus that fosters a resource and energy conservation culture that utilises innovative technologies. We have identified our key material topics in this area as being: Energy, GHG emissions, Water and Waste. The earth has finite resources and we recognize that we have a role to play in protecting the environment for future generations. NTU proactively seeks new ways to reduce our resource consumption and collaborates with industry experts to try and achieve our goals.

Our 2020 goals

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35%

35%

35%

35%

Reduction in energy intensity (per sqm)

Reduction in GHG emissions intensity (Scope 2 only)

Reduction in water consumption intensity (per sqm)

Reduction in waste intensity (per capita)

NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Table 2: FY15 carbon emissions

41,405

Scope 2

91,890,181

Scope 3

15,826,928

0.7

760

0.6

740

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Scope 1

780

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Figure 7. Energy intensity per square metre

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Figure 6. Total energy consumption

Energy intensity (GJ/per capita)

kg CO2e

*Note: 18 flights to Singapore (From Overseas) has been excluded. Air travel distance is taken into consideration as round trips. Data excludes travel by LKCMedicine, RSIS and NTUitive.

Performance

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Figure 8. Energy intensity per capita

Emissions intensity (kgCO2e/per capita)

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Figure 9. Emissions intensity per square metre

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NTU Academic Building Auxiliary and Common Services Employee, Student and commercial residences National Institute of Education Commercial

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Figure 10. Emissions intensity per capita

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Figure 11. Breakdown of energy consumption by building type for FY15

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Energy & emissions The management of energy reduction, efficiency and renewable energy sources forms an important and conspicuous component of NTU’s sustainability programme. We are committed to achieving our target to reduce our energy intensity and emissions intensity by 35% by 2020 and have undertaken several measures such as collaborating with industry partners to test-bed new energy efficiency technology and continuously updating our older facilities and buildings. We also ensure that all our new buildings are as energy-efficient as possible and commit to the highest green building standards. Performance In FY15, NTU consumed a total of 766,944 GJ of energy. Although absolute consumption has increased, the energy intensity ratio per square metre has actually decreased by 7% since FY11. This means that eventhough our gross floor area increased by over 58,000m2 since FY14, we have been able to reduce the amount of energy consumed per square metre. Further analysis of our data has shown that more than 80% of the energy consumed on campus was by the academic and auxiliary buildings as well as the residences. NTU is committed to reducing energy consumption wherever possible and has implemented numerous energy conservation initiatives over the years. Some of these include the adoption of high efficient chiller plant systems, installing motion sensors for common areas, replacing existing lighting to LEDs and installing electronic air cleaners to improve AHU efficiency. The newly implemented in-line pumping for domestic water transportation eliminates the need for transfer tanks and reduces the transfer pump size by 80% for all buildings in NTU. We will continue to focus our efforts in reducing our energy intensity to achieve our target.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Emissions Total Scope 1 and 2 emissions were 91,932 tCO2e for FY15. This included emissions from NTU’s internal shuttle bus as well as purchased electricity. Scope 3 emissions was 15,827 tCO2e and comprised of air travel by our staff and faculty. We have yet to fully encompass all our emissions sources into our calculations. We hope to do so in the future. Renewable energy NTU has recently completed the installation of a 5 MW Solar Photovoltaic (PV) system on campus. The PV modules are placed on the rooftops of 32 buildings across the campus and is the largest solar PV installation at any single location in Singapore to date. It is estimated that the PV system will reduce the campus reliance on grid power by approximately 3% of the current total campus consumption and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 3,000 tons of CO2 a year. It will also save NTU approximately $1.5 million in electricity costs annually. The installation puts NTU on the same playing field as some of the top universities tracked by AASHE in terms of total installed capacity and largest roof top mounted solar PV system. In 2016, NTU plans to carry out a wide-ranging investigation into other energy efficiency opportunities, aiding it in planning and target-setting.

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A living laboratory NTU is a living laboratory for cutting-edge energy efficiency technologies. As part of our efforts towards this goal, we are working with industry partners to test-bed new energy efficiency technology that can be used across our campus to help reduce our energy consumption. We have numerous ongoing projects on campus and some of the projects are demonstrating a high potential for substantial energy savings. These include:

Industry collaborator: Siemens What: Intelligent, Demand Based, Algorithmic Chiller Optimization. This system automatically adjusts the chiller load to a state of dynamic balance, which reduces overall power consumption. The system is being tested in the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Period: September 2014 – July 2017 Estimated savings: 10 - 20% energy reduction

Industry collaborator: 3M / AlfaTech What: Liquid Immersion Cooling for Data Centers. Using a 2-phase system, electronic components are submerged into a bath of dielectric heat transfer liquids, which are much better heat conductors than air, water or oil. This eliminates the need for conventional cooling hardware and results in better cooling efficiency. Compared to traditional air, water or oil cooling, this passive process results in the use of much less energy. Period: March 2015 – February 2017 Estimated savings: 35% energy reduction

Industry collaborator: JouleAir What: Demand Control Ventilation System. DCV is a centralised control system which uses measuring devices like TVOC, particulates, CO, CO2 and dew point temperature sensors to modulate the volume of air supply into the spaces during occupied and unoccupied periods. It has been installed in the common facilities and laboratories of the School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. Period: December 2014 – April 2017 Estimated savings: 15-25% energy reduction

Industry collaborator: ENGIE Lab Singapore What: The PowerZee app was designed by ENGIE Lab Singapore in partnership with NTU as a fun tool to engage everyone in increasing the energy efficiency of the campus. By developing a smartphone virtual experience, the PowerZee app brought together campus users to do their bit in reducing everyday electricity consumption. Period: Ongoing since February 2015 Estimated savings: 5-10% energy reduction

Industry collaborator: Murata What: Smart Energy Management Systems. Improved grid stability and self-sufficiency with the system operating autonomously by deciding how to distribute grid power and electricity from solar PV or storage batteries to household appliances, and controls energy allocation accordingly. Period: September 2014 – September 2017 Estimated savings: 35% energy reduction 22

NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Casestudy: Passive Displacement Ventilation (PDV)

Cooling coils Warm Air Chilled Water

Cool air

In Singapore, the conventional air-conditioning system uses fan coil units, or air handling units where treated outdoor air is supplied into conditioned spaces after blowing it over coils that run chilled water for cooling. The system components such as fans, duct works, terminal units or diffusers and related fittings are the main contributors to capital and operating costs. Air-conditioning is the single biggest energy consumer in most buildings in Singapore, often accounting for more than 60% of the total energy consumed. The other issues associated with traditional air distribution systems is that they can be noisy and lead to localised areas of overcooling especially near the overhead terminal units where the air blows directly on the person, causing a lot of discomfort. Passive displacement ventilation (PDV) system is an air-conditioning concept that relies on the fundamentals of natural convection to drive the conditioned air to the occupants. Without the mechanical fan, the air travels at lower velocity and more naturally due to the buoyancy effect of air, in which hot air rises while cold air sinks. In the PDV system, cold air is introduced at the floor level and the warm air is extracted at the ceiling level. The treated air flows through a cavity created using a small vertical partition next to the wall that has cooling coils on the top.

PDV systems have significant financial benefits compared to conventional air-conditioning systems. These include cost savings from the reduction of construction materials required like ductwork and accessories as well as reduced operating costs and servicing costs on the mechanical components and more. PDV systems are also quieter than conventional overhead systems and have better ventilation efficiency, which enhances indoor air quality and provides a more desirable acoustic environment. PDVs are also more appropriate for spaces where high ventilation is required, such as classrooms, conference rooms and offices. The PDV system was first tested at a few tutorial rooms on the campus. There were also scientific studies done to understand the air flow patterns and the temperature distribution. With a positive user experience and knowledge from the tests, the PDV implementation was scaled-up to the whole building level at The Hive Building, which included 55 tutorial rooms. The operational electricity savings due to improved ventilation efficiency are estimated to be more than $1 million over a period of five years of operation. The Hive building has been operational since September 2015 and the PDV system there has been running smoothly ever since.

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Rain Garden

Outdoor Seating Deck

Sedimentation Basin d lan sh ar M & g in ad sc Ca

Cleansing Biotope

s am re St

Recreation Pond

49.2% of site area treated by ABC stormwater management

Water NTU is highly cognizant of the importance of water, especially in Singapore. We are committed to supporting Singapore’s efforts in conserving water by reducing our consumption and treating and recycling water effectively. NTU is an active supporter of the Active, Beautiful, Clean Waters (ABC) Programme that was launched in 2006 by Singapore’s National Water Agency, PUB. Through this programme, all developers are encouraged to implement environmentally sustainable green features or ABC Waters design features in their developments. NTU recently designed a natural stormwater runoff treatment system within its new Crescent and Pioneer residential halls, which involved diverting stormwater runoff from the upstream catchment and creating a natural water body. A full treatment train of ABC Waters design features consisting of a sedimentation basin, linear wetlands, bioretention basins and cleansing biotope was integrated with the natural water body to cleanse the stormwater runoff before discharging the clean water into a landscaped cascading pond. The pond also helps to improve the aesthetics and provide a calming environment for our students. 24

NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

NTU also has a rainwater collection system that has been integrated into the design of our School of Art, Design and Media. The building has a sloping green roof that is not only an aesthetic feature, but also creates open space, insulates the building, cools the surrounding air and harvests rainwater for landscaping irrigation. Under the grass roof are four layers of interrelated matter which include crushed volcanic rocks, pumice and washed sand (for the grass to root), as well as a moisture retention mat. The turfgrass remains green and healthy year round via an automatic sprinkler system using harvested rainwater. There are also rain sensors installed on the green roof to automate the irrigation process whereby irrigation is ceased when it rains. This system, along with the other green features of the building, has saved more than 1,170m3 of water a year (equivalent to the average water consumption of five 4-room HDB flats a year), leading to lower operation and maintenance costs. Greywater recycling is also practised at one of our student residential halls where all greywater from showers and wash basins is treated on-site and re-used for flushing toilets.

Performance In FY15, NTU consumed 1.67 million cubic metres of water. Water intensity per square metre has decreased by 3% since FY11, although on a per capita basis, it has increased by 5%. More than 40% of water was consumed by our academic buildings, with half of that being used for cooling towers. The next two largest consumers of water were the student residences and commercial areas, comprising over 20% each of the total water consumed. Our ODFM team continues to identify areas for improvement as part of our refurbishment efforts and we will work harder to accelerate our efforts to achieve our target to reduce water intensity by 35% by 2020.

46 Million Cubic Metres (m3 per capita)

Million Cubic Metres (‘000,000 m3)

2.0 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 FY11

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Figure 12. Total water consumption

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

Figure 13. Water intensity per capita

Water intensity (m3 per sqm)

1.7 1.6 1.5

21% 31%

1.4

4%

1.3 1.2 1.1

33%

NTU Academic Building Auxiliary and Common Services Employee, Student and commercial residences National Institute of Education Commercial

11%

1 FY11

FY12

FY13

Figure 14. Water intensity per square metre

FY14

FY15

Figure 15. Breakdown of water consumption by building type for FY15

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Waste We are committed to reducing our waste to landfill through recycling and waste management programs. With a number of different waste streams from residential halls, commercial areas and academic buildings, NTU has a responsibility to try and minimise waste generation and ensure that all waste is disposed of in a proper manner. Waste reduction initiatives In an effort towards a zero waste campus, at least 1 set of recycling bins (4 bin system) is available at each building complex (about 200 complexes and growing). Earthlink NTU also organises regular recycling drives and e-waste recycling. In addition, we are also committed to implement composting of agriculture waste on campus residential area. All canteens also use reusable cutlery and tableware for dine-in service and to discourage the use of disposable containers, take-away containers cost an extra $0.20. NTU was the first Institution of Higher Learning to implement Managed Print Services campus-wide, which has helped to actively manage and optimise printing devices and services to reduce wastage. On-going for the past 4 years, this initiative has helped to reduce printing and energy costs by 50% as well as improve workplace efficiency and productivity. It has also considerably reduced paper consumption and reduced the university’s carbon footprint. In addition, default doublesided black and white printing was implemented since 2011 in all libraries, computer labs and printing rooms to reduce paper wastage and conserve resources. NTU has also been practicing a process of ‘paperless admission applications’ since 2003. In a new initiative since 2014, the university sent admission offer letters to students electronically.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Addressing food waste across NTU Food Bank @ NTU was launched in January 2016 to support The Food Bank Singapore, a registered charity that strives to bridge the gap in the market by collecting surplus food in the market and providing it to organisations and people in need of food. A collaborative effort between Welfare Services Club (WSC) and Earthlink NTU, the aim of this initiative is to encourage the NTU community to donate their unwanted yet unopened and unexpired food items, which might otherwise be thrown away. The student team is responsible for monitoring the four collection boxes that have been placed in prominent locations around the campus, and handing collected items over to The Food Bank Singapore on a regular basis. They also organise outreach campaigns on campus to increase awareness about food waste. To further support this effort, Earthlink NTU is currently exploring the inclusion of food items in its end-of-semester recycling drives, which traditionally collects notes and paper-related items from students staying in the halls. WSC has also leveraged on their existing programmes, such as their annual food collection and distribution drive, Food For Hope, to help spread the word about food banking. Residents in the nearby neighbourhood have been informed about Food Bank @ NTU and the various collection points on campus. Through Food Bank @ NTU, it is envisioned that the NTU community will be more aware of food as an important resource that some families and individuals are struggling to obtain, and do their part to ensure that food waste is reduced.

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Performance NTU has been collecting waste data since 2011 to track our progress against our target of reducing waste intensity by 35% by 2020. In FY15, 2,892 tons of waste was collected in the NTU main bin center. Waste generation and intensity has been decreasing, which has led to a 27% reduction in waste intensity per square metre and 21% reduction in waste intensity per capita from FY11 baseline levels. Recycling rates on campus, however, has also significantly decreased. In FY11, recycled waste comprised 18% of total waste, but in FY15, it was only 2.4% of total waste. It has been observed that the reduction in the amount of recyclables might be due to an increase in personal recycling activities. Hazardous waste is treated separately by each of the schools and the different institutions at NTU. In FY16, we will check with all institutions what type of data is available and we aim to develop an easy-to-use data template in FY17 to start collecting data. We hope to report on this in FY18. In January 2016, EcoCampus undertook a qualitative study of waste management at the NTU main campus to understand the current waste management system and identify areas of improvement. The main campus is divided into 11 zones for the purpose of waste collection. Interviews and site visits were conducted and a number of issues and gaps were identified; general waste bins were contaminated with other types of waste that could be recycled, food waste was a large proportion of the waste and there was lack of data on the exact amount and type of waste being disposed. To further our progress in this area, we will look into conducting a campus-wide waste audit to better determine the key issues and how we can manage them in order to achieve our waste intensity target. 28

NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Table 3: Breakdown of waste generation in NTU from FY11 – FY15* FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

Paper

221

90

25

42

33

Plastics

281

100

10

27

24

Glass

59

22

4

8

7

Metal scrap

83

13

4

4

3

General waste (Tons)

2983

3061

2926

2884

2824

Total waste (Tons)

3628

3286

2970

2964

2892

* Waste data only available until December 2015. Hence, FY15 data has to be partially estimated. Data does not include hazardous waste, which is managed separately by individual NTU schools.

3.5

Waste intensity (tons per sqm)

3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 FY11

FY12

FY13

FY14

FY15

FY14

FY15

Figure 16. Waste intensity per square metre

Waste intensity (tons per capita)

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 FY11

FY12

FY13

Figure 17. Waste intensity per capita NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

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Campus operations

100% of NTU campus buildings to be certified Green Mark Platinum by 2020

100% carbon free shuttle vehicles and campus fleet by 2020

Sustainable Procurement Policy in place in

FY 2017

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

We have identified our key material topics in this area as being: Transportation, Procurement and Green Buildings. NTU aims to provide a conducive teaching and learning environment and endeavours to do so in the most sustainable way. We showcase state-of-the art technology and construction around our campus and aim to have a sustainable supply chain for our operations.

Transportation We aim to be recognised globally as a leader in implementing sustainable mobility planning and technologies in our campus. Sustainable transportation on campus NTU’s sprawling campus covers over 200 hectares, which presents some challenges in getting around. Walking from one end of the campus to the other can take up to one hour. To facilitate the movement of students, employees and visitors across the campus, NTU provides an internal shuttle bus that runs two different routes – the red and blue line, both of which stop at several key buildings on campus. In addition, NTU encourages cycling around campus and there are around 1,650 bicycle racks on campus with almost every building equipped with a bicycle rack and shower facilities. Encouraging the use of public transport NTU provides a free shuttle bus service, Campus Rider, to and from Pioneer MRT station that can be used by anyone visiting NTU. We further encourage the use of public transport by students by providing free shuttle services for our students to and from seven other MRT stations. We will continue to expand our shuttle services from other MRT stations as demand from other areas increases. Electric Mobility on Campus NTU is designing a future-ready campus. The campus has created 2 designated electric-vehicle and hybrid car charging stations and has special parking lots for electric or hybrid cars. NTU is also test-bedding several electric and autonomous vehicles on campus and has 2 electric cars, 2 driverless vehicles and 2 electric bicycles for research purposes. One of the major projects NTU is test-bedding is NAVYA, an electric driverless shuttle bus. In March this year, the [email protected] e-mobility team began providing thrice weekly shuttle services using NAVYA to transport passengers from point to point on campus. The pre-determined routes were from CleanTech One to Hall 11 Residences and The Hive to North Spine, which takes 20 minutes and 15 minutes respectively.

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Procurement We aim to procure our resources in an ecologically sound, socially just, and economically viable manner and proactively engage with our key suppliers on their sustainability performance. Our supply chain includes goods and services required for our campus operations, as well as the procurement of contractors for the construction of new facilities. In FY15, NTU had a supplier base of over 3,780 suppliers with the top 90% from Singapore and Europe. Our total spend on suppliers was over $250 million. Sustainable procurement is currently being practised by the ODFM. The ODFM adheres to a Sustainable and Environmental Friendly Procurement Policy which was developed in 2014, and provides guidance on the purchasing and requisition of products and services. The policy is used internally to ensure that due consideration is taken to purchase products that conserves energy and water or are produced in an environmentally-friendly way. The ODFM also screens contractors before they start work to ensure that they adhere to the Safety and Health Handbook for Contractors, which includes stipulations on environmental protection and waste disposal. Contractors are also evaluated by ODFM once their work is completed and scored according to their performance in 5 key areas. NTU is currently looking to develop a campus-wide sustainable purchasing policy and we will provide an update on this in future reports.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Green Buildings Our commitment to sustainability is most visible in the built infrastructure on its campus. We envision having a campus with the highest percentage (by floor space) of certified sustainable ‘green’ buildings among major universities. Therefore, we ensure that all new construction projects and all renovation projects adhere to the highest practical sustainable construction standards.

oversees all new developments and existing facilities and is responsible for achieving the Green Mark certifications. A winner of BCA’s Green Mark Champion award in 2014, NTU has been expanding its campus as well as retrofitting its existing buildings to meet higher BCA Green Mark standards in recent years. As of December 2015, 20 building projects in NTU have been Green Mark-certified, out of which 18 have attained the highest Platinum status. Retrofitting existing buildings

Campus Sustainability Guidelines The management and refurbishment of campus facilities is governed by the Campus Sustainability Guidelines which was developed by the ODFM in 2014. It serves as a guide for NTU’s Project Managers and Consultants to work towards NTU’s vision of being the greenest campus in the world. It encourages the use of green technology and eco-friendly features and provides guidelines on energy conservation measures, water efficiency and rainwater collection, material and waste management. The policy is evaluated every two years to ensure the efficacy of the measures proposed and continual improvement of the environmental performance of the campus. Leading the way with Green Mark NTU is committed to helping achieve the national target to green at least 80% of Singapore’s buildings by 2030. The University has been on a rapid drive to green all its new campus buildings, as well as to retrofit the existing ones. The ODFM team

We currently have over 760 buildings on campus, with some dating back to 1954. With such a large range of building ages, it has been a challenge to retrofit our buildings with more sustainable features due to limitations in the infrastructure. However, we have strived to continue our efforts in identifying opportunities to upgrade our buildings and, in 2015 alone, we have managed to achieve over 3,600 MWh in estimated energy savings from refurbished buildings that have met Green Mark standards. This has been achieved through a number of initiatives including installing more efficient watercooled chiller plants, motion sensors for common areas and extensive use of LED lighting. NTU also offers employees the opportunity to undertake training to become a Certified Green Mark Manager as well as refresher courses when needed. This enables us to ensure that relevant employees are kept up to date on the Green Mark standards as well as new and innovative ways to achieve more efficient buildings.

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Casestudy: NTU Sports Hall

NTU is building the region’s first sports hall with a unique long-span timber roof structure that provides five times better heat insulation than concrete. The three-storey hall, which is set to open at the end of 2016, is the first building in South-east Asia to use engineered wood on such a large scale. It involves engineered wood systems such as cross-lamination and glulamination, in which numerous laminated small pieces of timber form a single large piece. This is much lighter than steel, which allows for a design that does not need supporting pillars. It will also feature a 72m-long wave roof made of timber. Apart from sustainable features such as energy-saving LED lighting and solar powered systems, the sports hall is designed to take advantage of their natural surroundings. Using computer modelling of the sun and wind patterns on-site, the buildings’ designers aim to harness natural winds so students will enjoy good ventilation. The sports hall will also have two-layer walls designed for heat insulation on hot days and will have special metal coils with cold water

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

flowing through them. This will cool the wind that enters the hall and removes hot air quickly through convection, giving students a unique sports experience. Students will be able to play badminton without any wind disruption from fans or the need for air-conditioning to stay cool. These eco features will save over 40% in energy consumption and 30% in water consumption. Key Green Features: 1. Energy-efficient Induction Air Distribution System which contributes about 7.3% of overall energy saving. 2. Sustainable façade using Engineered Wood System, namely cross laminated timber (CLT) and glued laminated timber (Glulam) for the whole building. 3. Heat Recovery System for hot water which contributes 3.7% of overall energy saving. 4. Daylight sensors in the common areas and motion sensors for all toilets. 5. Energy-efficient Chiller Plant System. 6. Extensive use of LED lights and energyefficient lighting system. 7. Extensive use of sustainable products.

Casestudy: North Hill Residential Halls

NTU’s three new residential halls at North Hill will be Singapore’s first public high-rise buildings using a new “Legostyle” construction method that allows prefabricated individual rooms to be stacked on top of each other. Whole rooms complete with internal fixtures such as lighting, windows, and fans, are built at the factory and then put together on-site, which ensures consistency in workmanship and better overall construction quality. Known as “Prefabricated Pre-Finished Volumetric Construction” (PPVC), this method saves up to 40% in manpower and 20% in construction time. It also reduces noise and dust pollution on-site as more activities are done off-site. To reduce the need for air-conditioning, all rooms in the residential hall will have windows that reflect heat using a special coating, and louvres that shield any direct sunlight. 

The new 13-storey residential halls will be a one-stop integrated hub with eateries, shops and common spaces such as rooftop gardens with BBQ pits, lounges and study rooms. It will accommodate over 1,850 students, and will house the campus’ largest fully-equipped gym, which is about five times the size of a four-room HDB flat.

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Sustainability education and research

NTU is committed to investing our resources in providing opportunities for our students, researchers and faculty to learn and conduct research on important sustainability issues. We have identified our key material topics in this area as being: Education Programmes and Research Programmes. NTU tightly couples its sustainability strategy to its core mission of research and education by preparing students for entering the global workforce as leaders, driving change for a sustainable world. NTU will leverage its position as a leading academic institution in the region and aims to be a collaborative partner of choice for major corporations, funding partners and NGOs who share its vision regarding sustainability.

Our 2020 goals

450

60

500

30

3,000

courses related to environment/ sustainability

ongoing industry collaboration projects per year

patents related to sustainability

spin-offs/ start-ups related to sustainability

academic publications related to sustainability

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Education programmes We are committed to embedding sustainability throughout our educational programmes by offering our students an integrated perspective on how sustainability applies to their chosen fields of study. A multidisciplinary approach Sustainability at NTU is a multidisciplinary subject that is covered across various degrees and programmes. NTU offers over 200 undergraduate courses and over 110 graduate courses across its 12 schools that are related to sustainability. Since 2014, NTU introduced a mandatory sustainability module for all first year undergraduate students entitled ‘Introduction to Sustainability: Multidisciplinary Approaches and Solutions’. The course covers topics like Sustainability and the Earth, Sustainable Business and the Political Economy of Sustainability and provides a holistic view of sustainability and the world. About 7,000 new undergraduate students are introduced to sustainability through this course each year. NTU’s Interdisciplinary Graduate School (IGS) has been in operation since June 2012 and is dedicated to multi-disciplinary research and postgraduate training – the first of its kind in Asia. The IGS offers a 4-year PhD scholarship worth about S$200,000 for successful applicants to undertake research within NTU’s Peaks of Excellence in Sustainable Earth, Secure Community, Healthy Society and Global Asia. The IGS currently has 167 postgraduate students in its Sustainable Earth programme who are attached to leading research institutes such as the Earth Observatory of Singapore, [email protected] and NEWRI. An Asian focus The Asian School of the Environment (ASE) was recently created in 2014 as a new interdisciplinary School that focuses on environmental research on Asian environmental challenges. The ASE integrates earth and environmental life science, ecology, engineering and technology, human ecology, humanities, and the social sciences to address key issues of the environment and sustainability. The School offers three courses dedicated to the Asian environment: Ph.D. in Earth Sciences, Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Earth Systems Science and a Minor in Environmental Sustainability.

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Research programmes NTU has a vibrant research culture and has created a name internationally for its work in fields such as clean energy and environment, advanced materials, intelligent systems, nanotechnology and wireless and broadband communication. We continue to strengthen our position as a leading university by developing world-class research programmes that apply our expertise in technology and innovation to sustainability-related endeavours, and utilising our campus as a ‘living laboratory’. Dedicated sustainability funding NTU’s Sustainable Earth Peak has dedicated research funding, and also provides seed money grants annually. The funding provides an opportunity to the NTU research community to form unique collaborations between different groups and disciplines to develop sustainability solutions for cities. Over the past 4 years, the Sustainable Earth Office has provided S$1,723,519 in funding for a total of 36 projects. In FY15 alone, S$380,120 was awarded to 8 projects that focused on issues ranging from diseaseelimination to sustainable transport.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Leading entrepreneurship

New research programmes

NTU has taken a pro-active approach in its strategy on innovation and entrepreneurship across the campus, bringing innovation to the heart of the University’s activities. NTUitive was created as the University’s innovation and enterprise company, which supports the University’s mission to develop an ecosystem which encourages innovation, fosters entrepreneurship and facilitates the commercialisation of research. It oversees the Innovation Centre, which links potential entrepreneurs with NTU’s sophisticated technology and technical expertise. As of 31 March 2016, NTUitive had 283 IPs and patents related to sustainability and 24 start-ups in the cleantech/ sustainability domain. Some examples of our successful start-ups include Aquaporin Asia Pte Ltd, which makes and sells aquaporin-based biomimetic membranes for use in water treatment processes and KVI Pte Ltd that is developing a series of products that can recharge batteries and monitor the health of batteries for enhanced lifecycle performance and increased battery safety.

In FY15, NTU entered into three new research collaborations with local and international organisations, focusing on electromobility. On 29 June 2015, BMW Group and Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) launched a new electromobility research programme, focusing on two new areas, Electromobility in Asia and also Smart Materials. This is in addition to the original three research topics that the joint lab is working on: Advanced Battery, Driver Enhancement and Intelligent Mobility. The main goal of embarking on the Electromobility in Asia project is to find out how drivers interact with BMW i vehicles in real life, so as to better understand user behaviours and to improve electric and plug-in hybrid technology for the future. On 18 November 2015, an MOU was signed with the Land Transport Authority (LTA) NTU to set up a transport research centre to enhance knowledge and develop innovative solutions in areas such as active mobility, electro-mobility, self-driving vehicles and cyber-secure transportation systems to help improve Singapore’s transport system. It was one of three MOUs signed by LTA and local universities at the inaugural LTA Future Mobility Symposium at Marina Bay Sands.

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At the forefront of electromobility research Sustainable transportation is a key research area in NTU. Over the past few years, NTU has collaborated on a number of electro-mobility research projects. In FY15, two of our major projects, EVA and NAVYA, were publically launched and made headlines across the industry. These projects showcased the potential for sustainable transport in the public transportation and private ownership space and research is ongoing to further improve their applicability in real life.

The World’s First Electric Taxi For The Tropics Named EVA, the electric taxi was built by TUM CREATE, a collaboration between NTU and one of Europe’s top universities, Germany’s Technische Universität München (TUM). It was officially launched in April 2015 after 4 years of intensive research and development and showcases the potential for future electro-mobility. Some of EVA’s key eco-features include: • A fast-charging battery system that gives EVA a range of up to 200km with just a 15-minute recharge. • Lightweight carbon-fibre composites, which makes EVA 150kg lighter than other comparable-sized taxis. • Ergonomically designed seats that are equipped with a purpose-built system to remove moisture and heat from seats’ surfaces, maximising passengers’ comfort. Its innovative design and various features is very practical for Singapore’s climate. By replacing fuel-burning vehicles with electric-powered ones, carbon emissions as well as local noise and exhaust emissions can be reduced. Moving forward, TUM CREATE will look at testing the car further on the NTU campus. NTU’s complete eco system of public and private transportation, including public and shuttle buses, private cars, bicycles and prototype autonomous vehicles makes it the ideal living test-bed.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

NAVYA In August 2013, NTU, in partnership with JTC and Induct Technologies, began road-testing a driverless shuttle to optimize and improve the reliability and efficiency of the vehicle. The shuttle, which is named NAVYA, can carry 10 passengers with a maximum speed of 20.1km/h. The shuttle carries people independently and has proper obstacle detection and path planning with the help of LIDARS and other on-board sensors. When users get on board the shuttle, they find a user interface offering the various stops the shuttle goes to. They select their destination on the screen, and the shuttle automatically sets off for it. It is expected to provide a safe, reliable and environmentally-friendly alternative mode of transport. It runs on electric batteries and has been tested to follow a pre-programmed route between NTU and JTC’s CleanTech Park. When work first began, it took 6 hours to charge its battery, and now the team has managed to cut that time down to an hour. On a single charge, the bus can cover 100 – 110km. The project, supported by the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB), started out as a two-year collaboration, but work is currently ongoing to focus on the development and testing of various new charging technologies such as wireless self-charging, self-diagnostics, traffic modelling, sensor co-ordination and new super capacitors for electric vehicles and reduce the charging time to less than 2 minutes.

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Renewable energy research NTU began a new collaboration with the University of California’s Berkeley Education Alliance for Research in Singapore (BEARS) in April 2015. The Singapore-Berkeley Research Initiative for Sustainable Energy (SinBeRISE) seeks to harness solar energy using novel, inexpensive approaches. It aims to substantially improve the overall efficiency of photovoltaic (PV) devices and harvest solar energy for conversion into electricity and fuels. Under the Singapore-Berkeley Building Efficiency and Sustainability in the Tropics (SinBerBEST) project, researchers aim to deliver energy efficient building technologies for the tropical built environment, while optimising human comfort, safety, security, and productivity within the building. Over 100 leading researchers consisting of post-doctoral fellows, research associates, and PhD students are involved across both projects, of which more than 20 are NTU faculty members.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

REIDS: Systems & technologies for sustainable & affordable energy access-for-all in Southeast Asia The population of the 10 countries generally grouped under Southeast Asia – Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam – presently stands at 625 million. Some 100 million people live in 11 large metropolitan agglomerations. Another 125 million have either no access at all or very sporadic, unsatisfactory access to energy. The key energy infrastructure required to address the need for better and more affordable energy access in the region relies on off-grid microgrids. To support the development of those microgrids in Southeast Asia, NTU is leading the initiative to build up a Renewable Energy Integration Demonstrator Singapore (REIDS), which will be the largest hybrid microgrid in the tropics. This initiative is strongly supported by the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB), and the National Environment Agency (NEA). The multimillion dollar initial microgrid infrastructure facilitates the development and commercialisation of energy technologies suited for tropical conditions to be developed by NTU together with a consortium of world leading companies, the “REIDS partners”. REIDS and its partners will test and demonstrate among others the integration of solar, wind, tidal, diesel, storage and powerto-gas technologies, and ensure these energy sources operate well together.

REIDS vision is to pave the way towards sustainable multi-activity off-grid communities. REIDS fosters systemic research and development in the broad energy arena in support of Singapore’s corporate and public entities as well as stakeholders in Southeast Asia, thereby strengthening their position on the rapidly growing renewable energy and microgrids markets. In the context of REIDS, NTU together with Grid Solutions (a GE and Alstom joint venture) will jointly develop a unique MicroGrid Power Mix Management solution, based on Alstom’s Digital Automation Platform (DAP), which will manage power exchanges within a microgrid both when it is connected to or separated from the main grid. This solution is to be implemented at NTU’s Block S2.1 and subsequently on the Semakau Landfill, an offshore landfill between the islands Pulau Semakau and Pulau Sakeng, located south of the main island of Singapore. The deployment will allow NTU to further enhance the energy efficiency of its campus while also integrating a mix of distributed energy resources, such as solar, wind, diesel and gas technologies, deployed in the Campus.

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Community engagement NTU is committed to serving our local, national, ASEAN and global community to connect like-minded people and act as a catalyst for positive change.

Engage

10,000 students in sustainability awareness and outreach activities per year by 2020

Conduct an annual sustainability survey by

FY 2017

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

We have identified our key material topics in this area as being: campus community engagement and public engagement. NTU believes sustainability can only be realised through collaborative effort between the university and wider community. NTU pursues to engage students, faculty members and staff in its ongoing sustainability efforts and aims to make a difference in the wider community through our various collaborations.

Engaging our students, faculty and employees Our students, faculty and employees are the soul of NTU. We proactively engage with our campus community through stimulating ongoing events and awareness activities to motivate action towards our our sustainability mission and goals. We believe in empowering our campus community to take action and aim to provide an open and supportive environment for their initiatives. Campus-wide initiatives NTU has a variety of initiatives that engages the wider campus community. Sustainability awareness is raised through quarterly online newsletters that are created by EcoCampus. The newsletters provide updates on EcoCampus projects as well as other sustainability events and collaborations that are ongoing in NTU. It also provides an update on how NTU is tracking with regards to their 2020 goals and serves as a great way to communicate with the campus community. In FY15, the Environment and Sustainability Research Cluster in NTU’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences organized monthly Sustainability Salons. There were 15 events organized in FY15, which aimed to foster trans-disciplinary sharing and informal conversations about sustainability ideas and issues and promote cross-disciplinary conversations and collaboration for research.

Interactive user engagement Co-designed

133 NTU students

with

1800+ players from NTU 60,000+ ecogestures declared

In an attempt to engage the campus community about energy efficiency, EcoCampus launched an experimental game called PowerZ in the first half of 2015. The PowerZ app, co-developed by [email protected] and ENGIE Lab Singapore, was free to download by campus users and was designed with gamification elements such as avatar profiles, stories, levels and achievements, which provided a fun experience for users while being educational. Through the app, users could provide feedback on their comfort levels wherever they were on campus and also pledge eco-gestures to earn points. The feedback was later used by facility managers to adjust air-conditioning set-points. The app was successful in engaging the campus community and helped to increase awareness about energy consumption. It was downloaded by over 1,800 people with 300 active users and had a digital community of over 950 followers on the PowerZ Facebook Page. In addition, the pilot phase showed that feedback on comfort levels by users could help to reduce energy consumption by more than 1%. A new version of the app is currently being developed and is earmarked to be launched nationwide to be used by government agencies, HDBs and companies to help them engage their users in energy efficiency.

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Student Experience Survey Each year, NTU conducts a Student Experience Survey to gain feedback from students about their experience at NTU. The survey covers a range of topics including views on the quality of their degree, campus life and campus facilities. NTU takes the views of students seriously and feedback from previous surveys have led to various improvements across campus including more study areas, better sports facilities and the provision of shuttle buses from key housing estates. The two key metrics that NTU monitors is the Student Satisfaction Index and the Student Engagement Index. Both these indices reflect how well NTU is performing in terms of providing an enriching learning experience to students and how students perceive NTU. This year’s Student Satisfaction Index was 84% favourable. The Student Engagement Index was 79.6% favourable, with 85.2% of students saying they would recommend NTU to their peers. Students appreciated NTU’s conducive campus facilities and learning environment, as well as its strong global reputation. Some students hoped to see wider variety in food and beverage options, as well as improvements in shuttle bus services, more hall accommodation. The university has been addressing these matters.

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Capturing kinetic energy NTU installed energy generating floor tiles along the North-South Spine Linkway. Acting as a test-bed for harvesting clean energy, it also serves to engage students in a unique way. These tiles capture the kinetic energy generated from footsteps and converts it to electricity that is used to power the LED signages attached to it.

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Student-led-action Calendar of Events 20 Oct 2015 No Waste Day Campaign 9 Nov 2015 Recycling Drive Semester 1 26 Jan 2016 Keep them e-live 2016   17 Feb 2016 Greening NTU 2016 14 March 2016 Greenfest Our Earth 2016 19 March 2016 Earth Hour 2016 @ Jurong Spring

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

Earthlink NTU is a student-led organisation that aims to increase the community’s awareness on environmental issues and has been active since 1993. Earthlink NTU works to advocate an environmentally sustainable lifestyle and address climate change in small, achievable and measurable ways. In FY15, Earthlink organized over 20 events targeted at the campus community and general public. These include events such as nature walks, e-waste recycling campaigns and coastal cleanups. They also have an annual flagship event, Greenfest, which aims to promote environmental awareness and showcase Earthlink NTU’s activities. This year’s Greenfest was themed “Our Earth”, and emphasized the need for collective effort from everyone – government, nongovernmental organisations (NGOs), companies, organisations and individuals. Held between 14-15 March 2016, the event featured over 15 booths hosting a variety of partners from NGOs, companies, government agencies, research institutes and Earthlink’s portfolios. Employees and students were offered a glimpse of the environmental issues plaguing the environment, as well as various solutions being implemented to mitigate the consequences.

Shell Eco-marathon Asia Shell Eco-marathon is a unique competition that challenges students around the world to design, build and drive the most energy-efficient car. NTU students have been participating in the event since 2010. This year NTU won six awards, emerging as the best performing university this year. The two NTU teams, comprising 16 engineering students, took a year to build the cars at the Innovation Lab at the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. NTU Venture 8, Singapore’s first 3D printed urban solar electric car, won three off-track awards - in Vehicle Design, Communications, and Safety. Overall, NTU beat 117 entrants from 17 countries to secure four out of five off-track awards, as well as two bronze awards in the on-track battery electric category. The competition has inspired our students to innovate and create sustainable mobility solutions and is a great example of our students leading the sustainability agenda.

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Community engagement NTU reaches beyond the campus and contributes to a synergy among community engagement initiatives that extend from the academics to the local community. By sharing knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity, NTU aims to make meaningful connections with communities and stimulate positive change. Academic and public engagements Under the EcoCampus Initiative framework, academic and industry collaboration is a key emphasis. All projects involve participation from various stakeholders and is a platform for engaging the wider research community in NTU and other universities as well as the public through the showcasing of our innovative projects. Public agencies, such as the National Environmental Agency (NEA), Economic Development Board (EDB) and Energy Market Authority (EMA), also form part of the EcoCampus Steering Committee and are regularly engaged through steering committee meetings. In January 2016, EcoCampus began a ‘Sustainability Speaker Series’, which aims to be a platform for attendees to gain invaluable insights in sustainability. Invited speakers share about sustainability practices of the company, and their experience as a sustainability practitioner. This has gained great feedback and will be continuing in FY16. NTU organises and hosts a number of symposiums and workshops around sustainability issues, bringing together various stakeholders to share knowledge and ideas on a common platform. Through these events, NTU is able to showcase our efforts towards a more sustainable earth and engage with leading academia and professionals in this field.

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One of the major events for the year is the Annual Sustainability Symposium (S3), which is organised by NTU’s Sustainable Earth Office (SEO). In its second year, the S3 was held from 15-17 April 2015 with an aim to drive collaboration and sharing in sustainability. Titled ‘Sustainable City Design’, the symposium welcomed speakers from all around the world including Australia, Canada, China and India to share the challenges faced by cities and urbanisation. The symposium was well-received with over 460 people attending the event. The SEO also organises smaller roundtable events and seminars that focuses on key sustainability topics and helps drive real conversations. This year, they organised a roundtable discussion on Organising and Incentivizing a Sustainable Society (6 August 2015) and a seminar on the WaterEnergy Nexus (19 June 2015). Both events brought together leading professionals in their fields of work and provided an engaging session for over 330 participants. Another key event for the year is the Annual Education for Sustainability in Asia Conference organized by the Environment and Sustainability Research Cluster in NTU School of Humanities and Social Sciences. Held from 5-6 February 2015 and titled ‘Post-Secondary Education for Sustainability in Asia: Curricula, Case Studies and CommunityBuilding’, the conference aimed to explore how educators can best disseminate knowledge accumulated and generated in sustainable research to students in the classroom context. The Nanyang Business School (NBS) has a specific research centre for business sustainability. The Centre for Business Sustainability is a strategic partner with the Singapore Business Federation (SBF) for the Singapore Sustainable Business Awards and Green Technology Awards. Since 2014, NBS and SBF jointly publish a case-book featuring case studies on Singapore firms that have successfully implemented sustainable business practices and innovative green technologies. The Centre also organises an interdisciplinary Research Seminar Series on Business Sustainability. As part of the seminar series, the Centre invites several leading global scholars on corporate sustainability. NTU Sustainability Report FY2015

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Networking with our peers

Reaching out locally and regionally

NTU is one of the co-host institutions for the ISCN. The ISCN is a network of colleges, universities, and corporate campuses who come together to exchange information, ideas, and best practices for achieving sustainable campus operations and integrating sustainability in research and teaching. NTU provides monetary resources and leadership in both the ISCN Board as Vice-President (Prof Subodh Mhaisalkar, Executive Director, [email protected]) and the Advisory Committee (Mr Nilesh Y Jadhav, Program Director (EcoCampus), [email protected]).

Our Student and Academic Services Department has an active Community Engagement team that enables NTU students to organise community events and projects that have a social impact. Funding is provided for various clubs and groups in NTU to organise outreach activities to the local community here in Singapore and regionally. The projects help to address social and environmental topics or issues faced by the local communities and aims to make a difference in someone’s life.

NTU also provides leadership support in GlobalTech. The alliance is a network of the world’s top technological universities and aims to address global societal issues through science and technology, covering topics such as sustainability and global environmental change, security of energy and water and food supplies. Prof Bertil Andersson (President NTU) is a board member, while Er Meng Hwa (Vice President International Affairs NTU) is part of the working committee. In 2015, NTU invited members of the alliance to the Engineering Deans’ Meeting focusing on “Rebranding Engineering for the 21st Century“.

In addition, Earthlink NTU also created Earthlink Ecoventure in 2009 to help under-resourced communities in a sustainable way. Over the years, Ecoventure has conducted projects in Indonesia and Laos and this year they continued their efforts to introduce renewable energy to a different rural community school in Laos.

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Improving basic infrastructure

Providing light and electricity

Weetrip took place over two weeks from 13 – 27 December 2015. A team of 20 Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information (WKWSCI) students headed to Na’ Learng Village in Laos to help with basic construction activities as well as to conduct enrichment activities for the local village students.

From 14 – 28 June, 24 Earthlink members went on a 15-day expedition to Ban Phongsavanh, a rural village in Laos. This project is a continuation of Earthlink’s efforts to introduce renewable energy to different rural community schools in Laos which was started in 2014.

Over 14 days, the team looked at trying to improve the hygiene of the toilet facilities in the Na’Learng / Na’Tai Village Primary School as the standard was quite poor. They began with laying the foundation for a new toilet and subsequently, the rest of the construction was completed with the help of the local construction workers. The team also conducted enrichment activities for the primary school students in the village who were very eager to learn. The expedition proved to be an eye-opening and humbling experience for most of the team, and the villagers were extremely grateful for all their help.

Over the course of two weeks, the Ecoventure team installed electric lights and fans in five classrooms to create a more conducive environment for learning and also installed a 2kW solar panel system, sponsored by YingLi Solar, to power the school, as they did not have access to the national electricity grid. In addition, the Ecoventure team conducted English, Science, and Environment classes for the local children. The expedition was a resounding success, resulting in the successful installation of the solar panels and a rewarding experience for volunteers.

Bridging the migrant worker gap Four final-year students from the WKWSCI are working on a campaign to collect and share the stories of low-wage migrant workers in Singapore. Titled ‘Familiar Strangers’, the project team strives to provide a platform for them to tell their own stories, in their own words and through other means of expression such as photos and videos, so that others can realise that they are also friends who are in pursuit of a better life for themselves and their family. They believe that the gap can be bridged through raw first-person narratives. Through these, they hope to give Singaporeans an opportunity to learn more about the lives of low-wage migrant workers.

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NEWRIComm – creating a better shared future in Asia NTU’s Environment & Water Research Institute Community Development (NEWRIComm) team acts as the community development arm of NEWRI and works to create a better shared future in Asia through innovations and holistic solutions in water technologies. Through its water and sanitation-related development work, it addresses five levels of objectives – individual beneficiaries, benefitting community, providing education, achieving a balanced ecosystem, and enabling healthy waterbodies. Since March 2010, NEWRIComm has been managing Phase 2 of the Environmental Endeavour of The Lien Foundation. With a vision to provide for a better life through environmental education, and to bring clean water and sanitation to deserving communities in the region, NEWRIComm works with leading researchers in the field to tackle water and sanitation challenges through research and education. They also provide funding aid to develop innovative water and sanitation solutions for rural communities and transfer knowledge to empower these communities. They are currently supporting eight LEF projects in six countries — Bhutan, India, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar and Sri Lanka.

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The Bonus in Biogas Sumedang is known for its tofu production. Sumedang tofu, produced largely by family-owned small-to-medium sized factories, has been identified by the regency as a superior local product and as a significant contributor to the local economy. Each kilogram of tofu needs about 20 litres of clean water to produce and generates 10 litres of wastewater. Thus, a smallto-medium sized factory would approximately produce 1-2 m3 of wastewater a day. In absence of treatment facilities, all of this wastewater is disposed directly to the waterways. The high organic content of tofu means that its wastewater turns septic quickly and gives a strong stench. This often draws complaints from downstream and neighbouring communities. According to 2013 statistics, there are 282 tofu factories in Sumedang, producing 12,700 tonnes of tofu per year. In 2013, LEF provided funding to Dr Neni Sintawardani from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences, to design and build a community-run wastewater treatment plant that eliminated the wastewater problem. The biogas plant is undergoing trials now and is in the commissioning phase, where the biogas is being used in the kitchens. Currently, the biogas production is estimated to be capable of meeting daily cooking needs of up to 90 households, but it is not yet adequate for the purpose of full-scale tofu production. The project has shown the potential viability of a communityrun wastewater treatment plant that also supports the local economy by keeping it sustainable. The wastewater treatment facility is scheduled for handover in December 2016.

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“Now we have Clean Water” Gunungkidul Regency spreads over 1,485 km2 in Yogyakarta Province, Indonesia, with a population of close to 700,000 people. Water protection and distribution at the Gunungkidul Regency karst area is challenging as rainwater quickly drains into underground rivers with minimal soil infiltration and storage. In addition, the mountainous terrain makes access to piped supply costly. This area suffers water shortages for at least four months a year and the local villagers then have to purchase water or wait for government truck deliveries. In 2013, Mr Agus Suyanto from the Yogyakarta School of Environmental Engineering, constructed a permanent well that provides clean and safe water. Members from the Candirejo Village youth organization were trained on well maintenance, and 450 villagers, students and their parents from Candirejo and nearby villages were educated on safe drinking water habits. Two additional wells were also built nearby, based on the bank filtration well conceptualised by NEWRI, and serve neighbouring villages. The NEWRI Community Development team re-visited Candirejo in October 2015 to assess a completed project’s sustainability, more than two years after the well was handed over to the Nangsri Lor and Nangsri Kidul villages in Candirejo. The well was found to be well-maintained by the community, even using their own collective funds to replace spent membrane cartridges. Candirejo Village is positioned as the “demonstration community” for other communities with similar challenges to learn from and has been selected by the local government’s Department of Public Works as a pilot development site.

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Data and methodology All data in this report represents the financial year 2015 ending 31 March 2016, unless otherwise stated. Emissions Scope 1 emissions were only inclusive of NTU’s internal shuttle bus. Carbon emissions were calculated using the EPA emissions factors. The source can be found at: https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-07/documents/ emission-factors_2014.pdf. Scope 2 emissions represented purchased electricity. The grid emission factor was derived from Singapore’s Energy Market Authority. Scope 3 emissions were calculated using the Carbon Neutral Company’s carbon calculator. The document provided emissions factors and definition of short, medium, and long haul flights. The source can be found at: http://www.carbonneutralcalculator.com/Carbon%20Offset%20Factors.pdf

Sources of information Corporate Communications Office EcoCampus Initiative Energy Research Institute @ NTU ([email protected]) Institutional Statistics Nanyang Environment & Water Institute (NEWRI) NTU Library NTU Shared Services: NSS Procurement and NSS Human Resources NTUitive Office of Development & Facilities Management (ODFM) Office of Finance Office of Housing & Auxiliary Services (HAS) Office of Human Resources Renewable Energy Integration Demonstrator-Singapore (REIDS) Research Support Office Student Affairs Office Sustainable Earth Office

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GRI Index General Standard Disclosures

Location

Strategy and Analysis G4-1

Message from the President

Organisational Profile G4-3 About Nanyang Technological University G4-4 About Nanyang Technological University G4-5 About Nanyang Technological University G4-6 About Nanyang Technological University G4-7 About Nanyang Technological University G4-8 About Nanyang Technological University G4-9 About Nanyang Technological University G4-10 About Nanyang Technological University G4-11 About Nanyang Technological University G4-12 Campus Operations > Procurement G4-13 About this report G4-14 Message from the President, Sustainability @ NTU G4-15 About Nanyang Technological University G4-16 About Nanyang Technological University Identified Material Aspects and Boundaries G4-17 NTU Annual Report FY15 G4-18 Sustainability @ NTU > Materiality assessment G4-19 Sustainability @ NTU > Materiality assessment G4-20 Sustainability @ NTU > Materiality assessment G4-21 Sustainability @ NTU > Materiality assessment G4-22 Not applicable as this is NTU’s first report. G4-23 Not applicable as this is NTU’s first report. Stakeholder Engagement G4-24 Sustainability @ NTU > Stakeholder engagement G4-25 Sustainability @ NTU > Stakeholder engagement G4-26 Sustainability @ NTU > Stakeholder engagement G4-27 Sustainability @ NTU > Stakeholder engagement Report Profile G4-28 About this report G4-29 About this report G4-30 About this report G4-31 About this report G4-32 About this report G4-33 About this report Governance G4-34 Sustainability @ NTU > Governance structure for sustainability Ethics and Integrity G4-56 About Nanyang Technological University

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GRI Index Specific Disclosures

Location

Energy DMA

Resource use and emissions > Energy and emissions

G4-EN3 Energy consumption within the organization

Resource use and emissions > Energy and emissions

G4-EN5 Energy intensity

Resource use and emissions > Energy and emissions

Water DMA

Resource use and emissions > Water

G4-EN8 Total water withdrawal by source

Resource use and emissions > Water

GHG Emissions DMA

Resource use and emissions > Energy and emissions

G4-EN15 Direct GHG emissions (Scope 1)

Resource use and emissions > Energy and emissions

G4-EN16 Energy indirect GHG emissions (Scope 2)

Resource use and emissions > Energy and emissions

G4-EN17 Other indirect GHG emissions (Scope 3)

Resource use and emissions > Energy and emissions

G4-EN19 Reduction of GHG emissions

Resource use and emissions > Energy and emissions

Waste DMA

Resource use and emissions > Waste

G4-EN23 Total weight of waste by type and disposal method

Resource use and emissions > Waste

Green buildings DMA

Campus operations > Green buildings

CRE8 Type and number of sustainability certification, rating and labelling schemes for new construction, management, occupation and redevelopment

Campus operations > Green buildings

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NTU Sustainability Report FY2015