WEB TECHNOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATIONS

WEB TECHNOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATIONS [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII...

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WEB TECHNOLOGY AND ITS APPLICATIONS [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code IA Marks 20 15CS71 Number of Lecture Hours/Week 04 Exam Marks 80 Total Number of Lecture Hours 50 Exam Hours 03 CREDITS – 04 Course Objectives: This course will enable students to • Illustrate the Semantic Structure of HTML and CSS • Compose forms and tables using HTML and CSS • Design Client-Side programs using JavaScript and Server-Side programs using PHP • Infer Object Oriented Programming capabilities of PHP • Examine JavaScript frameworks such as jQuery and Backbone Module – 1 Teaching Hours Introduction to HTML, What is HTML and Where did it come from?, HTML 10 Hours Syntax, Semantic Markup, Structure of HTML Documents, Quick Tour of HTML Elements, HTML5 Semantic Structure Elements, Introduction to CSS, What is CSS, CSS Syntax, Location of Styles, Selectors, The Cascade: How Styles Interact, The Box Model, CSS Text Styling. Module – 2 HTML Tables and Forms, Introducing Tables, Styling Tables, Introducing 10 Hours Forms, Form Control Elements, Table and Form Accessibility, Microformats, Advanced CSS: Layout, Normal Flow, Positioning Elements, Floating Elements, Constructing Multicolumn Layouts, Approaches to CSS Layout, Responsive Design, CSS Frameworks. Module – 3 JavaScript: Client-Side Scripting, What is JavaScript and What can it do?, 10 Hours JavaScript Design Principles, Where does JavaScript Go?, Syntax, JavaScript Objects, The Document Object Model (DOM), JavaScript Events, Forms, Introduction to Server-Side Development with PHP, What is Server-Side Development, A Web Server’s Responsibilities, Quick Tour of PHP, Program Control, Functions Module – 4 PHP Arrays and Superglobals, Arrays, $_GET and $_POST Superglobal Arrays, 10 Hours $_SERVER Array, $_Files Array, Reading/Writing Files, PHP Classes and Objects, Object-Oriented Overview, Classes and Objects in PHP, Object Oriented Design, Error Handling and Validation, What are Errors and Exceptions?, PHP Error Reporting, PHP Error and Exception Handling Module – 5 Managing State, The Problem of State in Web Applications, Passing Information 10 Hours via Query Strings, Passing Information via the URL Path, Cookies, Serialization, Session State, HTML5 Web Storage, Caching, Advanced JavaScript and jQuery, JavaScript Pseudo-Classes, jQuery Foundations, AJAX, Asynchronous File Transmission, Animation, Backbone MVC Frameworks, XML Processing and Web Services, XML Processing, JSON, Overview of Web Services. Course Outcomes:After studying this course, students will be able to • Adapt HTML and CSS syntax and semantics to build web pages.

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Construct and visually format tables and forms using HTML and CSS Develop Client-Side Scripts using JavaScript and Server-Side Scripts using PHP to generate and display the contents dynamically. • Appraise the principles of object oriented development using PHP • Inspect JavaScript frameworks like jQuery and Backbone which facilitates developer to focus on core features. Question paper pattern: The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module. Text Books: 1. Randy Connolly, Ricardo Hoar, "Fundamentals of Web Development”, 1stEdition, Pearson Education India. (ISBN:978-9332575271) Reference Books: 1) Robin Nixon, “Learning PHP, MySQL &JavaScript with jQuery, CSS and HTML5”, 4thEdition, O’Reilly Publications, 2015. (ISBN:978-9352130153) 2) Luke Welling, Laura Thomson, “PHP and MySQL Web Development”, 5th Edition, Pearson Education, 2016. (ISBN:978-9332582736) 3) Nicholas C Zakas, “Professional JavaScript for Web Developers”, 3rd Edition, Wrox/Wiley India, 2012. (ISBN:978-8126535088) 4) David Sawyer Mcfarland, “JavaScript & jQuery: The Missing Manual”, 1st Edition, O’Reilly/Shroff Publishers & Distributors Pvt Ltd, 2014 (ISBN:9789351108078) 5) Zak Ruvalcaba Anne Boehm, “Murach's HTML5 and CSS3”, 3rdEdition, Murachs/Shroff Publishers & Distributors Pvt Ltd, 2016. (ISBN:978-9352133246)

ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURES [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CS72 IA Marks 20 Number of Lecture Hours/Week 4 Exam Marks 80 Total Number of Lecture Hours 50 Exam Hours 03 CREDITS – 04 Course objectives: This course will enable students to • Describe computer architecture. • Measure the performance of architectures in terms of right parameters. • Summarize parallel architecture and the software used for them. Module – 1 Teaching Hours Theory of Parallelism: Parallel Computer Models, The State of Computing, 10 Hours Multiprocessors and Multicomputer ,Multivector and SIMD Computers ,PRAM and VLSI Models, Program and Network Properties ,Conditions of Parallelism, Program Partitioning and Scheduling, Program Flow Mechanisms, System Interconnect Architectures, Principles of Scalable Performance, Performance Metrics and Measures, Parallel Processing Applications, Speedup Performance Laws, Scalability Analysis and Approaches. Module – 2 Hardware Technologies: Processors and Memory Hierarchy, Advanced Processor 10 Hours Technology, Superscalar and Vector Processors, Memory Hierarchy Technology, Virtual Memory Technology. Module – 3 Bus, Cache, and Shared Memory ,Bus Systems ,Cache Memory Organizations 10 Hours ,Shared Memory Organizations ,Sequential and Weak Consistency Models ,Pipelining and Superscalar Techniques ,Linear Pipeline Processors ,Nonlinear Pipeline Processors ,Instruction Pipeline Design ,Arithmetic Pipeline Design (Upto 6.4). Module – 4 Parallel and Scalable Architectures: Multiprocessors and Multicomputers 10 Hours ,Multiprocessor System Interconnects, Cache Coherence and Synchronization Mechanisms, Three Generations of Multicomputers ,Message-Passing Mechanisms ,Multivector and SIMD Computers ,Vector Processing Principles ,Multivector Multiprocessors ,Compound Vector Processing ,SIMD Computer Organizations (Upto 8.4),Scalable, Multithreaded, and Dataflow Architectures, Latency-Hiding Techniques, Principles of Multithreading, Fine-Grain Multicomputers, Scalable and Multithreaded Architectures, Dataflow and Hybrid Architectures. Module – 5 Software for parallel programming: Parallel Models, Languages, and Compilers 10 Hours ,Parallel Programming Models, Parallel Languages and Compilers ,Dependence Analysis of Data Arrays ,Parallel Program Development and Environments, Synchronization and Multiprocessing Modes. Instruction and System Level Parallelism, Instruction Level Parallelism ,Computer Architecture ,Contents, Basic Design Issues ,Problem Definition ,Model of a Typical Processor ,Compiler-detected Instruction Level Parallelism ,Operand Forwarding ,Reorder

Buffer, Register Renaming ,Tomasulo’s Algorithm ,Branch Prediction, Limitations in Exploiting Instruction Level Parallelism ,Thread Level Parallelism. Course outcomes: The students should be able to: • Explain the concepts of parallel computing and hardware technologies • Compare and contrast the parallel architectures • Illustrate parallel programming concepts Question paper pattern The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module. Text Books: 1. Kai Hwang and Naresh Jotwani, Advanced Computer Architecture (SIE): Parallelism, Scalability, Programmability, McGraw Hill Education 3/e. 2015 Reference Books: 1. John L. Hennessy and David A. Patterson, Computer Architecture: A quantitative approach, 5th edition, Morgan Kaufmann Elseveir, 2013

MACHINE LEARNING [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CS73 IA Marks 20 Number of Lecture Hours/Week 03 Exam Marks 80 Total Number of Lecture Hours 50 Exam Hours 03 CREDITS – 04 Course Objectives: This course will enable students to • Define machine learning and problems relevant to machine learning. • Differentiate supervised, unsupervised and reinforcement learning • Apply neural networks, Bayes classifier and k nearest neighbor, for problems appear in machine learning. • Perform statistical analysis of machine learning techniques. Module – 1 Teaching Hours Introduction: Well posed learning problems, Designing a Learning system, 10 Hours Perspective and Issues in Machine Learning. Concept Learning: Concept learning task, Concept learning as search, Find-S algorithm, Version space, Candidate Elimination algorithm, Inductive Bias. Text Book1, Sections: 1.1 – 1.3, 2.1-2.5, 2.7 Module – 2 Decision Tree Learning: Decision tree representation, Appropriate problems for 10 Hours decision tree learning, Basic decision tree learning algorithm, hypothesis space search in decision tree learning, Inductive bias in decision tree learning, Issues in decision tree learning. Text Book1, Sections: 3.1-3.7 Module – 3 Artificial Neural Networks: Introduction, Neural Network representation, 08 Hours Appropriate problems, Perceptrons, Backpropagation algorithm. Text book 1, Sections: 4.1 – 4.6 Module – 4 Bayesian Learning: Introduction, Bayes theorem, Bayes theorem and concept 10 Hours learning, ML and LS error hypothesis, ML for predicting probabilities, MDL principle, Naive Bayes classifier, Bayesian belief networks, EM algorithm Text book 1, Sections: 6.1 – 6.6, 6.9, 6.11, 6.12 Module – 5 Evaluating Hypothesis: Motivation, Estimating hypothesis accuracy, Basics of 12 Hours sampling theorem, General approach for deriving confidence intervals, Difference in error of two hypothesis, Comparing learning algorithms. Instance Based Learning: Introduction, k-nearest neighbor learning, locally weighted regression, radial basis function, cased-based reasoning, Reinforcement Learning: Introduction, Learning Task, Q Learning Text book 1, Sections: 5.1-5.6, 8.1-8.5, 13.1-13.3 Course Outcomes:After studying this course, students will be able to • Identify the problems for machine learning. And select the either supervised,

unsupersvised or reinforcement learning. • Explain theory of probability and statistics related to machine learning • Investigate concept learning, ANN, Bayes classifier, k nearest neighbor, Q, Question paper pattern: The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module. Text Books: 1. Tom M. Mitchell, Machine Learning, India Edition 2013, McGraw Hill Education. Reference Books: 1. Trevor Hastie, Robert Tibshirani, Jerome Friedman, h The Elements of Statistical Learning, 2nd edition, springer series in statistics. 2. Ethem Alpaydın, Introduction to machine learning, second edition, MIT press.

NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CS741 IA Marks Number of Lecture Hours/Week 3 Exam Marks Total Number of Lecture Hours 40 Exam Hours CREDITS – 03 Course objectives: This course will enable students to • Learn the techniques in natural language processing. • Be familiar with the natural language generation. • Be exposed to Text Mining. • Understand the information retrieval techniques Module – 1

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Teaching Hours Overview and language modeling: Overview: Origins and challenges of NLP- 8 Hours Language and Grammar-Processing Indian Languages- NLP ApplicationsInformation Retrieval. Language Modeling: Various Grammar- based Language Models-Statistical Language Model. Module – 2 Word level and syntactic analysis: Word Level Analysis: Regular Expressions- 8 Hours Finite-State Automata-Morphological Parsing-Spelling Error Detection and correction-Words and Word classes-Part-of Speech Tagging. Syntactic Analysis: Context-free Grammar-Constituency- Parsing-Probabilistic Parsing. Module – 3 Extracting Relations from Text: From Word Sequences to Dependency 8 Hours Paths: Introduction, Subsequence Kernels for Relation Extraction, A Dependency-Path Kernel for Relation Extraction and Experimental Evaluation. Mining Diagnostic Text Reports by Learning to Annotate Knowledge Roles: Introduction, Domain Knowledge and Knowledge Roles, Frame Semantics and Semantic Role Labeling, Learning to Annotate Cases with Knowledge Roles and Evaluations. A Case Study in Natural Language Based Web Search: InFact System Overview, The GlobalSecurity.org Experience. Module – 4 Evaluating Self-Explanations in iSTART: Word Matching, Latent Semantic 8 Hours Analysis, and Topic Models: Introduction, iSTART: Feedback Systems, iSTART: Evaluation of Feedback Systems, Textual Signatures: Identifying Text-Types Using Latent Semantic Analysis to Measure the Cohesion of Text Structures: Introduction, Cohesion, CohMetrix, Approaches to Analyzing Texts, Latent Semantic Analysis, Predictions, Results of Experiments. Automatic Document Separation: A Combination of Probabilistic Classification and Finite-State Sequence Modeling: Introduction, Related Work, Data Preparation, Document Separation as a Sequence Mapping Problem, Results. Evolving Explanatory Novel Patterns for Semantically-Based Text Mining: Related Work, A Semantically Guided Model for Effective Text Mining.

Module – 5 INFORMATION RETRIEVAL AND LEXICAL RESOURCES: Information 8 Hours Retrieval: Design features of Information Retrieval Systems-Classical, Non classical, Alternative Models of Information Retrieval – valuation Lexical Resources: World Net-Frame Net- Stemmers-POS Tagger- Research Corpora. Course outcomes: The students should be able to: • Analyze the natural language text. • Generate the natural language. • Do Text mining. • Apply information retrieval techniques. Question paper pattern: The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module. Text Books: 1. Tanveer Siddiqui, U.S. Tiwary, “Natural Language Processing and Information Retrieval”, Oxford University Press, 2008. 2. Anne Kao and Stephen R. Poteet (Eds), “Natural LanguageProcessing and Text Mining”, Springer-Verlag London Limited 2007. Reference Books: 1. Daniel Jurafsky and James H Martin, “Speech and Language Processing: Anintroduction to Natural Language Processing, Computational Linguistics and SpeechRecognition”, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2008. 2. James Allen, “Natural Language Understanding”, 2nd edition, Benjamin/Cummingspublishing company, 1995. 3. Gerald J. Kowalski and Mark.T. Maybury, “Information Storage and Retrieval systems”, Kluwer academic Publishers, 2000.

CLOUD COMPUTING AND ITS APPLICATIONS [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CS742 IA Marks Number of Lecture Hours/Week 3 Exam Marks Total Number of Lecture Hours 40 Exam Hours CREDITS – 03 Course objectives: This course will enable students to • Explain the fundamentals of cloud computing • Illustrate the cloud application programming and aneka platform • Contrast different cloud platforms used in industry Module – 1

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Teaching Hours Introduction ,Cloud Computing at a Glance, The Vision of Cloud Computing, 8 Hours Defining a Cloud, A Closer Look, Cloud Computing Reference Model, Characteristics and Benefits, Challenges Ahead, Historical Developments, Distributed Systems, Virtualization, Web 2.0, Service-Oriented Computing, Utility-Oriented Computing, Building Cloud Computing Environments, Application Development, Infrastructure and System Development, Computing Platforms and Technologies, Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google AppEngine, Microsoft Azure, Hadoop, Force.com and Salesforce.com, Manjrasoft Aneka Virtualization, Introduction, Characteristics of Virtualized, Environments Taxonomy of Virtualization Techniques, Execution Virtualization, Other Types of Virtualization, Virtualization and Cloud Computing, Pros and Cons of Virtualization, Technology Examples Xen: Paravirtualization, VMware: Full Virtualization, Microsoft Hyper-V Module – 2 Cloud Computing Architecture, Introduction, Cloud Reference Model, 8 Hours Architecture, Infrastructure / Hardware as a Service, Platform as a Service, Software as a Service, Types of Clouds, Public Clouds, Private Clouds, Hybrid Clouds, Community Clouds, Economics of the Cloud, Open Challenges, Cloud Definition, Cloud Interoperability and Standards Scalability and Fault Tolerance Security, Trust, and Privacy Organizational Aspects Aneka: Cloud Application Platform, Framework Overview, Anatomy of the Aneka Container, From the Ground Up: Platform Abstraction Layer, Fabric Services, foundation Services, Application Services, Building Aneka Clouds, Infrastructure Organization, Logical Organization, Private Cloud Deployment Mode, Public Cloud Deployment Mode, Hybrid Cloud Deployment Mode, Cloud Programming and Management, Aneka SDK, Management Tools Module – 3 Concurrent Computing: Thread Programming, Introducing Parallelism for Single 8 Hours Machine Computation, Programming Applications with Threads, What is a Thread?, Thread APIs, Techniques for Parallel Computation with Threads, Multithreading with Aneka, Introducing the Thread Programming Model, Aneka Thread vs. Common Threads, Programming Applications with Aneka Threads, Aneka Threads Application Model, Domain Decomposition: Matrix

Multiplication, Functional Decomposition: Sine, Cosine, and Tangent. High-Throughput Computing: Task Programming, Task Computing, Characterizing a Task, Computing Categories, Frameworks for Task Computing, Task-based Application Models, Embarrassingly Parallel Applications, Parameter Sweep Applications, MPI Applications, Workflow Applications with Task Dependencies, Aneka Task-Based Programming, Task Programming Model, Developing Applications with the Task Model, Developing Parameter Sweep Application, Managing Workflows. Module – 4 Data Intensive Computing: Map-Reduce Programming, What is Data-Intensive 8 Hours Computing?, Characterizing Data-Intensive Computations, Challenges Ahead, Historical Perspective, Technologies for Data-Intensive Computing, Storage Systems, Programming Platforms, Aneka MapReduce Programming, Introducing the MapReduce Programming Model, Example Application Module – 5 Cloud Platforms in Industry, Amazon Web Services, Compute Services, Storage 8 Hours Services, Communication Services, Additional Services, Google AppEngine, Architecture and Core Concepts, Application Life-Cycle, Cost Model, Observations, Microsoft Azure, Azure Core Concepts, SQL Azure, Windows Azure Platform Appliance. Cloud Applications Scientific Applications, Healthcare: ECG Analysis in the Cloud, Biology: Protein Structure Prediction, Biology: Gene Expression Data Analysis for Cancer Diagnosis, Geoscience: Satellite Image Processing, Business and Consumer Applications, CRM and ERP, Productivity, Social Networking, Media Applications, Multiplayer Online Gaming. Course outcomes: The students should be able to: • Explain cloud computing, virtualization and classify services of cloud computing • Illustrate architecture and programming in cloud • Describe the platforms for development of cloud applications and List the application of cloud. Question paper pattern: The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module. Text Books: 1. Rajkumar Buyya, Christian Vecchiola, and Thamarai Selvi Mastering Cloud. Computing McGraw Hill Education Reference Books: 1. Dan C. Marinescu, Cloud Computing Theory and Practice, Morgan Kaufmann, Elsevier 2013.

INFORMATION AND NETWORK SECURITY [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CS743 IA Marks Number of Lecture Hours/Week 3 Exam Marks Total Number of Lecture Hours 40 Exam Hours CREDITS – 03 Course objectives: This course will enable students to • Analyze the cryptographic processes. • Summarize the digital security process. • Indicate the location of a security process in the given system Module – 1

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Teaching Hours Introduction. How to Speak Crypto. Classic Crypto. Simple Substitution Cipher. 8 Hours Cryptanalysis of a Simple Substitution. Definition of Secure. Double Transposition Cipher. One-time Pad. Project VENONA. Codebook Cipher. Ciphers of the Election of 1876. Modern Crypto History. Taxonomy of Cryptography. Taxonomy of Cryptanalysis. Module – 2. What is a Hash Function? The Birthday Problem.Non-cryptographic Hashes. 8 Hours Tiger Hash. HMAC. Uses of Hash Functions. Online Bids. Spam Reduction. Other Crypto-Related Topics. Secret Sharing. Key Escrow. Random Numbers. Texas Hold 'em Poker. Generating Random Bits. Information Hiding. Module – 3 Random number generation Providing freshness Fundamentals of entity 8 Hours authentication Passwords Dynamic password schemes Zero-knowledge mechanisms Further reading Cryptographic Protocols Protocol basics From objectives to a protocol Analysing a simple protocol Authentication and key establishment protocols Module – 4 Key management fundamentals Key lengths and lifetimes Key generation Key 8 Hours establishment Key storage Key usage Governing key management Public-Key Management Certification of public keys The certificate lifecycle Public-key management models Alternative approaches Module – 5 Cryptographic Applications Cryptography on the Internet Cryptography for 8 Hours wireless local area networks Cryptography for mobile telecommunications Cryptography for secure payment card transactions Cryptography for video broadcasting Cryptography for identity cards Cryptography for home users Course outcomes: The students should be able to: • Analyze the Digitals security lapses • Illustrate the need of key management Question paper pattern: The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module.

Text Books: 1. Information Security: Principles and Practice, 2nd Edition by Mark Stamp Wiley 2. Everyday Cryptography: Fundamental Principles and Applications Keith M. Martin Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2013 Reference Books: 1. Applied Cryptography Protocols, Algorithms, and Source Code in C by Bruce Schneier

UNIX SYSTEM PROGRAMMING [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CS744 IA Marks 20 Number of Lecture Hours/Week 3 Exam Marks 80 Total Number of Lecture Hours 40 Exam Hours 03 CREDITS – 03 Course objectives: This course will enable students to • Explain the fundamental design of the unix operating system • Familiarize with the systems calls provided in the unix environment • Design and build an application/service over the unix operating system Module – 1 Teaching Hours Introduction: UNIX and ANSI Standards: The ANSI C Standard, The ANSI/ISO 8 Hours C++ Standards, Difference between ANSI C and C++, The POSIX Standards, The POSIX.1 FIPS Standard, The X/Open Standards. UNIX and POSIX APIs: The POSIX APIs, The UNIX and POSIX Development Environment, API Common Characteristics. Module – 2 UNIX Files and APIs: File Types, The UNIX and POSIX File System, The 8 Hours UNIX and POSIX File Attributes, Inodes in UNIX System V, Application Program Interface to Files, UNIX Kernel Support for Files, Relationship of C Stream Pointers and File Descriptors, Directory Files, Hard and Symbolic Links. UNIX File APIs: General File APIs, File and Record Locking, Directory File APIs, Device File APIs, FIFO File APIs, Symbolic Link File APIs. Module – 3 UNIX Processes and Process Control: The Environment of a UNIX Process: 8 Hours Introduction, main function, Process Termination, Command-Line Arguments, Environment List, Memory Layout of a C Program, Shared Libraries, Memory Allocation, Environment Variables, setjmp and longjmp Functions, getrlimit, setrlimit Functions, UNIX Kernel Support for Processes. Process Control: Introduction, Process Identifiers, fork, vfork, exit, wait, waitpid, wait3, wait4 Functions, Race Conditions, exec Functions, Changing User IDs and Group IDs, Interpreter Files, system Function, Process Accounting, User Identification, Process Times, I/O Redirection. Process Relationships: Introduction, Terminal Logins, Network Logins, Process Groups, Sessions, Controlling Terminal, tcgetpgrp and tcsetpgrp Functions, Job Control, Shell Execution of Programs, Orphaned Process Groups. Module – 4 Signals and Daemon Processes: Signals: The UNIX Kernel Support for Signals, 8 Hours signal, Signal Mask, sigaction, The SIGCHLD Signal and the waitpid Function, The sigsetjmp and siglongjmp Functions, Kill, Alarm, Interval Timers, POSIX.lb Timers. Daemon Processes: Introduction, Daemon Characteristics, Coding Rules, Error Logging, Client-Server Model. Module – 5 Interprocess Communication : Overview of IPC Methods, Pipes, popen, pclose 8 Hours Functions, Coprocesses, FIFOs, System V IPC, Message Queues, Semaphores.

Shared Memory, Client-Server Properties, Stream Pipes, Passing File Descriptors, An Open Server-Version 1, Client-Server Connection Functions. Course outcomes: The students should be able to: • Ability to understand and reason out the working of Unix Systems • Build an application/service over a Unix system. Question paper pattern: The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module. Text Books: 1. Unix System Programming Using C++ - Terrence Chan, PHI, 1999. 2. Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment - W.Richard Stevens, Stephen A. Rago, 3nd Edition, Pearson Education / PHI, 2005. Reference Books: 1. Advanced Unix Programming- Marc J. Rochkind, 2nd Edition, Pearson Education, 2005. 2. The Design of the UNIX Operating System - Maurice.J.Bach, Pearson Education / PHI, 1987. 3. Unix Internals - Uresh Vahalia, Pearson Education, 2001.

SOFT AND EVOLUTIONARY COMPUTING [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CS751 IA Marks 20 Number of Lecture Hours/Week 3 Exam Marks 80 Total Number of Lecture Hours 40 Exam Hours 03 CREDITS – 03 Course objectives: This course will enable students to • Familiarize with the basic concept of soft computing and intelligent systems • Compare with various intelligent systems • Analyze the various soft computing techniques Module – 1 Teaching Hours Introduction to soft computing: ANN, FS,GA, SI, ES, Comparing among 8 Hours intelligent systems ANN: introduction, biological inspiration, BNN&ANN, classification, first Generation NN, perceptron, illustrative problems Text Book 1: Chapter1: 1.1-1.8, Chapter2: 2.1-2.6 Module – 2 Adaline, Medaline, ANN: (2nd generation), introduction, BPN, KNN,HNN, 8 Hours BAM, RBF,SVM and illustrative problems Text Book 1: Chapter2: 3.1,3.2,3.3,3.6,3.7,3.10,3.11 Module – 3 Fuzzy logic: introduction, human learning ability, undecidability, probability 8 Hours theory, classical set and fuzzy set, fuzzy set operations, fuzzy relations, fuzzy compositions, natural language and fuzzy interpretations, structure of fuzzy inference system, illustrative problems Text Book 1: Chapter 5 Module – 4 Introduction to GA, GA, procedures, working of GA, GA applications, 8 Hours applicability, evolutionary programming, working of EP, GA based Machine learning classifier system, illustrative problems Text Book 1: Chapter 7 Module – 5 Swarm Intelligent system: Introduction, Background of SI, Ant colony system 8 Hours Working of ACO, Particle swarm Intelligence(PSO). Text Book 1: 8.1-8.4, 8.7 Course outcomes: The students should be able to: • Understand soft computing techniques • Apply the learned techniques to solve realistic problems • Differentiate soft computing with hard computing techniques Question paper pattern: The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module.

Text Books: 1. Soft computing : N. P Padhy and S P Simon , Oxford University Press 2015 Reference Books: 1. Principles of Soft Computing, Shivanandam, Deepa S. N Wiley India, ISBN 13: 2011

COMPUTER VISION AND ROBOTICS [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CS752 IA Marks 20 Number of Lecture Hours/Week 3 Exam Marks 80 Total Number of Lecture Hours 40 Exam Hours 03 CREDITS – 03 Course objectives: This course will enable students to • Review image processing techniques for computer vision • Explain shape and region analysis • Illustrate Hough Transform and its applications to detect lines, circles, ellipses • Contrast three-dimensional image analysis techniques, motion analysis and applications of computer vision algorithms Module – 1 Teaching Hours CAMERAS: Pinhole Cameras, Radiometry – Measuring Light: Light in 8 Hours Space, Light Surfaces, Important Special Cases, Sources, Shadows, And Shading: Qualitative Radiometry, Sources and Their Effects, Local Shading Models, Application: Photometric Stereo, Interreflections: Global Shading Models, Color: The Physics of Color, Human Color Perception, Representing Color, A Model for Image Color, Surface Color from Image Color. Module – 2 Linear Filters: Linear Filters and Convolution, Shift Invariant Linear Systems, 8 Hours Spatial Frequency and Fourier Transforms, Sampling and Aliasing, Filters as Templates, Edge Detection: Noise, Estimating Derivatives, Detecting Edges, Texture: Representing Texture, Analysis (and Synthesis) Using Oriented Pyramids, Application: Synthesis by Sampling Local Models, Shape from Texture. Module – 3 The Geometry of Multiple Views: Two Views, Stereopsis: Reconstruction, 8 Hours Human Stereposis, Binocular Fusion, Using More Cameras, Segmentation by Clustering: What Is Segmentation?, Human Vision: Grouping and Getstalt, Applications: Shot Boundary Detection and Background Subtraction, Image Segmentation by Clustering Pixels, Segmentation by Graph-Theoretic Clustering, Module – 4 Segmentation by Fitting a Model: The Hough Transform, Fitting Lines, Fitting 8 Hours Curves, Fitting as a Probabilistic Inference Problem, Robustness, Segmentation and Fitting Using Probabilistic Methods: Missing Data Problems, Fitting, and Segmentation, The EM Algorithm in Practice, Tracking With Linear Dynamic Models: Tracking as an Abstract Inference Problem, Linear Dynamic Models, Kalman Filtering, Data Association, Applications and Examples. Module – 5 Geometric Camera Models: Elements of Analytical Euclidean Geometry, 8 Hours Camera Parameters and the Perspective Projection, Affine Cameras and Affine Projection Equations, Geometric Camera Calibration: Least-Squares Parameter Estimation, A Linear Approach to Camera Calibration, Taking Radial Distortion into Account, Analytical Photogrammetry, An Application: Mobile Robot Localization, Model- Based Vision: Initial Assumptions, Obtaining

Hypotheses by Pose Consistency, Obtaining Hypotheses by pose Clustering, Obtaining Hypotheses Using Invariants, Verification, Application: Registration In Medical Imaging Systems, Curved Surfaces and Alignment. Course outcomes: The students should be able to: • Implement fundamental image processing techniques required for computer vision • Perform shape analysis • Implement boundary tracking techniques • Apply chain codes and other region descriptors • Apply Hough Transform for line, circle, and ellipse detections. • Apply 3D vision techniques. • Implement motion related techniques. • Develop applications using computer vision techniques. Question paper pattern: The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module. Text Books: 1. David A. Forsyth and Jean Ponce: Computer Vision – A Modern Approach, PHI Learning (Indian Edition), 2009. Reference Books: 2. E. R. Davies: Computer and Machine Vision – Theory, Algorithms and Practicalities, Elsevier (Academic Press), 4th edition, 2013.

DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CS753 IA Marks Number of Lecture Hours/Week 3 Exam Marks Total Number of Lecture Hours 40 Exam Hours CREDITS – 03 Course objectives: This course will enable students to • Define the fundamental concepts in image processing • Evaluate techniques followed in image enhancements • Illustrate image segmentation and compression algorithms Module – 1

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Teaching Hours Introduction Fundamental Steps in Digital Image Processing, Components of an 8 Hours Image Processing System, Sampling and Quantization, Representing Digital Images (Data structure), Some Basic Relationships Between Pixels- Neighbors and Connectivity of pixels in image, Applications of Image Processing: Medical imaging, Robot vision, Character recognition, Remote Sensing. Module – 2 Image Enhancement In The Spatial Domain: Some Basic Gray Level 8 Hours Transformations, Histogram Processing, Enhancement Using Arithmetic/Logic Operations, Basics of Spatial Filtering, Smoothing Spatial Filters, Sharpening Spatial Filters, Combining Spatial Enhancement Methods. Module – 3 Image Enhancement In Frequency Domain: 8 Hours Introduction, Fourier Transform, Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), properties of DFT , Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), Image filtering in frequency domain. Module – 4 Image Segmentation: Introduction, Detection of isolated points, line detection, 8 Hours Edge detection, Edge linking, Region based segmentation- Region growing, split and merge technique, local processing, regional processing, Hough transform, Segmentation using Threshold. Module – 5 Image Compression: Introduction, coding Redundancy , Inter-pixel redundancy, 8 Hours image compression model, Lossy and Lossless compression, Huffman Coding, Arithmetic Coding, LZW coding, Transform Coding, Sub-image size selection, blocking, DCT implementation using FFT, Run length coding. Course outcomes: The students should be able to: • Explain fundamentals of image processing • Compare transformation algorithms • Contrast enhancement, segmentation and compression techniques Question paper pattern: The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module.

Text Books: 1. Rafael C G., Woods R E. and Eddins S L, Digital Image Processing, Prentice Hall, 3rd edition, 2008. Reference Books: 1. Milan Sonka,”Image Processing, analysis and Machine Vision”, Thomson Press India Ltd, Fourth Edition. 2. Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing- Anil K. Jain, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall of India. 3. S. Sridhar , Digital Image Processing, Oxford University Press, 2nd Ed, 2016.

STORAGE AREA NETWORKS [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CS754 IA Marks 20 Number of Lecture Hours/Week 3 Exam Marks 80 Total Number of Lecture Hours 40 Exam Hours 03 CREDITS – 03 Course objectives: This course will enable students to • Evaluate storage architectures, • Define backup, recovery, disaster recovery, business continuity, and replication • Examine emerging technologies including IP-SAN • Understand logical and physical components of a storage infrastructure • Identify components of managing and monitoring the data center • Define information security and identify different storage virtualization technologies Module – 1 Teaching Hours Storage System Introduction to evolution of storage architecture, key data center 8 Hours elements, virtualization, and cloud computing. Key data center elements – Host (or compute), connectivity, storage, and application in both classic and virtual environments. RAID implementations, techniques, and levels along with the impact of RAID on application performance.Components of intelligent storage systems and virtual storage provisioning and intelligent storage system implementations. Module – 2 Storage Networking Technologies and Virtualization Fibre Channel SAN 8 Hours components, connectivity options, and topologies including access protection mechanism ‘zoning”, FC protocol stack, addressing and operations, SAN-based virtualization and VSAN technology, iSCSI and FCIP protocols for storage access over IP network, Converged protocol FCoE and its components, Network Attached Storage (NAS) - components, protocol and operations, File level storage virtualization, Object based storage and unified storage platform. Module – 3 Backup, Archive, and Replication This unit focuses on information availability 8 Hours and business continuity solutions in both virtualized and non-virtualized environments. Business continuity terminologies, planning and solutions, Clustering and multipathing architecture to avoid single points of failure, Backup and recovery - methods, targets and topologies, Data deduplication and backup in virtualized environment, Fixed content and data archive, Local replication in classic and virtual environments, Remote replication in classic and virtual environments, Three-site remote replication and continuous data protection Module – 4 Cloud Computing Characteristics and benefits This unit focuses on the 8 Hours business drivers, definition, essential characteristics, and phases of journey to the Cloud. ,Business drivers for Cloud computing, Definition of Cloud computing, Characteristics of Cloud computing, Steps involved in transitioning from Classic data center to Cloud computing environment Services and deployment models, Cloud infrastructure components, Cloud migration considerations Module – 5

Securing and Managing Storage Infrastructure This chapter focuses on 8 Hours framework and domains of storage security along with covering security. implementation at storage networking. Security threats, and countermeasures in various domains Security solutions for FC-SAN, IP-SAN and NAS environments, Security in virtualized and cloud environments, Monitoring and managing various information infrastructure components in classic and virtual environments, Information lifecycle management (ILM) and storage tiering, Cloud service management activities Course outcomes: The students should be able to: • Identify key challenges in managing information and analyze different storage networking technologies and virtualization • Explain components and the implementation of NAS • Describe CAS architecture and types of archives and forms of virtualization • Ilustrate the storage infrastructure and management activities Question paper pattern: The question paper will have ten questions. There will be 2 questions from each module. Each question will have questions covering all the topics under a module. The students will have to answer 5 full questions, selecting one full question from each module. Text Books: 1. Information Storage and Management,Author :EMC Education Services, Publisher: Wiley ISBN: 9781118094839 2. Storage Virtualization, Author: Clark Tom, Publisher: Addison Wesley Publishing Company ISBN : 9780321262516 Reference Books: NIL

MACHINE LEARNING LABORATORY [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CSL76 IA Marks 20 Number of Lecture Hours/Week 01I + 02P Exam Marks 80 Total Number of Lecture Hours 40 Exam Hours 03 CREDITS – 02 Course objectives: This course will enable students to 1. Make use of Data sets in implementing the machine learning algorithms 2. Implement the machine learning concepts and algorithms in any suitable language of choice. Description (If any): 1. The programs can be implemented in either JAVA or Python. 2. For Problems 1 to 6 and 10, programs are to be developed without using the built-in classes or APIs of Java/Python. 3. Data sets can be taken from standard repositories (https://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/datasets.html) or constructed by the students. Lab Experiments: 1. Implement and demonstratethe FIND-Salgorithm for finding the most specific hypothesis based on a given set of training data samples. Read the training data from a .CSV file. 2. For a given set of training data examples stored in a .CSV file, implement and demonstrate the Candidate-Elimination algorithmto output a description of the set of all hypotheses consistent with the training examples. 3. Write a program to demonstrate the working of the decision tree based ID3 algorithm. Use an appropriate data set for building the decision tree and apply this knowledge toclassify a new sample. 4. Build an Artificial Neural Network by implementing the Backpropagation algorithm and test the same using appropriate data sets. 5. Write a program to implement the naïve Bayesian classifier for a sample training data set stored as a .CSV file. Compute the accuracy of the classifier, considering few test data sets. 6. Assuming a set of documents that need to be classified, use the naïve Bayesian Classifier model to perform this task. Built-in Java classes/API can be used to write the program. Calculate the accuracy, precision, and recall for your data set. 7. Write a program to construct aBayesian network considering medical data. Use this model to demonstrate the diagnosis of heart patients using standard Heart Disease Data Set. You can use Java/Python ML library classes/API. 8. Apply EM algorithm to cluster a set of data stored in a .CSV file. Use the same data set for clustering using k-Means algorithm. Compare the results of these two algorithms and comment on the quality of clustering. You can add Java/Python ML library classes/API in the program. 9. Write a program to implement k-Nearest Neighbour algorithm to classify the iris data set. Print both correct and wrong predictions. Java/Python ML library classes can be used for this problem. 10. Implement the non-parametric Locally Weighted Regressionalgorithm in order to fit data points. Select appropriate data set for your experiment and draw graphs.

Study Experiment / Project: NIL Course outcomes: The students should be able to: 1. Understand the implementation procedures for the machine learning algorithms. 2. Design Java/Python programs for various Learning algorithms. 3. Applyappropriate data sets to the Machine Learning algorithms. 4. Identify and apply Machine Learning algorithms to solve real world problems. Conduction of Practical Examination: • All laboratory experiments are to be included for practical examination. • Students are allowed to pick one experiment from the lot. • Strictly follow the instructions as printed on the cover page of answer script • Marks distribution: Procedure + Conduction + Viva:20 + 50 +10 (80) Change of experiment is allowed only once and marks allotted to the procedure part to be made zero.

WEB TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH MINI PROJECT [As per Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) scheme] (Effective from the academic year 2016 -2017) SEMESTER – VII Subject Code 15CSL77 IA Marks 20 Number of Lecture Hours/Week 01I + 02P Exam Marks 80 Total Number of Lecture Hours 40 Exam Hours 03 CREDITS – 02 Course objectives: This course will enable students to 1. Design and develop static and dynamic web pages. 2. Familiarize with Client-Side Programming, Server-Side Programming, Active server Pages. 3. Learn Database Connectivity to web applications. Description (If any): NIL Lab Experiments: PART A 1. Write a JavaScript to design a simple calculator to perform the following operations: sum, product, difference and quotient. 2. Write a JavaScript that calculates the squares and cubes of the numbers from 0 to 10 and outputs HTML text that displays the resulting values in an HTML table format. 3. Write a JavaScript code that displays text “TEXT-GROWING” with increasing font size in the interval of 100ms in RED COLOR, when the font size reaches 50pt it displays “TEXT-SHRINKING” in BLUE color. Then the font size decreases to 5pt. 4. Develop and demonstrate a HTML5 file that includes JavaScript script that uses functions for the following problems: a. Parameter: A string b. Output: The position in the string of the left-most vowel c. Parameter: A number d. Output: The number with its digits in the reverse order 5. Design an XML document to store information about a student in an engineering college affiliated to VTU. The information must include USN, Name, and Name of the College, Branch, Year of Joining, and email id. Make up sample data for 3 students. Create a CSS style sheet and use it to display the document. 6. Write a PHP program to keep track of the number of visitors visiting the web page and to display this count of visitors, with proper headings. 7. Write a PHP program to display a digital clock which displays the current time of the server. 8. Write the PHP programs to do the following: a. Implement simple calculator operations. b. Find the transpose of a matrix. c. Multiplication of two matrices. d. Addition of two matrices.

9. Write a PHP program named states.py that declares a variable states with value "Mississippi Alabama Texas Massachusetts Kansas". write a PHP program that does the following: a. Search for a word in variable states that ends in xas. Store this word in element 0 of a list named statesList. b. Search for a word in states that begins with k and ends in s. Perform a caseinsensitive comparison. [Note: Passing re.Ias a second parameter to method compile performs a case-insensitive comparison.] Store this word in element1 of statesList. c. Search for a word in states that begins with M and ends in s. Store this word in element 2 of the list. d. Search for a word in states that ends in a. Store this word in element 3 of the list. 10. Write a PHP program to sort the student records which are stored in the database using selection sort. Study Experiment / Project: Develop a web application project using the languages and concepts learnt in the theory and exercises listed in part A with a good look and feel effects. You can use any web technologies and frameworks and databases. Note: 1. In the examination each student picks one question from part A. 2. A team of two or three students must develop the mini project. However during the examination, each student must demonstrate the project individually. 3. The team must submit a brief project report (15-20 pages) that must include the following a. Introduction b. Requirement Analysis c. Software Requirement Specification d. Analysis and Design e. Implementation f. Testing Course outcomes: The students should be able to: • Design and develop dynamic web pages with good aesthetic sense of designing and latest technical know-how's. • Have a good understanding of Web Application Terminologies, Internet Tools other web services. • Learn how to link and publish web sites Conduction of Practical Examination: 1. All laboratory experiments from part A are to be included for practical examination.

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Mini project has to be evaluated for 30 Marks. Report should be prepared in a standard format prescribed for project work. Students are allowed to pick one experiment from the lot. Strictly follow the instructions as printed on the cover page of answer script. Marks distribution: a) Part A: Procedure + Conduction + Viva:10 + 35 +5 =50 Marks b) Part B: Demonstration + Report + Viva voce = 15+10+05 = 30 Marks Change of experiment is allowed only once and marks allotted to the procedure part to be made zero.